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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to New Age, USA

New Age, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
New Age USA 20,000 - - - 1992 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 245. "A recent report suggests how tiny the New Age movement is. Based on Barry Kosmin's (1991) survey, discussed above, it can be estimated that 20,000 Americans regard their religious preference as New Age. Admittedly, some people who reported themselves to be Baptist or Lutherans take part in the New Age audience. But audiences do not constitute movements. And even this audience is probably not all that large. For example, the New Age Journal claimed an average circulation of fewer than 150,000 copies for 1990. "
New Age USA - - - - 1992 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 245. "...most people who can in any way be said to have responded to the New Age movement regard it as more of an amusement than a religion. Most are no more than casual dabblers in the various pseudo-scientific activities and techniques promoted as New Age. Indeed, we suspect that for all but a handful of committed participants, the New Age is an audience cult (Stark and Bainbridge, 1985) and reflects interest levels on a par with reading astrology columns. "
New Age USA - - - - 1998 *LINK* Mims, Bob. "Nontraditional Religions Growing Among Americans " in Salt Lake Tribune (Nov. 14, 1998). "Trying to gauge growth of so-called New Age faiths statistically is problematic given their frequent penchant for secrecy and dizzying variety. The New Age grouping includes everything from offshoots of Buddhism and Hinduism to spirit channelers, UFO societies, neo-paganism, astrology and shadowy apocalyptic sects springing up with the approach of the new millennium. Still, their attraction to Americans is easy to see by scanning the headlines of mainstream newspapers and supermarket tabloids alike, or viewing popular TV shows with homogenized spiritual or New Age themes such as 'Touched By An Angel,' 'Promised Land' or 'Early Edition.' "
New Age world - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 280. "With no membership lists or een a coherent philosphy or dogma, it is more difficult to define or measure the unorganized New Age movement. But in every major U.S. and European city thousands who seek insight and personal growth cluster around a metaphysical bookstore, a spiritual teacher, or an educational center. "
New Age world - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 280-281. "Most agree that the New Age has its roots in the human potential movement and that it has to do with a complex awareness--of the oneness of creation, the limitless potential of humanity, and the possibility of transforming the self and today's world into a better one.

Then again, it is easy to find a different voice. The true goal, says Ken Eyeer, head of the Northwest Foundation, whcih conducts 'A Course in Miracles,' 'is not to change the world, but to change yourself.'

New Age groups share no orthodox theology, but many adopt the East's belief in reincarnation. Unlike the Judeo-Christian God pictured far above humankind, there is a strong sense that humanity partakes of the divine. This drives fundamentalists mad. "

New Age world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "NEW AGE MOVEMENT: a movement which arose in the 1970s and gained notoriety in the 1980s... It began as a self-conscious movement with the publication of the East West Journal in 1971 and found its most forceful advocate in the writings of actress Shirley MACLAINE. "
New Age - channels California: Los Angeles 1,000 - - - 1987 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 281-282. "As early as 1987 the number of channels in the Los Angeles area alone was estimated at more than 1,000. "
New Age - channels USA 500 - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 281-282. "Dr. J. Gordon Melton, editor of The Encyclopedia of American Religions, estimates that nationwide there are perhaps 400 to 500 channels. 'Centered in New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco, there aren't many in between,' he says. Dr. Melton's research has apparently not led him to visit Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Florida, or Virginia--all hotbeds of New Age activity, each claiming numerous channels or other psychics. As early as 1987 the number of channels in the Los Angeles area alone was estimated at more than 1,000. "
New Age - channels USA - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 281. "...New Age... channel mediums--individuals who say they permit their bodies and voices to be used as vehicles for teachers and messages from the great beyond--and sometimes grab a lot of the headlines.

Charlene Pittman, in Tampa, channels for the spirit named Boyaed, a teacher born in India A.D. 324.

Jack Pursel of San Fancisco grosses more than $1 million a year in seminars, counseling, and videocassettes as the channel for 'Lazaris, the consummate friend.'

