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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

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Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Morrisites Nebraska: Omaha 10 - - - 1870 *LINK* Matteson, Edith and Jean Matteson. "Mormon Influence on Scandinavian Settlement in Nebraska " Originally published in On Distant Shores: Proceedings of the Marcus Lee Hansen Immigrration Conference; Aalborg, Denmark June 29 - July 1, 1992. Edited by Birgit Flemming Larsen, Henning Bender and Karen Veien. Published by the Danes Worldwide Archives in colloboration with the Danish Society for Emigration History in Aalborg, Denmark; 1993. (Viewed 30 Jan. 1999) "Morrisites... [Jesus Christ's Church of God's Most High]... Ten of these people were identified in the U.S. census records for Omaha for the years 1870, 1880, and 1900. "
Morrisites Nebraska: Omaha 10 - - - 1880 *LINK* Matteson, Edith and Jean Matteson. "Mormon Influence on Scandinavian Settlement in Nebraska " Originally published in On Distant Shores: Proceedings of the Marcus Lee Hansen Immigrration Conference; Aalborg, Denmark June 29 - July 1, 1992. Edited by Birgit Flemming Larsen, Henning Bender and Karen Veien. Published by the Danes Worldwide Archives in colloboration with the Danish Society for Emigration History in Aalborg, Denmark; 1993. (Viewed 30 Jan. 1999) "Morrisites... [Jesus Christ's Church of God's Most High]... Ten of these people were identified in the U.S. census records for Omaha for the years 1870, 1880, and 1900. "
Morrisites Nebraska: Omaha 10 - - - 1900 *LINK* Matteson, Edith and Jean Matteson. "Mormon Influence on Scandinavian Settlement in Nebraska " Originally published in On Distant Shores: Proceedings of the Marcus Lee Hansen Immigrration Conference; Aalborg, Denmark June 29 - July 1, 1992. Edited by Birgit Flemming Larsen, Henning Bender and Karen Veien. Published by the Danes Worldwide Archives in colloboration with the Danish Society for Emigration History in Aalborg, Denmark; 1993. (Viewed 30 Jan. 1999) "Morrisites... [Jesus Christ's Church of God's Most High]... Ten of these people were identified in the U.S. census records for Omaha for the years 1870, 1880, and 1900. "
Morrisites USA 500 - - - 1861 *LINK* Matteson, Edith and Jean Matteson. "Mormon Influence on Scandinavian Settlement in Nebraska " Originally published in On Distant Shores: Proceedings of the Marcus Lee Hansen Immigrration Conference; Aalborg, Denmark June 29 - July 1, 1992. Edited by Birgit Flemming Larsen, Henning Bender and Karen Veien. Published by the Danes Worldwide Archives in colloboration with the Danish Society for Emigration History in Aalborg, Denmark; 1993. (Viewed 30 Jan. 1999) "One group that returned to Nebraska was a branch of the 'Morrisites' called the 'Jesu Christi Kjerke af Den allerhiiestes Guds Hellige' [Jesus Christ's Church of God's Most High]... By late 1861 Morris's followers numbered about 500 with as many sympathizers. "
Morrisites USA - - - - 1870 *LINK* Matteson, Edith and Jean Matteson. "Mormon Influence on Scandinavian Settlement in Nebraska " Originally published in On Distant Shores: Proceedings of the Marcus Lee Hansen Immigrration Conference; Aalborg, Denmark June 29 - July 1, 1992. Edited by Birgit Flemming Larsen, Henning Bender and Karen Veien. Published by the Danes Worldwide Archives in colloboration with the Danish Society for Emigration History in Aalborg, Denmark; 1993. (Viewed 30 Jan. 1999) "Morrisites... [Jesus Christ's Church of God's Most High]... After Morris was killed following a dispute in 1862, his followers began leaving Utah. The Morrisites, many of whom were Scandinavians, eventually settled in California, Idaho, Iowa, Montana, Nebraska, and Nevada. The exodus began in 1863... "
Morrisites Utah 19 - - - 1860 *LINK* Matteson, Edith and Jean Matteson. "Mormon Influence on Scandinavian Settlement in Nebraska " Originally published in On Distant Shores: Proceedings of the Marcus Lee Hansen Immigrration Conference; Aalborg, Denmark June 29 - July 1, 1992. Edited by Birgit Flemming Larsen, Henning Bender and Karen Veien. Published by the Danes Worldwide Archives in colloboration with the Danish Society for Emigration History in Aalborg, Denmark; 1993. (Viewed 30 Jan. 1999) "Morrisites... [Jesus Christ's Church of God's Most High]... At least thirteen members of the group had been in Utah because they were baptized in South Weber. An additional six people who were members of the Omaha or Council Bluffs congregations were found in the 1860 Utah census. "
