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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Neo-Paganism, world

Neo-Paganism, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Neo-Paganism world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 73. "[Neo-Pagan] Traditions. Alexandrians - see New Wiccan Church; Dianics - see Circle of Aradia; Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess; Susan B. Anthony Coven #1; Druid - see Ar nDraiocht Fein; Reformed Druids of North America; Gardnerian - see New Wiccan Church; Georgian - see the Georgian Church; Native American - see The Bear Tribe; Caney Indian Spiritual Circle; Sunray Meditation Society "
Neo-Paganism world 300,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* New York Times News Service. "Neo-pagan movement is bewitching to many " in Deseret News, 31 Oct. 1999 (v. online). "Encouraged by federal court rulings recognizing witchcraft as a legal religion, an increasing number of books related to the subject, and the continuing cultural concern for the environment, Wicca ?as contemporary witchcraft is often called ?has been growing in the United States and abroad. It is a major element in an expanding 'neo-pagan' movement whose members regard nature itself as charged with divinity. Given the movement's diversity, without essential texts, no central authorities and many solitary practitioners, estimates of how many people fit under the pagan umbrella vary widely, from 100,000 to three or more times that number. Some have found historical antecedents for their beliefs and work to re-create ancient Egyptian or Greek religions; some call themselves Druids. "
Neo-Paganism world 3,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Walker, Wren & Fritz Jung. "Witches' Voice " web site; "Welcome Members of the Press " page (viewed 6 Oct. 1999). Written 1 Oct. 1999. "HOW many Witches, Wiccans and pagans are there? No one knows for sure but we do know that the number is increasing rapidly. Our best estimate here at The Witches' Voice is about 1 million in the U.S. and 3 million worldwide. Adherents.Com estimates about million Neo-pagans worldwide in its list of the world's major religions. "
Neo-Paganism world - - - - 2000 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher (compiler). "World View: Pagans Want Pope To Say Sorry " in Salt Lake Tribune (12 Feb 2000) [Original source: AP] "More than 1,600 pagans and their supporters have signed a letter to Pope John Paul II calling for the inclusion of pagans with Protestants and Jews in any Vatican apology for the Inquisition. Released by the Montgomery-based Pagans in Action: Council for Truth, a coalition of pagan groups worldwide... "
Neo-Paganism Wyoming 2,800 - - - 1992 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 9. Table: "Distribution of Neo-Pagans Participating in Neo-Pagan Census in U.S. "; Cols: State; Number [of Census participants]; % [of particpants]; Pg. xvi: "[Received] more than 2,000 responses... survey was distributed through Wiccan & Neo-Pagan organizations..., published in journals,.. Internet [&] at festivals. [unable] to guarantee that the survey was randomly distributed. "; Pg. 10: "...actual % by state are at best an approximation. "; Raw number presented here based on state % from this table, as a portion of estimated 200,000 [1992] U.S. total (pg. 9).; Wyoming %: 1.4
Neo-Paganism - attended festival USA 20,000 - - - 1986 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 75-76. "In 'The Pagan Census' [1995] we found that 42% had attended one or more festivals that year; 57.1% of the respondents had not attended a festival in the preceding year; 0.9% did not respond to this question (H. Berger et al. n.d.). Our survey suggests that a larger proportion of Neo-Pagans attend festivals than Adler estimated (1986). Based on her sense of the Neo-Pagan community, she suggested that approximately 10% of Neo-Pagans attend festivals. The difference between our findings and "Adler's estimate may be a changing pattern of attendance among Neo-Pagans in the last decade, an underestimate on her part, or the result of our sample being skewed because it was not randomly distributed. " [1992 estimate cited in book, pg. 9 & pg. 132, indicate total Neo-Pagan population of U.S. at 200,000.]
Neo-Paganism - attended festival USA 84,000 - - - 1994 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 75-76. "In 'The Pagan Census' [1995] we found that 42% had attended one or more festivals that year; 57.1% of the respondents had not attended a festival in the preceding year; 0.9% did not respond to this question (H. Berger et al. n.d.). " [1992 estimate cited in book, pg. 9 & pg. 132, indicate total Neo-Pagan population of U.S. at 200,000.]
Neo-Paganism - attended festival USA 84,000 - - - 1995 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 75-76. "In 'The Pagan Census' [1995] we found that 42% had attended one or more festivals that year... (H. Berger et al. n.d.). " [1992 estimate cited in book, pg. 9 & pg. 132, indicate total Neo-Pagan population of U.S. at 200,000.]
Neo-Paganism - solo practitioners USA 100,800 - - - 1992 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 50. "Not all Witches belong to a coven; some individuals practice alone or with a romantic partner. 'The Pagan Census' found that 50.4% of the respondents were at the time of the survey solo practitioners (H. Berger et al. n.d.). " [1992 estimate cited in book, pg. 9 & pg. 132, indicate total Neo-Pagan population of U.S. at 200,000.]