J. Z. Knight, a women [sic] channels Ramtha, a thirty-five-thousand-year-old man. Some reportedly pay $1,500 to attend her seminars... "

New Age - other New Zealand 531 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1996 NZ population: 3,616,633. Listed in table as "Other New Age religions not classified elsewhere "
New Age/Spiritualism New Zealand 681 0.02% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1996 NZ population: 3,616,633. Listed in table as "Spiritualism and New Age not further defined "; "Spiritualism " by itself is a separate category, as is "Other New Age religions not classified elsewhere ", so it is not entirely clear what is meant by this group label.
New Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - - - - 1966 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 21-22. "The third division came in 1966 when a group of so-called New Order Amish left the Amish fold over differences related to the use of modern farm machinery. This faction subsequently splintered into several subgroups of New Order Amish, which vary in dres andin the use of cars, tractors, electricity, and church buildings. The various pockets of progressive Amish groups [including Beachy, which predates 'New Order Amish'] in the Lancaster area number less than one thousand members. "
New Amish Pennsylvania: Mifflin County - - - - 1980 Hostetler, John A. Amish Society (3rd ed.; 1st ed. pub. 1963). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1980); pg. 282, 286-287. "...Mifflin County in central Pennsylvania. This region encompasses Kishacoquillas Valley..., which has in it 12 Amish-related groups. All originated in whole or in part among the Amish who came to this region from southeastern Pennsylvania as early as 1791... The 'New Amish' or Old Order Valley District (the official name) emerged in 1972 when members began to to study and articulate the meaning of salvation, especially assurance salvation... The New Amish group was greatly diminished when its bishop Christian Peachey with many members joined the Holdeman group in 1979. "
New Amish USA - - - - 1966 Hostetler, John A. Amish Society (3rd ed.; 1st ed. pub. 1963). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1980); pg. 277. "...a group called the 'New Amish' began to emerge in 1966 in Pennsylvania and Ohio. The movement for a 'new order' occurred among families that favored telephones, tractor-driven farm machinery, and power-driven generators for cooling bulk milk. Their members also speak out against the use of tobacco and emphasize a 'cleaner' life style and conduct. The New Amish continue to meet to worship in their homes. They differ from the Beachy Amish in that they do not permit automobiles or meeting houses. "
New and Latter House of Israel United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
1
country
1885 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. . "...the founder, James Jershom Jezreel... arrived in Gillingham [in Kent, England] in 1875 as James White... soon gathered around him a group of faithful followers & was able to move into Woodlands -- a large house in Gillingham... opened a school which taught a very narrow curriculum largely based upon Jezreel's own writings... The school and the centre at Woodlands drew the movement together in Gillingham, and converts in other places sold up their belongings and came to join the community... The organization was never very large but it attracted a number of wealthy people who put their entire fortunes at the disposal of Jezreel. Soon he conceived of a great temple which would serve as the focal point for his new religious community. Land was bought high above the Medway River and, after the builder had modified the original plans, the work was under way... In 1885 the foundations had been laid and building began when... Jezreel... died and and the sect was thrown into disarray. "
New and Latter House of Israel United Kingdom: England - - - 1
country
1888 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1514. "In 1885... Jezreel... died and and the sect was thrown into disarray... Jezreel's widow, now named Queen Esther... gained control...lacking in... organizational ability... People who had given all their money to the movement demanded it back... The society was threatened with schism and the threat became a reality when one faction seceded and moved to London. Work on the temlpe was held up when the builders demanded their money, and finally stopped when the money was not forthcoming... Esther... died in 1888. Serious dissension broke out among the remaining followers of Jezreel and the movement split into warring groups... There was a short revival of fortunes when an American calling himself Prince Michael arrived to claim leadership, but his endeavours to reestablish the New and Latter House of Israel met with no lasting success. "
New and Latter House of Israel United Kingdom: England - - - 1
country