Morrisites world 0 - - - 1970 *LINK* Matteson, Edith and Jean Matteson. "Mormon Influence on Scandinavian Settlement in Nebraska " Originally published in On Distant Shores: Proceedings of the Marcus Lee Hansen Immigrration Conference; Aalborg, Denmark June 29 - July 1, 1992. Edited by Birgit Flemming Larsen, Henning Bender and Karen Veien. Published by the Danes Worldwide Archives in colloboration with the Danish Society for Emigration History in Aalborg, Denmark; 1993. (Viewed 30 Jan. 1999) "Morrisites... [Jesus Christ's Church of God's Most High]... The Church of Jesus Christ of Saints of the Most High officially disbanded in 1969. "
Morse Fellowship world 250 - - - 1975 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 71. "The Morse Fellowship was an early channeling group build around the material channeled by Louise Morse... Morse gave weekly trance sessions during the 1970s, transcripts of which were maled to pprximately 250 people. "
Moshi Ghana - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Mosopelea North America - Eastern Woodlands 200 - - - 1700 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Mosopelea (1700) (?): 200 "
Mosopelea world 200 - - - 1700 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Mosopelea (1700) (?): 200 "
Mossi Africa 7,200,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 306. "Mossi: Location: Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire; Population: 5 to 6 million in Burkina Faso, 1.2 million in Cote d'Ivoire; Religion: traditional religion (3 main components: creator, fertility spirits, ancestors) "
Mossi Burkina Faso - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Mossi Burkina Faso 6,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 306. "Mossi: Location: Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire; Population: 5 to 6 million in Burkina Faso, 1.2 million in Cote d'Ivoire; Religion: traditional religion (3 main components: creator, fertility spirits, ancestors) "
Mossi Cote d'Ivoire 1,200,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 306. "Mossi: Location: Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire; Population: 5 to 6 million in Burkina Faso, 1.2 million in Cote d'Ivoire; Religion: traditional religion (3 main components: creator, fertility spirits, ancestors) "
Mother Grove An Tich Geata Gairdeachas United Kingdom - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 722. "In 1717 John Toland gathered delegates from Bardic and Druid circles in some ten areas, including York, Oxford, Wales, Cornwall, Anglesey, the Isle of Man, parts of Scotland, Ireland and Brittany as well as London, to form the Universal Druid Bond from which the present outward body descends, the Mother Grove An Tich Geata Gairdeachas. The grove no longer professes any specific religion, but forms a deistic philosophy. "
Mother Hearth USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 75. "Mother Hearth, 222 Rad Nor Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15221... Eclectic women's spiritual path; combines elements of various traditions; celebrates the eight harvest holidays; meets for healing, divination work, and study; women-only; formerly Seedweavers Circle. "
Mount Calvary Holy Church of America USA - - - 1
country
1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Black Holiness; pg. 224. "Mount Calvary Holy Church of America... Durham, NC [H.Q.]... is a small black holiness church headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts, founded by Bishop Brumfield Johnson... Churches are located in North Carolina; Baltimore, Maryland; New York; Boston; and other cities on the east coast. Membership: Not reported. "
Mount Hebron Apostolic Temple of Our Lord Jesus of the Apostolic Faith world 3,000 - 9
units
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Apostolic Pentecostals; pg. 266. "Mount Hebron Apostolic Temple of Our Lord Jesus of the Apostolic Faith... Yonkers, NY [H.Q.]... was founded in 1963 by George H. Wiley III, paster of theYonkers, New York, congregation of the Apostolic Church of Christ in God... Membership: In 1980 the temple reported 3,000 members in nine congregations being served by 15 ministers. "
Mount Sinai Holy Church world 2,000 - 92
units
- 1968 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Black Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 276. "Mount Sinai Holy Church... Ida Robinson... founded... in 1924... Membership: Not reported. In 1968 there were 92 churches, and approximately 2,000 members. "
