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43,874 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Native Americans, USA

Native Americans, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Native Americans USA - - - - 1968 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 191. "In 1968, the American Indian Movement (AIM) was created to raise the banner of 'red power.' The mood was intensified by activist Vine Deloria, Jr.'s Custer Died For Your Sins (1969), and Dee Brown's Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee (1971), which portrayed Indians as victims in American history. "
Native Americans USA 1,420,400 - - - 1980 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 19. "1,420,400 Indians counted in 1980 [census]. "
Native Americans USA 1,959,234 - - - 1990 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 312, 315. "Native North Americans: Alternate Names: Indians: Location: United States; Canada; Population: 1,959,234 (US); 1,016,335 (Canada) "; Pg. 315: "According the 1990 Census, the total population of Native North Americans in the US was 1,959,234. The Canadian Census of 1991 counted a total of 1,016,335 Native North Americans, including about 500,000 North American Indians; 480,000 Metis and nonstatus Indians; and approximatley 35,000 Inuit. [NOTE: This is an ethnic statistic, NOT a measure of how many people practice traditional Native American religion.]
Native Americans USA - 0.80% - - 1990 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 315. "Native North Americans currently make up about 0.8% of the total US population, and 3.4% of the total Canadian population. "
Native Americans USA 1,959,234 0.80% - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 17. "In 1990, through the Census Bureau's system of self-identifying, there were 1,959,234 individuals identified as Indians, including Alaska Natives. This is 0.8% of the total U.S. population of 248,709,873. The 'Indian' population breaks down ethnologically as 23,797 Aleuts, 57,152 Eskimos, and 1,878,284 Indians. "
Native Americans USA 1,878,285 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; "Native American Population:1,878,285 = 100.0% "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Native Americans USA - - - - 1993 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 12. "From a strictly ethnographic standpoint, if a person is, say, 3/4 Caucasian and 1/4 Indian, that person would normally not be considered an Indian. Yet, for many legal and social purposes, such a person will be an Indian, as might someone with a lesser quantum of Indian blood (Cohen 1982). "
Native Americans USA - - - - 1993 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 88. "By various means, Chrisianity has made enormous inroads into Native society over the last five hundred years. Among some groups, like the Aleut who were thoroughly converted to the Russian Orthodox Church in the 19th century, few if any traditionalists remain. Today most (but certainly not all) religious Native people practice Christianity, or a combination of it and Native religion. During the past two decades, however, there has been a resurgence of Native interest in traditional religious practices. This has occurred throughout the country and includes groups which had been separated from their religious traditions for many years. "
Native Americans USA 1,000,000 - 300
units
- 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 188. "The United States has approximately a million Native Americans living on or near some 300 'Indian' reservations. "
Native Americans Utah 24,283 1.40% - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 18-19. Table: "Indian population in each of the 50 states... "; From 1990 U.S. Census: figures include "Indian & Alaska Native Population [both Aleut and Eskimo].
Native Americans Utah: Salt Lake County 8,337 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 22. Table: Metropolitan statistical areas with highest Indian populations. Data from 1990 U.S. Census.; "Salt Lake City-Ogden, UT "; Includes Alaska natives.
Native Americans Vermont 1,696 0.30% - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 18-19. Table: "Indian population in each of the 50 states... "; From 1990 U.S. Census: figures include "Indian & Alaska Native Population [both Aleut and Eskimo].
Native Americans Virginia 15,282 0.20% - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 18-19. Table: "Indian population in each of the 50 states... "; From 1990 U.S. Census: figures include "Indian & Alaska Native Population [both Aleut and Eskimo].
Native Americans Washington 81,483 1.70% - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 18-19. Table: "Indian population in each of the 50 states... "; From 1990 U.S. Census: figures include "Indian & Alaska Native Population [both Aleut and Eskimo].
Native Americans Washington, D.C. 1,466 0.20% - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 18-19. Table: "Indian population in each of the 50 states... "; From 1990 U.S. Census: figures include "Indian & Alaska Native Population [both Aleut and Eskimo].
Native Americans Washington, D.C. 11,036 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 22. Table: Metropolitan statistical areas with highest Indian populations. Data from 1990 U.S. Census.; "Washington, D.C.-into VA & MD "; Includes Alaska natives.
Native Americans Washington: Seattle 32,071 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 22. Table: Metropolitan statistical areas with highest Indian populations. Data from 1990 U.S. Census.; "Seattle-Tacoma, WA "; Includes Alaska natives.
Native Americans West Virginia 2,458 0.10% - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 18-19. Table: "Indian population in each of the 50 states... "; From 1990 U.S. Census: figures include "Indian & Alaska Native Population [both Aleut and Eskimo].
Native Americans Wisconsin 39,387 0.80% - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 18-19. Table: "Indian population in each of the 50 states... "; From 1990 U.S. Census: figures include "Indian & Alaska Native Population [both Aleut and Eskimo].