1960 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1514. "The New and Latter House of Israel, also known as the Jezreels or Jezreelites, were a minor religious sect of the 19th century. Until 1960 the terraced houses of Upper Gillingham in Kent were overshadowed by their headquarters, a great ruined hulk of a building. "
New and Latter House of Israel United Kingdom: England 0 0.00% - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1514. "The London secessionists carried on and up to the late 1950's bearded speakers at Hyde Park Corner were still telling of the wonders of the Flying Roll. They disclaimed any connection with the Gillingham believers who lingered on, their temple uncompleted and derelict; in 1960 the edifice was destroyed. Although the New and Latter House of Israel has ceased to exist, buses still stop at 'the Jezreels', copies of the Flying Roll can still be bought, and James Jershom Jezreel is still reckoned as the Sixth Trumpeter by the present followers of Joanna Southcott, the Panacea Society of Bedford. "
New Apostolic Church Australia 2,485 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "New Apostolic Church "]
New Apostolic Church Belarus - - 8
units
- 1993 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 63. "In 1993, there were about 1,500 religious congregations in Belarus, including 787 Orthodox, 305 Roman Catholic, 170 Pentecostal, 141 Baptist, 26 Old Believer... 17 Seventh-Day Adventist, 9 Apostolic Christian, 8 Uniate, 8 New Apostolic, 8 Muslim, 7 Jewish, and 15 others. "
New Apostolic Church Germany 395,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Neuapostolische Kirche " in table. Source: REMID.
New Apostolic Church South Africa 160,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
New Apostolic Church USA 30,010 - 420
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 172. "Work 'along broader interior and missionary lines' is conducted in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. has 30,010 members in 337 churches and 83 missions... "
New Apostolic Church USA 39,816 - 523
units
- 1991 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "National Organization of the New Apostolic Church of North America. "
New Apostolic Church USA 33,405 - 412
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Listed as "New Apostolic Church of North America "; 33,405 members in 375 churches and 37 missions
New Apostolic Church USA 41,863 - 554
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.; Listed as "National Organization of the New Apostolic Church of North America "
New Apostolic Church USA 41,863 - 554
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Natl. Organization of the New Apostolic Ch. of North America
New Apostolic Church USA 42,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); "last updated October 1998 " Table: "Christian Organizations "; "Membership numbers, as supplied by various denominations "; Listed as "National Organization of the New Apostolic Church of North America "
New Apostolic Church world 4,000,000 - 31,574
units
184
countries
1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 172. "Work 'along broader interior and missionary lines' is conducted in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, and Puerto Rico. The U.S. has 30,010 members in 337 churches and 83 missions; the international organization, more than 4 million in 31,574 branches, in 184 countries and islands. "
New Apostolic Church world 7,500,000 - 52,000
units
184
countries
1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). 7.5 million members in 52,000 branches in 184 countries
New Apostolic Church world 9,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "New Apostolic Church - International "; web page: "The New Apostolic Church: Decentralised Structures and Duties of Ministries " (viewed 1 March 1999). The New Apostolic Church is established in almost all the countries on this earth. Around the globe there are more than nine million members from all age groups and areas of society.
New Apostolic Church Zambia - 5.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions " [Listed in table as "New Apostolic "]
New Asian religions North America 850,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long circa 1998. "Smaller religious blocs have a higher growth rate: 800,000 Bahais (2.46%), 156,000 Spiritists (1.81%), 850,000 Chinese folk-religionists (1.11%), 740,000 Asian New Religions (2.2%), and 520,000 Sikhs (2.66%). "
New Asian religions world 106,000,000 2.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998) [Original sources: J.W. Wright, Editor, The Universal Almanac, 1996, Andrews & McMeel, Kansas City. Greg H. Parsons, Executive Director, "U.S. Center for World Mission, " Pasadena, CA; quoted in Zondervan News Service, 1997-FEB-21.] Table: "Number of Adherents of World Religions "
New Beginnings Christian Center Oregon: Portland 2,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Portland, OR; pastor Larry Huch.