Neoagnostics USA - 33.00% - - 1993 Gallagher, Winifred. Working on God. New York: Random House (1999) [Orig. source: Wade Clark Roof, A Generation of Seekers: The Spiritual Journeys of the Baby Boom Generation (San Francisco: Harper-Collins, 1993)]; pg. 16. "In what might be a head count of neoagnostics, sociologist Wade Clark Roof estimates that upwards of a third of baby boomers 'affirm in one way or another a divine power or presence, even if they admit to uncertainty in their belief,' and even though they also entertain 'individualistic meaning systems,' and remain 'highly secularized in their conceptions of the forces governing life.' "
Neoagnostics USA - - - - 1999 Gallagher, Winifred. Working on God. New York: Random House (1999). [Original source for 5% atheist and agnostic figure: George H. Gallup, Jr. Religion in America (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton Religion Research Center, 1996).]; pg. xv. "Modern America's brightest and best have long been encouraged to disparage the question and to think of churches and temples as places where one's brains are checked at the door. Some are atheists or true agnostics, who've concluded that even if God exists, which can't be proved, God can't be known. When combined, however, these two groups number fewer than 5% of Americans. To their right, but well to the left of traditional believers, sits the much bigger, fuzzier group of neoagnostics. "
Nepal Baptist Christian Council Nepal 5,000 - 40
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Nestorian Assyria - 19.00% - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Assyria Online! "; web page: "Brief History of the Asyrians " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999), by Peter BetBasoo. Pie chart graphic: "Approximation by Assyria Online " "Assyria is located in north Mesopotamia and spans 4 countries: In Syria it extends west to the Euphrates river; in Turkey it extends north to Harran, Edessa, Diyarbakir, and Lake Van; in Iran it extends east to Lake Urmi, and in Iraq it extends to about 100 miles south of Kirkuk. "; Pie chart: "Chaldean 45%; Syriac Orthodox 26%; Church of the East 19%; Other 6%; Syriac Catholic 4%. "
Nestorian India: Kerala 100,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Syro-Malabar Catholic Mission "; web page: "Church History " (viewed 23 July 1999). "Note: The figures given above are approximate, worked out from various sources. The exact numbers are not readily available. " Table: "Christian Denominations in Kerala "; "Other Christians [other than Catholics]: Syrian Orthodox (Methran Kakshi) -1,100,000; Jacobite Syrian Orthodox (Bava Kakshi) - 1,000,000; Independent Jacobites (Thozhiyur) - 9,000; Marthomites - 500,000; St. Thomas Evangelical & Others - 10,000; Church of the East (Nestorians/Surais) - 100,000; Church of South India (CSI) and other Protestants - 700,000 "
Nestorian Iran 25,000 - - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD, 1979 edition); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) There remain [of Christians]: Armenians 108,000; Nestorian 25,000; Roman Catholics 21,000
Nestorian Iraq 35,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 221. "Nestorians: Followers of a Church that grew up in Syria, Mesopotamia and Iran in the 5th century. Adheres to the teachings of Nestorius of Cilicia (d. 431). Around 35,000 live toay in Iraq and north-eastern Iran, and 15,000 in Syria and Lebanon. "
Nestorian Middle East 50,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 221. "Nestorians: Followers of a Church that grew up in Syria, Mesopotamia and Iran in the 5th century. Adheres to the teachings of Nestorius of Cilicia (d. 431). Around 35,000 live toay in Iraq and north-eastern Iran, and 15,000 in Syria and Lebanon. "
Nestorian Roman Empire - - - - 450 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "NESTORIANISM: a religious and PHILOSOPHICAL movement which emerged in Graeco-Roman society as a blend of essentially PLATONIC, PYTHAGOREAN, STOIC, and ARISTOTELIAN elements: its chief exponent was PLOTINUS. The philosophy had a strong MYSTICAL inclination and was easily adapted to the needs of CHRISTIAN thinkers seeking to reconcile Christian and PAGAN thought. "
Nestorian USA 6,000 - - - 1940 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 995-996. "In 1940 the 119th patriarch of the Church of the East and Assyrians (Mar Eshai Shimum XXIII) took residence in the United States among the 3,000 or so of his coreligionists in this country. "
Nestorian USA - - 12
units
- 1978 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 81. Listed in text as "Nestorians/The Church of the East "
Nestorian world - - - - 450 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 471. "This subject became controversial in the 5th century. The Nestorians were accused of splitting Christ into a dual personality, but denied the charge. "
Nestorian world - - - - 500 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 471. "[after the] Council of Chalcedon in 451 AD... The Syrian churches divided and the Nestorian branch, driven out of the Greek empire, won a following in Persia, India and China. "
Nestorian world - - - - 650 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 536. "Nestorianism (Christian). A movement which espoused the 'two-natures' Christology... East Syrian (or Assyrian) Christianity became the carrier of the Nestorian tradition in the fifth century, although they did not officially designate their church as 'Nestorian' until the thirteenth century. By the seventh century Nestorians had spread to Persia, Central Asia, and even China. "
Nestorian world 250,000 - - - 1940 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 995-996. "In 1940 the 119th [Nestorian] patriarch... took residence in the U.S. among the 3,000 or so of his coreligionists in this country. All over the world perhaps as many as 250,000 other Nestorian faithful have in some way recognized his authority. "
Nestorian world 80,000 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 136. "Chaldean (Persian) Rite:... Variants of this rite are followed by the Nestorians in Mesopotamia and Persia with 80,000 members and by the Mellusians in India with 15,000. "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations California 27 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 18. [Listed as 'Netherlands Reformed Congregations.']
