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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

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Myanmar Baptist Convention, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Myochikai Kyodan Japan 686,205 0.60% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Buddhist new religion (year of origin: 1950).
Myochikai Kyodan Japan - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 537. "Offshoots of Nichiren Buddhism total nineteen, including the popular 'new religions' such as Reiyukai, Rissho Koseikai, and Myochikai Kyodan. "
mystery religions Roman Empire - - - - -100 B.C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "MYSTERY RELIGIONS: a GROUP of RELIGIONS which flourished in the Greaco-Roman world which involved the secret initiation of the believer. Often BAPTISM, sometimes in the blood of cattle, was involved as well as BELIEFS about IMMORTALITY and the survival of the SOUL. The most famous mystery religions are the ELEUSINIAN MYSTERIES, ORPHISM, MITHRAISM and various FORMS of GNOSTICISM. "
mystery religions Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 34. "Much more powerful as a rival to Christianity were the mystery religions that were quite numerous & rapidly spreading during this period. They were syncretistic kinds of faiths that fused Hellenic & Oriental thought. The most important ones were the Dionysian & Orphic mysteries of Thrace; the Eleusinian from Eleusis, near Athens; the religion of the Great Mother, Cybele, from Anatolia in Asia Minor; the Persian religion of Mithra and the Egyptian cult of Isis & Osiris. They were called mysteries because their central rites were kept secret from all but initiates. In spite of various differences, they all had certain characteristics in common: a sublime view of the godhead, a profound sense of cleavage between spirit & flesh, & a great yearning for a redeemer who would deliver devotes from all guilt & confess on them eternal life. "
mystery religions Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1928. "During the Hellenistic period (3rd-1st centuries BC) very little is heard about Mysteries. But at the time of the Roman Empire such religions suddenly sprang up. The best-known are the Mysteries of Isis and Mithras. However, there were also groups which worshipped Attis and the Great Mother (see Cybele), Men, the moon god of Asia Minor, the Syrian gods Adonis, Jupiter Dolichenus and Helios of Emesa. The fire cult of the theurgists had a Mystery character and Judaism and Christianity were partly assimilated to the new type of religion. "
mystery religions Roman Empire - - - - 75 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1925. "Striking similarities have been noted between Christianity and the Mystery religions, cults which catered essentially for the needs of the individual and which developed in the same period, under Roman Imperial rule. "
mystery religions Roman Empire - - - - 100 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 307. "The Greeks called [Mithraism] and other such cults--like those of Eleusis, Dionysus, and Isis--mysteria, from a root meaning literally 'to keep one's mouth shut,' and from which the English words mystery and mysticism are derived. The term mystery applies to a sect capable of conferring initiation on its members. "
mystery religions world - - - - -500 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1925. "All races and nations in the primitive and early periods of their culture had initiation ceremonies which possessed a certain similarity with the Mysteries of the ancient world, and which could be called 'Mysteries'. In this article, however, the term 'Mysteries' will refer purely to the type of religion developed in the culture of the Greeks and the Romans, a religion which postulated that a man was free to make his own decisions and that he was permitted to join a particular religious group in preference to another. These Mysteries, therefore, presuppose an already differentiated society, in which there was no longer a primitive initiation ceremony which all members of the group had to go through. This new type of religion becomes evident in the time of Imperial Rome, although it had its beginnings as far back as the 6th or 5th century BC. "
mysticism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 164. "Mysticism: The difficulties encountered in attempting to define mysticism are well known. Dan Inge, in his Mysticism in Religion, quotes no fewer than twenty-six different definitions of mysticism to which he adds others. All of these refer to religious experience, more specifically to communion with God, of an intense and direct nature. Jewish mysticism can be defined, therefore, as that aspect of Jewish religious experiences in which the mind encounters God directly. The Kabbalah is often identified with Jewish mysticism but, while undoubtedly the Kabbalistic doctrines were formulated by men who reflected profoundly on the divine and who were in this sense mystics, there were Jewish mystics before the rise of the Kabbalah and the Kabbalah itself is not limited to purely mystical speculations. " [More.]