New Bethel Church of God in Christ (Pentecostal) world - - - - 1927 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Apostolic Pentecostals; pg. 266. "In 1927, the Rev. A.D. Bradley was admonished by the board of bishops of the Church of God in Christ to refrain from preaching 'Jesus only' doctrine... He refused, and... established the New Bethel Church of God in Christ (Pentecostal)... Membership: Not reported. "
New Birth/Total Church China - - 3,500
units
- 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994); pg. 149. "...Xu Yongze from the Nanyang District, who was arrested on his way to see Bily Graham in Beijing in April 1988, was reportedly leader of such a network of 3,500 independent house-churches centered in Henan. Known popularly as the New Birth sect or the Total Church, they... continue to operate underground seminaries and to send out large numbers of evangelists to more than twenty provinces. "
New Churches (Swedenborgian) Australia 504 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "New Churches (Swedenborgian) "]
New Churches (Swedenborgian) Australia 500 - 7
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "New Church in Australia (The): This religious association originated in London in 1787 and was inspired by the Theological writings of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772)... This association arrived in Australia in 1832. There are now seven centres for an estimated number of five hundred members. "
New Churches (Swedenborgian) world 50,000 - 300
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "So far, 65 religious groups and associations have completed a questionnaire and are listed below... New Church in Australia (The): This religious association originated in London in 1787 and was inspired by the Theological writings of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772). Worldwide, this movement has more than 300 centres and 50,000 thousand members... This Church has also some links with The General Church of the New Jerusalem (also known as New Church Hurstville Society) "
New Congregational Methodist Church Florida - - 6
units
- 1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 192. "New Congregational Methodist Church... Jacksonville, FL... Membership: Not reported. In 1967 there were 13 congregations (7 in Georgia and 6 in Florida). "
New Congregational Methodist Church Georgia, USA - - 7
units
- 1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 192. "New Congregational Methodist Church... Jacksonville, FL... Membership: Not reported. In 1967 there were 13 congregations (7 in Georgia and 6 in Florida). "
New Congregational Methodist Church USA 1,500 - 25
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 341. Table: "...the leading holiness groups in the United States at the present time are as follows: " [Table lists figures for "Churches " and "Members " for 28 groups.]
New Congregational Methodist Church USA - - 13
units
- 1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 192. "New Congregational Methodist Church... Jacksonville, FL... Membership: Not reported. In 1967 there were 13 congregations (7 in Georgia and 6 in Florida). "
New Congregational Methodist Church world - - 13
units
1
country
1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 192. "New Congregational Methodist Church... Jacksonville, FL... Membership: Not reported. In 1967 there were 13 congregations (7 in Georgia and 6 in Florida). "
New Covenant Church of God Bulgaria - - 1
unit
- 1996 *LINK* web site (1998): "Information on Latter Day Saint Movement (Restoration Theology) Religions " by David Bowie; "Quoting from a letter on New Covenant Church of God stationery from Christopher C. Warren, Presiding Patriarch, dated 21 January 1996 " "The New Covenant Church of God/Guds Nye Pakts Kirke... The Church does not publish membership statistics. There are four congregations in Norway, one in the Ukraine, and one in Bulgaria. "
New Covenant Church of God Norway - - 4
units
- 1996 *LINK* web site (1998): "Information on Latter Day Saint Movement (Restoration Theology) Religions " by David Bowie; "Quoting from a letter on New Covenant Church of God stationery from Christopher C. Warren, Presiding Patriarch, dated 21 January 1996 " "The New Covenant Church of God/Guds Nye Pakts Kirke... The Church does not publish membership statistics. There are four congregations in Norway, one in the Ukraine, and one in Bulgaria. "
New Covenant Church of God Ukraine - - 1
unit
- 1996 *LINK* web site (1998): "Information on Latter Day Saint Movement (Restoration Theology) Religions " by David Bowie; "Quoting from a letter on New Covenant Church of God stationery from Christopher C. Warren, Presiding Patriarch, dated 21 January 1996 " "The New Covenant Church of God/Guds Nye Pakts Kirke... The Church does not publish membership statistics. There are four congregations in Norway, one in the Ukraine, and one in Bulgaria. "