Netherlands Reformed Congregations Canada 3,300 - 10
units
- 1985 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 159. "Membership:...There were an additional 3,300 members in 10 congregations in Canada... "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations Canada 4,660 - 9
units
- 1991 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 244-247. Table 1: Canadian Current Statistics. (# of adherents is from table's "inclusive membership " column, not the sometimes smaller "full communicant or confirmed members " col.) Listed in table as "Netherlands Reformed Congregations of North America. "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations Illinois 16 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 10. [Listed as 'Netherlands Reformed Congregations.']
Netherlands Reformed Congregations Iowa 1,525 0.06% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 787. [Listed as 'Netherlands Reformed Congregations.']
Netherlands Reformed Congregations Michigan 1,817 0.02% 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 1,025. [Listed as 'Netherlands Reformed Congregations.']
Netherlands Reformed Congregations Netherlands 90,000 - 162
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 212. "Netherlands Reformed Congregations... With 26 congregations and 9,462 members in North America, this Reformed body is associated with 162 like-minded congregations and 90,000 members in the Netherlands. "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations Netherlands 90,000 - 162
units
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 158. "The Netherlands Reformed Congregations, presently numbering 162 congregations in the Netherlands (90,000 members), 25 congr. in North America (10,000 members) and a handfull of congr. in various other countries, organized denominationally in 1907. "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations Netherlands 90,000 - 162
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). -
Netherlands Reformed Congregations New Jersey 964 0.01% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 538. [Listed as 'Netherlands Reformed Congregations.']
Netherlands Reformed Congregations North America 8,300 - 26
units
- 1985 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 159. "Membership: In 1985 the church reported 5,000 members in 16 congregations in the U.S. There were an additional 3,300 members in 10 congregations in Canada... "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations North America 9,462 - 26
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 212. "Netherlands Reformed Congregations... With 26 congregations and 9,462 members in North America, this Reformed body is associated with 162 like-minded congregations and 90,000 members in the Netherlands. "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations North America 9,462 - 26
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). -
Netherlands Reformed Congregations North America 8,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Reformed.Net " (1998) Page created 1997 by Daniel Knight. Graphs: "Dutch Reformed Denominational Membership: North America and Netherlands "; "Data from denominational sources where possible. " [Note: figures here estimated from graphs]
Netherlands Reformed Congregations South Dakota 256 0.04% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 118. [Listed as 'Netherlands Reformed Congregations.']
Netherlands Reformed Congregations USA 5,000 - 16
units
- 1985 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 159. "Membership: In 1985 the church reported 5,000 members in 16 congregations in the U.S. "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations USA 5,169 - 15
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Netherlands Reformed Congregations.']
Netherlands Reformed Congregations USA 5,250 - 15
units
- 1991 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Netherlands Reformed Congregations. "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations USA 10,000 - 25
units
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 158. "The Netherlands Reformed Congregations, presently numbering 162 congregations in the Netherlands (90,000 members), 25 congr. in North America (10,000 members) and a handfull of congr. in various other countries, organized denominationally in 1907. "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations USA 8,753 - 23
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Netherlands Reformed Congregations
Netherlands Reformed Congregations Washington 290 0.01% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 134. [Listed as 'Netherlands Reformed Congregations.']
Netherlands Reformed Congregations Wisconsin 274 0.01% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 139. [Listed as 'Netherlands Reformed Congregations.']