Naga Asia - South 3,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Nagaland is situated where the borders of India, China and Burma meet. The Naga People, who immigrated to Nagaland from Mongolia in the 10th century, consist of three million people. They belong to a different culture and race than the rest of the population in the area. When India became independent in 1947 the Nagas proclaimed their own independence but was, despite this, incorporated into India. Nagaland is still a part if India, much because of a massive presence of Indian military in Nagaland. "
Naga India 500,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1939. "The mountainous border country between India and Burma is inhabited by a group of tribes known as the Nagas. They are of Mongoloid race and speak a variety of Tibeto-Burman languages. The total number of Nagas within the frontiers of India is about half a million, and although divided into a number of tribes, with different languages and customs, they are clearly distinguished from all surrounding populations. "; Pg. 1940: "In recent decades large numbers of Nagas have been converted to Christianity, and the practice of the old tribal religion is on the wane. "
Naga world 3,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Nagaland " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Nagaland is situated at the junction of China, India and Burma, occupying an area of 120,000 km2 of the Patakai range... The population of more than 3 million people is comprised of 16 major and 20 minor tribes. The Naga people originally came from Mongolia, migrating to Nagaland in the 10th century BC. Organisations: Nagaland is represented in UNPO by the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN). "
Nagaland Baptist Church Council India 307,949 - 1,253
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Nama Namibia - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Nambikuara Brazil 10,000 - - - 1900 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. viii. "In Brazil... Of the 10,000 Nambikuara in 1900, only 1,000 could be traced in 1940. "
Nambikuara Brazil 1,000 - - 1
country
1940 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. viii. "In Brazil... Of the 10,000 Nambikuara in 1900, only 1,000 could be traced in 1940. "
Nanais Russia 12,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 262, 264. "Nanais: Location: Russia (extreme southeastern Siberia); Population: About 12,000 "; "The traditional Nanai religion is a form of shamanism... After the Nanais' homeland passed under Russian control, missionaries from the Russian Orthodox Church attempted to convert them to Christianity. Although many were formally baptized, they continued to practice their ancient religion. Nanai shamans, like those of other Siberian native peoples, suffered imprisonment and execution during Stalin's anti-religious campaigns, and as a result shamanism was driven underground. Since Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbechev ended the Soviet government's persecution of religion during the 1980s, the Nanais have begun to practice shamanism more openly. "
Nanticoke North America - Eastern Woodlands 2,700 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Nanticoke world 2,700 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Nanzwa Zimbabwe - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Naqshbandiya Chechnia - - - - 1800 Gall, Carlotta & Thomas de Waal. Chechnya: Calamity in the Caucasus; New York University Press (1998); pg. 32. "The Naqshbandiya [a Sufi order] from Bukhara in Central Asia, which dominated Chechnya and Dagestan at the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century, was preached by a series of imams... "
Naqshbandiya Iran - - - - 1150 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 723. "Another major pan-Islamic order, the Naqshbandiyya, traced their lineage back to Junayd's spiritual opposite, the northwest Iranian shaikh Abu Yazid Bistami... "
Naqshbandiya world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 448. "The only Sufi order that doesn't trace its lineage to the son-in-law of the Prophet, Ali, is the Naqshbandi, named for Shaykh Muhammad Baha ud-Din Naqshband of Bukhara (d. 1389), but actually based on the insights of two 12th-century shaykhs, including a silent dhikr. The Naqshbandis base themselves on the first caliph, Abu Bakr. They are noted for their use of breathing exercises that use the divine names and increase the flow of oxygen into the bloodstream, inducing ecstatic states through their concentration on divine energy (reminiscent of certain Taoist and yogic techniques). "
Naqshbandiya world - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Naqshbandi.net "; web page: "A 30-Second Guide to Sufi Orders Found in North America " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999). [Orig. source: GNOSIS Magazine #30 (Winter 1994)] "Naqshbandi (founder: Muhammad Baha' ad-Din Naqshband [1317-1389]). Particularly strong in the Caucasus and Central Asia, the Naqshibandi order is considered a 'sober' Sufi order "
Nara Buddhism Japan - - - - 710 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 523. "Nara Buddhism (A.D. 710-784). Introduced to Japan in A.D. 538 and first supported by the Soga clan, Buddhism rose over the objections of the pro-Shinto Mononobe. When in 710 Emperor Shomu established a new capital at Nara modeled after the capital of China, Buddhism received official support and began to flourish. Internal corruption and growing secularism emerged in the second half of this period. The monk Dokyo exerted his influence on Empress Shotoku and plotted to ascend the throne. Finally, to curb such clerical interference, Emperor Kammu moved the capital to Heian (Kyoto) in 784. "; Pg. 524: "The six [Nara Buddhist] schools were overseen by the state. Though displaced by Heian Buddhism, some schools continued through the centuries. "
Nara Buddhism Japan - - - - 784 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 524. "The six Nara Buddhist schools. Six scholarly disciplines were pursuied by a small number of monks at designated home temples in Nara. They were extensions of Chinese scholarship... Kusha... Jojitsu... Sanron... Hosso... Kegon... Ritsu... "
Nara Buddhism Japan 4,190,308 3.36% - - 1993 O'Brien, J. & M. Palmer. The State of Religion Atlas. Simon & Schuster: New York (1993); pg. 26-27. "Shares of Buddhist sect membership in Japan, 1981: Tendai: 30%; Nichiren: 30%; Pure Land: 18%; Shingon: 10%; Zen: 8%; Nara: 4%. " Percentages and numbers made using est. of 84% of Japan being Buddhist, total pop. of country: 124,711,551 (1993).