Mountain Jews Russia: Dagestan 19,000 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 294-295. Table with 2 columns: "Ethnic Group " & "Population "; "The few peoples of Dagestan who are not Muslim include the Mountain Jews, who follow Judaism rather than Islam, and the Cossacks, who are Christian... "; Pg. 295: "Aside from the Mountain Jews and the Christian Cossacks, the peoples of Dagestan are almost exclusively Muslim... In particular, the Mountain Jews have retained an ancient Jewish faith featuring a unique blending of Caucasian Mountaineer practices and Jewish religious traditions. "
Mourides Senegal 400,000 - - - 1982 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: WORLD CHRISTIAN ENCYCLOPEDIA, A comparative survey of churches and religions in the modern world; Edited by David B. Barrett; published by Oxford University Press, 1982.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Islam:
Muridiya with over 400,000 members whose headquarters is Touba. The Murid chiefs control about 50% of Senegal's peanut production through a feudal system.
Mourides Senegal 423,000 - - - 1982 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: WORLD CHRISTIAN ENCYCLOPEDIA, A comparative survey of churches and religions in the modern world; Edited by David B. Barrett; published by Oxford University Press, 1982.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Islam:
Muslims: African Sunnis (of the Malikite rite). Islamic brotherhoods active (1957): Qadiriya with 304,000 members, the missionary order of Tinjaniya with 1 million; Muridiya 423,000; 23,000 in others.
Mourides Senegal - 75.00% - - 1986 Mazrui, Ali A. The Africans: A Triple Heritage. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company (1986); pg. 152. "Mourides of Senegal, an Islamic brotherhood that grew out of the Qadiriyya movement of the Sufi branch of Islam... Some caim that up to three-quarters of the population of the country are now Mouride, though that estimate may be exaggerated. What is clear is that the Mouride movement has had a major impact on both the economy and the politics of Senegal. The capital... is Touba... "
Mourides Senegal 400,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: Senegal-Online; web page: "LES RELIGIONS AU SÉNÉGAL " (viewed Jan. 1999) Part of original French: " L'ecole autonome des mourides (signifiant en arabe les aspirants) fut fondee par le marabout Ahmadou Bamba et cette confrerie regroupait 400,000 talibes (fideles) a sa mort en 1927. "; Translation: "Islam... is the religion of more than 95% of the population... This Islamization continued starting from the end of XIXth century with the appearance of the large Moslem brotherhoods: mourides and tidjanes. The autonomous school of the mourides (meaning in Arabic the candidates) was rested by the marabout Ahmadou Bamba and this brotherhood gathered 400,000 talibes (faithful) with her death in 1999. "
Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness, Church of the USA 3,000 - - - 1993 *LINK* Religious Requirements & Practices of Certain Selected Groups: A Handbook for Chaplains (1993) - (online ed. - 1998); contract #: MDA903-90-C-0062 w/ Dept. of Defense; J. Gordon Melton, Project Director & James Lewis. "MEMBERSHIP: MSIA has no formal membership. About 4,500 people currently study with the Church of MSIA (which means that they subscribe to Soul Awareness Discourses). About 3,000 are in the U.S., and about 1,500 are in other countries, mainly Mexico and Latin America; England, France, and other parts of Europe; Australia; Canada; and Nigeria. Congregations in MSIA take the form of meetings, seminars, conferences, classes, retreats, etc., which are scheduled in various communities, and students are invited to participate in them. "
Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness, Church of the world 4,500 - - - 1993 *LINK* Religious Requirements & Practices of Certain Selected Groups: A Handbook for Chaplains (1993) - (online ed. - 1998); contract #: MDA903-90-C-0062 w/ Dept. of Defense; J. Gordon Melton, Project Director & James Lewis. "MEMBERSHIP: MSIA has no formal membership. About 4,500 people currently study with the Church of MSIA (which means that they subscribe to Soul Awareness Discourses). About 3,000 are in the U.S., and about 1,500 are in other countries, mainly Mexico and Latin America; England, France, and other parts of Europe; Australia; Canada; and Nigeria. Congregations in MSIA take the form of meetings, seminars, conferences, classes, retreats, etc., which are scheduled in various communities, and students are invited to participate in them. "