New Covenant Church of God world - - 6
units
3
countries
1996 *LINK* web site (1998): "Information on Latter Day Saint Movement (Restoration Theology) Religions " by David Bowie; "Quoting from a letter on New Covenant Church of God stationery from Christopher C. Warren, Presiding Patriarch, dated 21 January 1996 " "The New Covenant Church of God/Guds Nye Pakts Kirke... The Church does not publish membership statistics. There are four congregations in Norway, one in the Ukraine, and one in Bulgaria. There used to be small congregations in the USA, England, and Denmark but these no longer exist. There are investigators in several countries... "
New Covenant Churches of Maryland Maryland - - 24
units
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Latter Rain Pentecostals; pg. 290. "New Covenant Churches of Maryland... Arnold, MD [H.Q.]... is a fellowship of churches which emerged in the mid-1970s... originally centered upon the New Life Christian Center in Arnold, MD... Membership: In 1984, there were 24 congregations... "
New Frontiers International world - - 200
units
15
countries
1998 *LINK* official web site Christianity:Protestant:Evangelical:New Frontiers:
NFI is a family of nearly 200 churches based in the following nations: Cyprus, Denmark, France, Germany, Ghana, Holland, India, Mexico, Russia, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Switzerland, UAE, UK and USA.
New Frontiers International world - - 200
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site of "Kings Church, Enfield which is just one of the churches associated with NFI "; web page: "New Frontiers International Churches with Web Pages " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) Christianity:Protestant:Evangelical:New Frontiers:
"New Frontiers International is a group of around 200 churches worldwide.We are Evangelical... "
New Generation Russia 1,500 - 8
units
- 1998 "Restrictions on Religion Get Uneven Enforcement " in Christianity Today (Apr. 6, 1998); pg. 20. "New Generation, a Pentecostal group... today has 1500 members and eight congregations. "
New Hope Baptist Association Alabama 155 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 127. [Listed as 'New Hope Baptist Association.']
New Hope Baptist Association Georgia, USA 2,995 0.05% 21
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 2,332. [Listed as 'New Hope Baptist Association.']
New Hope Baptist Association USA 3,150 - 22
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'New Hope Baptist Association.']
New Hope Baptist Church Georgia: Atlanta 2,500 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Atlanta, GA; pastor John Avant.
New Hope Community Church Oregon: Portland 5,200 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table, grouped by state, columns for city, state, "size " (avg. weekly attendance), etc. From study finding all U.S. megachurches (congreg. w/ "consistent weekly attendance of at least 2,000 persons "); an independent, pastor Dale Galloway.
New Hope Community Church world 5,000 - - - 1991 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992); pg. 282. "Pehaps the nation's most effective cell ministry of this type is administered by the Rev. Dale Galloway at New Hope Community Church. This megachurch has more than 5,000 members and a 3,000-seat sanctuary... Portland, OR. "
New Kadampa Tradition Australia - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Directory of NKT Centers for Asia, Australasia and America " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999). counted listings on directory. Perth, Western Australia; Queensland
New Kadampa Tradition Australia: Queensland - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Directory of NKT Centers for Asia, Australasia and America " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999). counted listings on directory. Perth, Western Australia; Queensland
New Kadampa Tradition Australia: Western Australia - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Directory of NKT Centers for Asia, Australasia and America " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999). counted listings on directory. Perth, Western Australia; Queensland
New Kadampa Tradition Belgium - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Directory of European NKT Centres " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999). counted listings on directory.
New Kadampa Tradition Brazil - - 6
units
- 1999 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Directory of NKT Centers for Asia, Australasia and America " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999). counted listings on directory.
New Kadampa Tradition British Columbia - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Directory of NKT Centers for Asia, Australasia and America " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999). counted listings on directory.


New Kadampa Tradition, continued

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