Narragansett Rhode Island - - 1
unit
- 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 19. "They lived in Rhode Island and Connecticut... Twenty-five Narragansett were counted in 1900. Descendants live in Rhode Island on an 1,800-acre, federally recognized reservation. "
Narragansett USA 25 - - - 1900 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 19. "They lived in Rhode Island and Connecticut... Twenty-five Narragansett were counted in 1900. Descendants live in Rhode Island on an 1,800-acre, federally recognized reservation. "
Narragansett and Eastern Niantic North America - Eastern Woodlands 4,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Narragansett and Niantic, Eastern (1600): 4,000 "
Narragansett and Eastern Niantic world 4,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Narragansett and Niantic, Eastern (1600): 4,000 "
Naskapi Quebec 300 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 89. "Naskapi... They inhabited the northcentral area of the Labrador peninsula... There are a few hundred Naskapi who live today in Quebec. "
Nastika India - - - - -500 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 525. "Nastika (Hindu - Sanskrit; lit. 'one who says, there is not'). A number of nihilstic schools of thought in ancient India. The nastikas opposed most of the doctrines of orthodox Hinduism, and were thus atheistic and existentialist in outlook. More generally, this term refers to all religious groups who deny the authority of the Vedas and, therefore, are deemed unorthodox; that is, 'non-Hindu.' "
Natchez North America 4,500 - - - 1650 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 9. Estimates of total population from another source.
Natchez North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 4,500 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Natchez world 4,500 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Natchitoches Confederacy North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 1,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Year not given. 1650 is most common year for other groups in this table.
Natchitoches Confederacy world 1,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Year not given. 1650 is most common year for other groups in this table.
Nation of Islam Michigan: Detroit - - - - 1930 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 109. "The Nation of Islam, the Black Muslims, began in Detroit during the Depression. Its founder, W. D. Fard, gathered followers from among the poverty-stricken blacks of Detroit and organized the Detroit Temple... As the movement developed, Fard established a hierarchy under a minister of Islam, Elijah Muhammad. Upon Fard's disappearance in June 1934, Elijah Muhammad... moved to Chicago and took charge of Temple No. 2... "
Nation of Islam USA 10,000 - - - 1961 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 73-74. "Malcom [X]... became a minister, and his passionate, angry, intensely personal preaching in the 1950s and early 1960s attracted many converts. The Nation of Islam grew from a small group of only a few hundred followers of Elijah Muhammad to a national movement with ten thousand or more members... In 1964, however, Malcom separated from the Nation of Islam... "
Nation of Islam USA 100,000 - 50
units
- 1964 Lincoln, C. Eric. The Black Muslims in America (Third Edition, with a new "Postscript "; 1st printing 1961). Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (1994); pg. 218. "The [Black] Muslims originated as a small, local group, but in their period of greatest growth--the middle 1950s to 1964--their membership may have reached between 50,000 and 100,000. No one outside the movement can be certain, and only the inner circle of the Chicago headquarters of the Nation would have the inside information on membership. There are still more than fifty mosques stretching across the country, and many of these have satellite units identified only as 'A,' 'B,' 'C,' etc. "
Nation of Islam USA 50,000 - - - 1975 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 78. "In 1975, Elijah Muhammad died... By then, the Nation [of Islam] claimed more than 50,000 members... "
Nation of Islam USA - - - - 1978 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 437. "A new Nation of Islam was formed under Louis Farrakhan in 1978 as Warith Deen Mohammed was beginning his move to orthodox Islam. "
Nation of Islam USA 20,000 - - - 1990 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 390. "Another 20,000 Black Muslims are led by Minister Louis Farrakhan, who continues the black nationalist teachings and retains the name Nation of Islam (Lincoln & Mamiya, 1990:389-90). "
Nation of Islam USA 20,000 - - - 1991 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 82. "In the 1980s and early 1990s, the number of Muslims in America rose sharply, to 3 or 4 million... one third were American-born converts, most of them black. Perhaps 20,000 of these black American Muslims belonged to the Nation of Islam. "
Nation of Islam USA 100,000 - - - 1991 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: New York Times, March 3, 1994.]; pg. 83. "It is difficult to measure the Nation's influence among black Americans. Estimates of Nation of Islam membership in the early 1990s ranged from fewer than 10,000 to as many as 100,000. However, the Nation's actual membership statistics undoubtedly understate its influence. "
Nation of Islam USA 100,000 - - - 1994 Lincoln, C. Eric. The Black Muslims in America (Third Edition, with a new "Postscript "; 1st printing 1961). Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (1994); pg. 269. "While accurate statistics of the Nation's current membership are not available, an estimate of between 70,000 and 100,000 seems consistent with what is known about other aspects of the community. "
Nation of Islam USA 20,000 - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 438. "Šnew Nation of Islam?Farrakhan has only about 20,000 followers today. "
Nation of Islam USA 10,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site; (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Louis Farakhan of the 10,000-member Nation of Islam
Nation of Islam USA 100,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) Islam:Nation of Islam:
There is no exact number for the membership but it is roughly estimated to be no less than 10,000 and no more than 100,000 followers.