Mozabites Algeria - - - - 1992 Peddicord, Kathleen (ed). The World's Best: The Ultimate Book for the International Traveler. Baltimore, MD: Agora, Inc. (1992); pg. 366. "Algeria... The most fundamentalist town: In the very fundamentalist town of Ghardaia, the few women on the streets are clothed and veiled from head to foot. They have one eyehole, through which they peer cautiously. Ghardaia is the most prosperous town in the country and is inhabited, as it has been for more than 900 years, by the Mozabites, a strict Moslem sect that broke from the mainstream of Islam in the seventh century. The people use the same underground irrigation canals, live in the same cubelike houses, and worship in the same mysterious mosques as did their ancestors. "
Mpondo South Africa - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Mrabri Thailand - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 709. "While their numbers are small, the religions of such groups as... the elusive Mrabri of Yumbri (the 'spirits of the yellow leaves') of northern Thailand... reflect, at least in part, an adaptation to a hunting-and-gathering mode of existence. "
Mros Bangladesh - - - - 1989 Brown, Susan. Pakistan and Bangladesh (series: People and Places). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Silver Burdett Press (1989); pg. 25. "Followers of Buddha: In the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh live several groups of people who follow the Buddhist religion. They originally came from Burma and still look like people of that country. The four main groups are called Chakmas, Marmas, Tripuras, and Mros. Each group speaks a different language. "
Mt. Zion Sanctuary Jamaica - - 12
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 251. Church reporting.
Mt. Zion Sanctuary Nigeria - - 10
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 251. Church reporting.
Mt. Zion Sanctuary United Kingdom: England - - 2
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 251. Church reporting.
Mt. Zion Sanctuary USA 100 - 2
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 251. Church reporting.
Mt. Zion Sanctuary world - - 26
units
4
countries
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 251. Church reporting.
Mu'tazila Iraq - - - - 833 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 508. "Mu'tazila (Islam - Arabic; lit. 'standing aloof, withdrawal'). The celebrated 'rationalist' school of early Islamic theology (Kalam)... The advocates preferred to call themselves the 'People of [the Divine] Justice and Unity.' The origins of the movement are obscure, but by the mid-ninth century A.D. its characteristic principles had been worked into a coherent philosophical and political theology which combined Greek logical and metaphysical conceptions with the Qur'anic revelation, ideally granting them equal status while in practice favoring reason, at least implicitly... the Mu'tazilites were earnest, at times even puritanical, defenders of Islam from both its external and internal enemies. An inquisition was instituted in Baghdad when the school was for a time in a dominant position under its champion, the 'Abbasid Caliph al-Ma'mun (A.D. 813-33). "
Mu'tazila world - - - - 1144 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 508. "Ash'ari (d. 935) was influential in stemming the influence in Sunni Islam of [the Mu'tazila] school, although he had originally distinguished himself in it. The Shi'ites have continued to cultivate Mu'tazilite principles in theological reflection. Al-Zamakhshari (d. 1144) filled his celebrated Qur'an commentary with Mu'tazilite interpretations, which Sunni students are warned to resist while absorbing the uniquely valuable philological discussions. "
Mubarakiyya world - - - - 900 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 635. "The Qarmatians were probably an offshoot of a [Sab'iyya/Sevener] group called Mubarakiyya, who regareded Isma'il's son Muhammad as successor to his grandfather al-Sadiq... The Qarmatians differed from the Mubarakiyya in maintaining that prophecy ended with Muhammad, and that there would be seven imams after him, ending with Muhammad bin Isma'il... "