Native Americans world 2,975,569 - - 2
countries
1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 312, 315. "Native North Americans: Alternate Names: Indians: Location: United States; Canada; Population: 1,959,234 (US); 1,016,335 (Canada) "; Pg. 315: "According the 1990 Census, the total population of Native North Americans in the US was 1,959,234. The Canadian Census of 1991 counted a total of 1,016,335 Native North Americans, including about 500,000 North American Indians; 480,000 Metis and nonstatus Indians; and approximatley 35,000 Inuit. [NOTE: This is an ethnic statistic, NOT a measure of how many people practice traditional Native American religion.]
Native Americans world 1,500,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Lakota Nation " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The total number of native North Americans is approximately 1.5 million... "
Native Americans Wyoming 9,479 2.10% - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 18-19. Table: "Indian population in each of the 50 states... "; From 1990 U.S. Census: figures include "Indian & Alaska Native Population [both Aleut and Eskimo].
Native Americans - at least partial USA 20,000,000 - - - 1993 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 11. "Today in the U.S. there may be 10 to 20 million people with some Indian blood, but only a small percentage identify themselves as being primarily Indian (Taylor 1984). Also, no single definition of 'an Indian' exists--socially, administratively, legislatively, or judicially. "
Native Americans - Eastern tribes USA 3,928 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Native Americans - on reservations USA 437,431 0.18% - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 20. "The most recent census [1990] reported that 436,431 Indians--or 22.3% of the total--live on legally designated reservations or associated trust lands. Another 10.2% (200,789) live within 'Tribal Jurisdiction Statistical Areas,' which are former reservation areas in the state of Oklahoma where tribes retain certain types of tribal jurisdiction. "
Nature and Earth Based Religions Australia 1,734 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [This figure combines 1,617 from "Nature Religions not elsewhere classified " and "Nature Religions not further defined ". There was no category simply "Nature Religions ".]
Nature and Earth Based Religions New Zealand 669 0.02% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1996 NZ population: 3,616,633. Listed in table as "Nature and Earth Based Religions not further defined "
Nauru Congregational Church Nauru - - 7
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Nauru/Nauru Congregational Church (NCC) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Nauru Congregational Church (NCC)... Country information: Population: 9,400... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 7 district churches. "
Nauru Congregational Church world - - 7
units
1
country
1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Nauru/Nauru Congregational Church (NCC) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Nauru Congregational Church (NCC)... Country information: Population: 9,400... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 7 district churches. "
Nauset North America - Eastern Woodlands 1,200 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Nauset world 1,200 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Navajo California: Los Angeles County 2,500 - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 129. "...about 2,500 Navaho reside in greater Los Angeles at the present time. "
Navajo North America 8,000 - - - 1680 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 57. "Navajo... Estimated at 8,000 in 1680... "
Navajo North America 160,000 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 57. "Navajo... Estimated at 8,000 in 1680, there are more than 160,000 today, the largest Native American population on the continent. "
Navajo North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 8,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Navajo USA - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1949. "America's largest Indian tribe today, the Navaho live on a sizeable reservation that sprawls across the Arizona-New Mexico border "
Navajo USA 219,198 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Navajo USA 219,198 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Navajo USA 200,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 325, 327. "Navajos: Location: United States (Arizona; New Mexico; Colorado, Utah); Population: 200,000; Religion: Native American Church, Christianity "; Pg. 327: "Peyotism took hold among the Navajos around the 1930s... In 1955 its use was approved by the Tribal Council. About 25,000 Navajos now belong to the Native American Church (incorporated as the peyot religion), and as many as 12,000 more probably attend services without being registered on the rolls. Many Navajos are also at least nominally Christian, though even Christian Navajos usually continue to practice their native religion. "
Navajo world 8,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Navajo world 4,000 - - - 1865 Deloria Jr., Vine. God Is Red; New York: Grosset & Dunlap (1973); pg. 255. "In the 1860s the Navajo bands who were gathered up and marched to New Mexico to be imprisoned by Kit Carson numbered some 4,000 people. The basis of their unity as a people was similarity of language and occupation of a commonly defined area. "
Navajo world 9,500 - - - 1865 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 130. "In 1865, the Navaho tribe numbered 9,500... "
Navajo world 8,000 - - - 1868 Brown, Joseph Epes. "North American Indian Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 405. "Their [Navajo] number was approx. 8,000 in 1868. It rose to 50,000 in 1950 & 85,000 in 1961, & is at least 175,000 at present... Christian missions, [etc.]... have been incorporated around a central framework that remains to this day distinctly Navajo. "
Navajo world 45,000 - - - 1935 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 130. "In 1865, the Navaho tribe numbered 9,500; in 1935 it had grown to 45,000. "