Netherlands Reformed Congregations world 100,000 - - 8
countries
1985 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 159. "Netherlands Reformed Congregations... Grand Rapids, MI [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1985 the church reported 5,000 members in 16 congregations in the U.S. There were an additional 3,300 members in 10 congregations in Canada and more than 100,000 members worldwide, primarily in the Netherlands. Foreign congregations were located in Australia, Indonesia, New Zealand, Nigeria, and South Africa. "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations world 99,462 - 188
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 212. "Netherlands Reformed Congregations... With 26 congregations and 9,462 members in North America, this Reformed body is associated with 162 like-minded congregations and 90,000 members in the Netherlands. "
Netherlands Reformed Congregations world 100,000 - 187
units
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 158. "The Netherlands Reformed Congregations, presently numbering 162 congregations in the Netherlands (90,000 members), 25 congr. in North America (10,000 members) and a handfull of congr. in various other countries, organized denominationally in 1907. "
network marketing USA 10,000,000 - - - 1999 Television show: 60 Minutes. Broadcast 9 May 1999. [Story about IHI: International Heritage] "As many as ten million Americans take part in this thing called 'network marketing.' Some of them are legitimate. Some are not... "
Neutrals North America - Eastern Woodlands 10,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Neutrals world 10,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Neverdies West Virginia - - - 1
country
1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Other Pentecostals; pg. 299. "Neverdies... Known locally in the communities of West Virginia as the Church of the Living Gospel or the Church of the Everlasting Gospel, the Neverdies are Pentecostals who believe in immortality not only of the soul but also of the body. The soul, the believe, returns to earth in a series of reincarnations until it succeeds in living a perfect life. At that point, the boy can live forever. THe origin of the group has been lost, but among the first teachers was Ted Oiler, born in 1906, who in 1973 was still traveling a circuit through the mountains of Virginia and North Carolina. The congregations are rather loosely knit, held together by their acceptance of what is a rather unusual doctrine for the mountain area. Among the leaders is Rev. Henry Holstine of Charleston, West Virginia. "
New Afrikan People's Organization USA - - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 135. "Other Left-Wing Activity. Although only fringe, fragmented organizations, several other left-wing extremist groups still exist:

The New Afrikan People's Organization (NAPO). Committed to building a black separatist state in the deep South, NAPO operates largely from prisons and has affilations with the Black Liberation Army and other prison left-wing extremist groups. 'NAPO is fully committed to the building of a sovereign socialist Black nation--the Republic of New Afrika . . . and seeks to free the land by any means necessary,' says its statement in principles. The group is also reportedl providing paramilitary training to black youths. "

New Age Canada 1,200 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Canada Census The Canadian Census (1991) recorded only 1,200 people (0.005%) who identify their religion as being New Age. However, this in no way indicates the influence of new age ideas in the country.
New Age Canada 4,100 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Interactive Bible " (ultra-conservative Evangelical); web page: "Statistics of Religion in North America " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999); Web page by: Steve Rudd, 33 Highcliffe Ave., Hamilton, Ontario Canada L9A 3L3 Table: "[NRMs] in Canada: Membership numbers "; "Scientologist 700; Hare Krishna 450; Moonies 650; Children of god 250; New age type groups 4100 "
New Age Maryland - 6.00% - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 280. "According to Maryland Poll, a semiannual study conducted by the University of Maryland, 6 percent of Marylanders identify with the [New Age] movement. Those numbers compete with any Protestant denomination. "
New Age New Zealand 1,212 0.03% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1996 NZ population: 3,616,633. This figure for simply "New Age " combines total for groups in table listed as "Spiritualism and New Age not further defined " ( "Spiritualism " by itself is a separate category), and is "Other New Age religions not classified elsewhere "
New Age USA 20,000 - - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 15-17. Table 1-2: Self-Described Adherence of U.S. Adult Population 1990. Phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by Graduate School of City U. of New York.
New Age USA 20,000,000 - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 293. "By head count, New Agers are a good, substantial lot, maybe 10 to 12 million. Say they are even 20 million. They are still completely outnumbered by [born-again Christians]... If you are out to sell your products, why even bother with the New Agers? To begin with they are rich. NInety-five percent of the readers of New Age Journal are college-educated, with average household incomes of $47,500. New Agers represent the most affluent, well-educated, successful segment of the baby boom. Furthermore, the influence on the culture as a whole extends beyond their numbers. This group, says John Garrett of SRI International's Values and Lifestyle (VALS) Program, tends 'to set the trends in America.' "
New Age USA - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 270. "At the dawn of the third millennium there are unmistakable signs of a worldwide multidenominational religious revival. American baby boomers who rejected organized religion in the 1970's are returning to church with their children in tow or joining the New Age movement. "
New Age USA - 10.00% - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 280. "Though hard to pin down, researchers estimate New Agers represent 5 to 10 percent of the population. "
New Age USA - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 280. "Though rare in the Bible Belt, concentrations of New Agers in East or West Coast cities or in the Southwest could easily total 12 to 15 percent. "
New Age USA 30,000 - - - 1992 Bloom, Harold. The American Religion: The Emergence of the Post-Christian Nation. New York: Simon & Schuster (1992); pg. 181. "Though the New Age cults have no more than about thirty thousand members, their fellow travelers are an untold multitude. "


New Age, continued

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