Nation of Islam USA - blacks - - - - 1998 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 397. "Despite the high visibility of certain Muslim groups, less than 2 percent of the black population in America is Muslim, and an even smaller subset belong to the Nation of Islam... "
Nation of Islam world 100,000 - - - 1960 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 1068. "... statistics are not released, but responsible estimates made around 1960 spoke of a hundred thousand disciplined... and predominantly male followers of whom was expected unquestioning obedience, regular attendance at meetings... "
Nation of Islam world 1,000,000 - - - 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). "Today membership claims vary between 750,000 and one million. "
Nation of Islam world 10,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site; (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Louis Farakhan of the 10,000-member Nation of Islam
Nation of Islam world 100,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) Islam:Nation of Islam:
There is no exact number for the membership but it is roughly estimated to be no less than 10,000 and no more than 100,000 followers.
Nation of Yahweh world - - - 17
countries
1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) Christianity:
The homepage claims to encompass over 1300 U.S. cities and 16 foreign countries.
National Alliance West Virginia - - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 86. "The National Alliance. Based on a 346-acre compound in Mill Point, West Virginia, the National Alliance is also strongly anti-Semitic, although it doesn't have ties with Germany or German Nazis. Leader William L. Pierce is the author of The Turner Diaries, which he calls the 'Handbook for White Victory.' It's the adventurous fantasy that inspired members of The Order to rob banks and print counterfeit money to raise cash to finance a revolution against the U.S. government. Recently, Pierce decided to follow the route of the religious right, and he established the 'Cosmotheist Community Church,' which also gave him tax-exempt status. "
National Association of Christian Educators/Citizens for Excellence in Education USA - - 1,250
units
- 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); [Compiled by P-Flag]; pg. 477. List of "Family Values " organizations. "National Association of Christian Educators/Citizens for Excellence in Education - Goal is to bring public education under Christian control. Priority is disruption of public schools via attacks on curricula, text books, and school boards. 1,250 chapters. (Head: Dr. Robert L. Simonds) "
National Association of Evangelicals USA 1,000,000 - - - 1945 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 192. "Having begun with about 1 million members in the 1940s, the NAE now boasted more than 3.5 million members. "
National Association of Evangelicals USA 1,000,000 - - - 1946 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 174. "...National Association of Evangelicals (NAE)... The NAE represented only a million members by the end of World War II, a tiny fraction of American Protestantism. "
National Association of Evangelicals USA 1,500,000 - - - 1956 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 958. "By 1956 [the National Association of Evangelicals] claimed over a million and a half members, and spoke ambiguously of 'service connetions' with ten million more.' " [2 largest member churches: Assemblies of God, Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee)]
National Association of Evangelicals USA 3,500,000 - - - 1973 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 192. "Having begun with about 1 million members in the 1940s, the NAE now boasted more than 3.5 million members. "
National Association of Evangelicals USA 4,300,000 - 42,000
units
- 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 295. "The National Association of Evangelicals, the conservative alternative to the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A., consists of over fifty denominations, 42,000 local congregations, 4.3 million communicants "
National Association of Evangelicals USA 5,000,000 - - - 1992 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992); pg. 162. "The National Association of Evangelicals, with forty-eight member denominations, loosely represents a constituency of about 5 million members and has a theological and political diversity that makes it difficult to reach a consensus on many issues. "
National Association of Evangelicals USA - - 45,000
units
- 2000 *LINK* Associated Press. "Religion Briefs: Church federation decides to allow dual membership " in Deseret News, 18 Mar 2000. ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) Rewriting a rule that dates from its founding in 1943, the National Association of Evangelicals has decided to admit denominations that affirm its conservative creed even if they also hold membership in the National Council of Churches.

The constitutional change by an NAE board meeting resulted from a 1999 inquiry about such dual membership from the 260,000-member Reformed Church in America, a charter member of the NCC... The NAE, with offices in Glendora, Calif., includes 51 Protestant denominations and 45,000 local congregations. It also represents 250 interdenominational organizations such as National Religious Broadcasters and World Relief.

NAE President Kevin Mannoia, who took office last year just as the Reformed Church sent its request, said the change means evangelicals no longer define themselves in relation to other interchurch organizations. He called it "a statement of maturity and strength of identity. "



National Association of Evangelicals, continued

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