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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to New Religionists, Europe

New Religionists, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
New Religionists Germany, West 1,000,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. "Another more detailed assessment for West Germany covering many more movements concludes that well over one million people are involved or 'influenced' by new religions, with a 'full-time' membership of 64,200. The estimated full time membership for 12 of these movements is: " [table]
New Religionists Hong Kong - 3.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; "New Religions " includes "combinations of Chinese religions with other world religions "
New Religionists Japan - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1495. "It is not easy to say just how many new sects there are in Japan... estimates of new movements still vary from 170 to more than 700. Even if the smaller figure is more nearly accurate, the size and influence of Japan's new sects is still impressive. Several of them have recruited hundreds of thousands of members, built impressive headquarters and have sometimes constructed holy towns as their centres. "
New Religionists Japan - 10.00% - - 1992 *LINK* web site: "A Brief Survey of Religion in Modern Japan " (1998). By Paul A. Shew, December 1, 1992. (Waseda University, Tokyo) "In independent surveys where people are asked to state their own religion, there are the approximate results: Shinto 2-3%; Buddhism 20%; Christianity 1-2%; a new religion 10%; no religion 65% "
New Religionists Japan - 25.00% - - 1993 Rausch, David A. & Carl Hermann Voss. World Religions: Our Quest for Meaning; Trinity Press International: Valley Forge, PA (1993); pg. 111. "Today it is estimated that at least 25 percent of Japan's citizens are formal members of a new religion. "
New Religionists Japan - 20.00% - - 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 227. "One of the most interesting contemporary religious phenomena, the Japanese new religions have emerged... parallel to the emergence of Japan as a modern nation. As many as one-fifth of all Japanese now belong to one of the new religions. "
New Religionists Japan - 24.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; "New Religions " = "Syncretistic religions of Shinto and New Age Philosophy "
New Religionists Korea - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "Korea, since the 1960s, has seen the emergence of religious movements seeking to rediscover the indigenous Korean religion, that ancient religion which is believed to have prevailed prior to the importation of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Christianity. These movements include the Tan Goon Church, named after Tan Goon, the ancestor of the Korean people; the Tae Jong Church, the Han Il Church, the Chun Do Church, and countless small groups of folk religionists. "
New Religionists Korea, South 1,600,000 - - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "A Window on Korea " (cinema.sangji.ac.kr); web page: "New Religions in Modern Korea " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999) "Korea's flourishing modern movements, grouped under the heading of 'New Religions,' number more than 240 throughout the country... A total overall figure would probably give a membership of 1,600,000 for all these recent sects taken together. "
New Religionists Korea, South 1,600,000 - - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "A Window on Korea "; web page: "New Religions in Modern Korea " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999) "Korea's flourishing modern movements, grouped under the heading of 'New Religions,' number more than 240 throughout the country. Most of them have small memberships and have developed primarily from the Tonghak Movement of the 1860s. The largest such sect boasts as many as 600,000 followers, and some of the smaller ones consist of groups of 10 or so members only. A total overall figure would probably give a membership of 1,600,000 for all these recent sects taken together. "
New Religionists Latin America 913,000 0.20% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1995 "; "New-Religionists. followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800. "
New Religionists Latin America 919,000 0.19% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1996 "; "New-Religionists. followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800. "
New Religionists Latin America 604,000 0.12% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "; "New-Religionists. Followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800, most since 1945. "
New Religionists North America - 0.00% - - 1900 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "New-Religionists "
New Religionists North America - 0.00% - - 1925 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "New-Religionists "
New Religionists North America - 0.00% - - 1950 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "New-Religionists "
New Religionists North America - 0.00% - - 1975 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "New-Religionists "
New Religionists North America 958,000 0.33% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1995 "; "New-Religionists. followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800. "
New Religionists North America 900,000 0.30% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1996 "; "New-Religionists. followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800. "
New Religionists North America 759,000 0.25% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "; "New-Religionists. Followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800, most since 1945. "
New Religionists North America - 0.20% - - 2000 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "New-Religionists "; [Year 2000 projection made circa 1997]
New Religionists North America - 0.30% - - 2025 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "New-Religionists "; [Year 2025 projection made circa 1997]
New Religionists Oceania 10,000 0.04% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1995 "; "New-Religionists. followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800. "
New Religionists Oceania 11,000 0.04% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1996 "; "New-Religionists. followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800. "
New Religionists Oceania 51,000 0.17% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "; "New-Religionists. Followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800, most since 1945. "
New Religionists USA 0 0.00% - - 1900 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
New Religionists USA 110,000 0.10% - - 1970 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
New Religionists USA - 10.00% 3,000
units
- 1972 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 152. "Altogether, the various new religions may have resulted in the organization of more than 3,000 local groups of one kind or another, with perhaps as many as a tenth of the entire population having participated in at least one by the early 1970s. "
New Religionists USA 750,000 0.30% - - 1990 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
New Religionists USA 947,000 0.40% - - 1995 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
New Religionists USA 610,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
New Religionists USA 85,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); "last updated October 1998 " Table: "'Other Than Christian' Organizations "; "Some of the following data were estimated from North American figures: "; For estimate of New Religionists: "Misc. faiths, mostly since 1945 "
New Religionists USA 1,074,000 0.40% - - 2000 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States. Year 2000 projection done in 1995.