Navajo world 50,000 - - - 1950 Brown, Joseph Epes. "North American Indian Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 405. "Their [Navajo] number was approx. 8,000 in 1868. It rose to 50,000 in 1950 & 85,000 in 1961, & is at least 175,000 at present... Christian missions, [etc.]... have been incorporated around a central framework that remains to this day distinctly Navajo. "
Navajo world 90,000 - - - 1960 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 130. "At the last census, taken in 1960, the Navaho population was 90,000. "
Navajo world 85,000 - - - 1961 Brown, Joseph Epes. "North American Indian Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 405. "Their [Navajo] number was approx. 8,000 in 1868. It rose to 50,000 in 1950 & 85,000 in 1961, & is at least 175,000 at present... Christian missions, [etc.]... have been incorporated around a central framework that remains to this day distinctly Navajo. "
Navajo world 150,000 - - - 1973 Deloria Jr., Vine. God Is Red; New York: Grosset & Dunlap (1973); pg. 255. "Today that same tribe numbers close to 150,000 people. The Navajo have not had sufficient time to develop an expanded religious or political structure to account for this tremendous population explosion. " [tribal # not may not equal rel. affiliation]
Navajo world 175,000 - - - 1984 Brown, Joseph Epes. "North American Indian Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 405. "Their [Navajo] number was approx. 8,000 in 1868. It rose to 50,000 in 1950 & 85,000 in 1961, & is at least 175,000 at present... Christian missions, [etc.]... have been incorporated around a central framework that remains to this day distinctly Navajo. "
Navajo world 100,000 - - - 1993 Carmody, Denise Lardner & John Tully Carmody, Native American Religion: An Introduction, Paulist Press: New York, NY (1993); pg. 259. "perhaps 100,000 "; NOTE: adherent figure is really an estimate of tribe pop., regardless of which religion individuals practice. In earlier periods, all tribe practiced tribal religion, but not necessarily true today.
Navigators - staff USA 2,200 - - - 1973 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 192. "Navigators boasted a staff of 2,200 in the United States, with another 400 serving abroad. "
Navigators - staff world 2,600 - - - 1973 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 192. "Navigators boasted a staff of 2,200 in the United States, with another 400 serving abroad. "
Naxi China 300,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 556-557. "Naxi: Alternate Names: Muoshayi, Moxieman, Nari, Naheng, Malimasha, Yuanke, Bangxi, Muoxie, Moshu, and Wuman; Location: China; Population: 300,000; Language: Naxi and Chinese; Religion: Dongba, Lamaism, Taoism, and Christianity "; "Most Naxi believe in a religion called 'Dongba'; others believe in Lamaism (the Tibetan version of Mahayana Buddhism) or Taoism. Since the 19th century a small number of them have converted to Christianity. " [NOTE: The 300,000 statistic is for Naxi as an ethnic/cultural group, not how many practice traditional Naxi religion, i.e. Dongba]
Nazarenes Asia - - - - 400 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 768. "Remnants of Jewish Christianity survived in various places in Palestine, Syria and Egypt until the 5th century. Its members clung to the original tenets of their faith, being characterized by their observance of the Mosaic Law, their belief that Jesus was of human origin, and their hostility to Paul. They are known only through the garbled and prejudiced accounts of orthodox Christian writers, who regarded them as heretics. They are named either as Ebionites or Nazarenes, and various strange beliefs and customs are ascribed to them; it is likely that some groups did adopt Gnostic ideas or held beliefs that stemmed from the Qumran Covenanters. "
Nazarenes Israel - - - - 100 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 386-387. "Ebionites ('Poor Ones'): Jews who believed that Jesus was the Messiah but kept many of their Jewish practices and split with Paul over his dismissal of Mosaic law or Torah. They believed that Jesus was human but not divine, accepted only the Gospel of Matthew, and disappeared after the 5th century. A similar group called the Nazarenes considered themselves Jews and believed in Jesus as Messiah, but they differed from the Ebionites in accepting Christ's divinity and supernatural birth. "
Nazarenes Syria - - - - 250 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1721. "Christianity in Edessa, however, was not exclusively encratitic. Before the sect of Encratites, Jewish Christianity had come to the city, possibly from Jerusalem (see Ebionites). These Jewish Christians called themselves Nazorees or Nazarenes, as the Syrian Christians did later on. The Manichean Kephalaia preserves a debate on Mani with a Nazoree about the problem of whether God... "
Nazareth Baptist Church South Africa - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1828. Caption: "Ceremonies in which traditional dancing plays an important part link the Nazareth Baptist Church with the tribal past. The founder of the movement was in his lifetime deified by his Zulu followers and his son, John Galilee Shembe, has inherited his claim to messiahship. "
Nazareth Baptist Church South Africa - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1832. "...movement... of John Galilee Shembe, whose organization is known as the Nazareth Baptist Church... In many respects the... Church resuscitates the richness of Zulu tribal and ceremonial life... A tract of land is maintained at which principal festivities are enacted and this serves, at leat symbolically, as a type of tribal homeland for the Shembe-ites. "
Nazism Alabama - - 1
unit
- 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Neo-Nazi groups.
Nazism Alabama - - 4
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Nazism Arizona - - 4
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Nazism Arkansas - - 4
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Nazism California - - 5
units
- 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Neo-Nazi groups.
Nazism California - - 11
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Nazism Colorado - - 2
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "


Nazism, continued

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