New Religionists world - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "The new religions of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an aggregate membership of over 130 million people, comprise the fastest growing segment of the religious life on this planet. They demonstrate the continued vitality and freedom of the spirit, which ever seeks to break out of conventional institutional forms. Most of the new religions may be regarded as offshoots of older religious traditions. Although they are often grouped together on sociological grounds, from the viewpoint of their religious content they resemble their parent religions far more than they resemble each other. "
New Religionists world 121,297,000 2.12% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1995 "; "New-Religionists. followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800. "
New Religionists world 106,015,000 1.83% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1996 "; "New-Religionists. followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800. "
New Religionists world 100,144,000 1.69% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "; "New-Religionists. Followers of Asian 20th-cent. New Religions, New Religious movements, radical new crisis religions, and non-Christian syncretistic mass religions, all founded since 1800, most since 1945. "
New Religionists - full-time Denmark 2,000 0.04% - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "...following James A. Beckford's... classical model for membership in new religious movements, the figures are larger if all sub-populations in these groups are taken into consideration... However, even if all sub-populations are considered... the success of the recent new religions in Denmark is meagre to say the least. Some 100 nonconventional religious groups [are in Denmark], but the total number of Beckfordian devotees & adepts is, in my estimation, less than 2,000 individuals at [any one time], which is the same as approx. 0.04% of the Danish pop. Including those only occasionally or superficially participating in the religious groups' activities (what Beckford calls 'clients'), the total number of people involved with a new religious group in Denmark does not in my estimation exceed 15,000 which equals about 0.3% of the total pop. "
New Religionists - full-time Germany, West 64,200 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. "Another more detailed assessment for West Germany covering many more movements concludes that well over one million people are involved or 'influenced' by new religions, with a 'full-time' membership of 64,200. The estimated full time membership for 12 of these movements is: " [table]
new seekers USA - 10.00% - - 1994 Gallagher, Winifred. Working on God. New York: Random House (1999). [Orig. source: Robert Wuthnow, Sharing the Journey: Support Groups and America's New Quest for Community (New York: The Free Press, 1994)]; pg. 148. "Wade Clark Roof describes about 10 percent of the middle-aged as 'new seekers.' Even more turned off by habit, rules, dogma, and bureaucracy than other Americans, this small but significant group of spiritual-not-religious people find meaning in the heightened personal experiences of an inner journey. They regard all religions as true. They envision the soul as evolving toward union with--or perhaps being already part of--the divine, which is right here, not up there. "
New Testament Church of God USA - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 214. "New Testament Church of God... Mountain Home, AR [H.Q.]... was founded in 1942 by G. W. Pendleton and Martha Pendleton, his wife, both former members of the Church of God (Anderson, Indiana). They opposed the Church of God's cooperation and financial support of the National Council of Churches, but kept the doctrines of the parent body. The members hold camp meetings and state and regional conventions, publish gospel literature, and have regular radio broadcasts. Membership: No reported. Congregations are found across the U.S., but no membership count has been made. "
New Thought Maine - - - - 1835 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1993. "...the founder of New Thought, Phineas P. Quimby. Born in Lebanon, New Hampshire, in 1802, he spent the greater part of his life in Belfast, Maine, from where, as his ideas evolved, he went forth to lecture and demonstrate in surrounding towns. Eventually he opened an office in Portland, Maine, cured many hundreds of people of varied ailments and diseases, and gained a wide reputation as 'the Portland healer.' In his early 30s, Quimby fell ill... restored to his former health. After this experience, he resumed work, but questions continued to nag at him... "
New Thought world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1993. "The term New Thought, over the course of a hundred years or so, has come to describe a world-wide alliance of groups with similar ideas about man and his relation to an ultimate universal power. It is necessarily a loose association, for New Thought is neither Church, cult, nor sect, has no creed or dogma, is non-racial, requires no commitment and sets forth no rules of convention. It is, rather, an attempt to identify a change of belief that began to take shape around the middle of the 19th century in the New England states of America... the founder of New Thought, Phineas P. Quimby. "
New Thought world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1994. "Many groups have since grown up and proliferated throughout America, as well as Great Britain, Germany, France, Japan, Africa and elsewhere, some short-lived, some permanent and flourisihing, which are based on a common philosophical core. Alike as they appear to the uninitiated, the metaphysical variations between, for instance, Divine Science, the Unity School of Christianity, Religious Science (to name a few of the main groups), elude superficial definition and require careful study. One of the primary reasons why New Thought, as a movement, can well form an alliance (and in fact does so, as the International New Thought Alliance) but cannot so easily become an organization, is that its interpretations around a central theme are apt to be as individual as individuality itself. Groups form ceaselessly around the preferred ideas of a particular leader, and leaders constantly emerge, and probably always will... "
New Tribes Bolivia - - - - 1999 *LINK* "Soon, God's Word will echo throughout the majestic Andes... A New Messenger for the Quechua " in SIM NOW, April 1999 (vol. #86); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Although SIM is the owner and the ministry responsible for Radio Mosoj Chaski, the project would not have come this far without co-workers from Pioneers, New Tribes, and Quechuas for Christ. "
New Wiccan Church USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 75. "New Wiccan Church, National Office, P.O. Box 162046, Sacramento, CA 95816. Traditional British Wicca, Gardnerian, Alexandrian, etc.; Goddess and God worship; provides referrals to local groups throughout the US... "
New Wine Christian Center Illinois: Chicago 2,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Chicago, Illinois; pastor Tom Bynum.
New York Society for Ethical Culture world 1,150 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 257. "The New York Society for Ethical Culture grew steadily until it reached its present membership of 1150 persons. "
Newars Nepal 690,000 3.60% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 577. "Newars make up roughly 3.6% of Nepal's population, or some 690,000 people. More than two-thirds of this number are concentrated in the Kathmandu Valley. The remaining Newar are found spread through the eastern and western hill (Pahar) zones and the belt of lowlands in southern Nepal known as the Terai. "; "Newar religion is a mix of Mahayana Buddhism... Hinduism, and older animistic beliefs... "
Nez Perce Idaho 3,000 - - - 1980 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 74. "Nex Perce... They numbered 4,000 in 1780. Two centuries later, 3,000 are counted in the tribal census in Idaho. "
Nez Perce North America 4,000 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 74. "Nex Perce... They numbered 4,000 in 1780. "
Nez Perce USA 4,113 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Ngonia Zambia - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Ngqika South Africa - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Nguni South Africa - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Niantic - Western North America - Eastern Woodlands 600 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Niantic, Western (1600): 600; [Eastern Nanic listed separately, grouped with Naragansett]
Niantic - Western world 600 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Niantic, Western (1600): 600; [Eastern Nanic listed separately, grouped with Naragansett]
Nicene Creed Turkey - - - - 325 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 536. "Nicaea, Council of. The first ecumenical council of the church, which met in the ancient city of Nicaea (modern Iznik, Turkey), beginning on June 19, 325... was summoned by the first Christian emperor, Constantine, and concluding its work... The exact number of bishops who attended is not known, and no minutes of the proceedings are preserved. However, a highly apologetic letter of Eusebius of Caesarea (in Socrates, Ecclesiastical History 1.8.35) preserves the earliest text of the creed; and Athanasius of Alexandria (De Decretis 19-20) details some of the theological debate which led, for the first time in history, to the insertion of a nonscriptural term into a creed (Gr. Homoousios; 'of the same substance') to describe the relation of God to Christ... "
Nichiren Buddhism Japan - - - - 1300 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "NICHIREN BUDDHISM: Japanese MAHYNA BUDDHIST SECT which trace their origin to the thirteenth century Buddhist PRIEST NICHIREN who sought to restore what he saw as ORTHODOX Buddhism "
Nichiren Buddhism Japan - - - - 1350 C.E. Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 285. "Nichiren's followers have been called 'Buddhist Calvinists,' and are usually to be found among the petite bourgeoisie and lower classes. During the 14th century, they often engaged in pitched battles with Shinran's followers, usually farmers or townspeople. "
Nichiren Buddhism Japan 7,376,000 - 5,031
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 105. "There are at present eight branches in Japan, with 5,031 temples and 7,376,000 adherents. The Nichiren School proper and the Kempon-Hokke (Elucidating the Original Lotus) branch are the most influential. "
Nichiren Buddhism Japan - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 537. "Nichiren Buddhism... A group of Japanese Buddhist sects in the Mahayana tradition which trace their origin to the thirteenth century Japanese priest Nichiren... Next to Jodo Shin-shu... Nichiren Buddhism has the largest constituency of all religions in Japan today. There are currently eighteen Nichiren sects registered in the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). Offshoots of Nichiren Buddhism total nineteen, including the popular 'new religions' such as Reiyukai, Rissho Koseikai, and Myochikai Kyodan. "
Nichiren Buddhism Japan 31,427,310 25.20% - - 1993 O'Brien, J. & M. Palmer. The State of Religion Atlas. Simon & Schuster: New York (1993); pg. 26-27. "Shares of Buddhist sect membership in Japan, 1981: Tendai: 30%; Nichiren: 30%; Pure Land: 18%; Shingon: 10%; Zen: 8%; Nara: 4%. " Percentages and numbers made using est. of 84% of Japan being Buddhist, total pop. of country: 124,711,551 (1993).
Nichiren Buddhism Japan - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 285. "Today, many of Nichiren's followers in Japan belong to the Soka Gakkai, a... organization whose political arm, the Komei-to, or Clean-Government Party, has considerable strength in the National Diet. "
Nichiren Buddhism world - - - - 1900 Barrett, D. Sects, 'Cults', and Alternative Religions. London, UK: Blandford (1997); pg. 156. "Over the years, Nichiren's version of Buddhism split into many directions: by this century there were around 40 different Nichiren sects. "


Nichiren Buddhism, continued

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