Mughtasila Babylonia - - - - 228 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1721. "Manicheism was... founded by a Babylonian prince of Persian origin named Mani, who was born in 216 AD. According to the Fihrist of the Arabic author An Nadim, when Mani was 12 years old God sent an angel called at-Taum (twin) to him, ordering him to leave the ascetic sect to which his father belonged... It has been established that Mani was familiar with the views of the Mandeans, a baptist sect still existing in Iraq, most probably originating from Palestine and possibly then living in southern Babylonia. It seems plausible that the sect of the Mughtasila (Baptists) to which Mani's father belonged, was a sort of Mandean or Proto-Mandean sect. The difficulty is that the Mughtasila are said to ahve been strongly encratitic, whereas the Mandeans are not, and never seem to have been. Moreover it is not certain that the Mandeans, now a gnostic sect, were already then gnostic to the same extent as they are now. "
Mukyokai Japan - - - - 1930 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 502. "Mukyokai (Christian - Jap.; lit. 'non-church'). A movement initiated by the Japanese independent evangelist Kanzo Uchimura (1861-1930). Suggested translations include 'nonecclesiastical church movement,' anti-clerical church' and 'churchless Christianity.'... From the day he signed the 'Covenant of Believers in Jesus' prepared by Clark (1877) he was dedicated to proclaiming the gospel independently of the existing church. He formed prayer and Bible study groups throughout Japan, all of which were disbanded in accordance with his will when he died. "
Multnomah North America - Pacific Coast 3,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Multnomah world 3,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Munda religion India: Bihar 225,590 26.54% - - 1981 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 544-545. "The 1981 census reported 850,000 Mundas in Bihar State, where most of the Munda population is found... "; Pg. 545: "Some Mundas have accepted Hinduism and Christianity, although they preserve many of their earlier religious practices. The 1981 census recorded 45.56% of Mundas as Hindus, 27.72% as Christian, and 26.54% as following the traditional religion. "
Mundas India 1,250,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 544-545. "Mundas: Location: India (Bihar state); Population: 1.25 million (estimate); Language: Mundari; Religion: Traditional animism; Hinduism; Christianity "; "The 1981 census reported 850,000 Mundas in Bihar State, where most of the Munda population is found. Allowing for natural increase, and the numbers of Mundas living in West Bengal, Assam, and in other northeastern states, the Munda population is estimated to be around 1.25 million today. " [NOTE: These statistics are of tribal/ethnic affiliation, NOT counts of how many practice traditional Munda religion.]
Mundas India: Bihar 850,000 - - - 1981 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 544-545. "Mundas: Location: India (Bihar state); Population: 1.25 million (estimate); Language: Mundari; Religion: Traditional animism; Hinduism; Christianity "; "The 1981 census reported 850,000 Mundas in Bihar State, where most of the Munda population is found. Allowing for natural increase, and the numbers of Mundas living in West Bengal, Assam, and in other northeastern states, the Munda population is estimated to be around 1.25 million today. " [NOTE: These statistics are of tribal/ethnic affiliation, NOT counts of how many practice traditional Munda religion.]
Mundurucu Brazil 20,000 - - - 1925 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. viii. "In Brazil... The Munduruku were 20,000 in 1925... "
Mundurucu Brazil 1,200 - - 1
country
1950 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. viii. "In Brazil... The Munduruku were 20,000 in 1925; in 1950 they numbered 1,200. "
Mundurucu Brazil - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "
Mundurucu Brazil - - 7
units
- 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 705. "In the early twentieth century the Mundurucu became involved in the Brazilian rubber economy, and many hundreds of them abandoned village life, settling on the Cururu and Tapajos rivers in individual family households, where they tapped latex for a living. A Catholic mission and a Brazilian Indian agency were established among them, and traditional life soon disapeared. There remain, however, seven villages away from the riverine area and in the rolling savannah, where an effort is made to maintain traditional life. Despite the many social changes among the Mundurucu, shamanism preserves its role in curing as well as in hunting, fishing, and agricultural endeavors. The long-term prognosis, however, is not good. "
Muong Vietnam 550,000 0.77% - - 1994 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Vietnam ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1994); pg. 37, 39. Pg. 37: "...Vietnam's 71.8 million people... "; Pg. 39: "In the mountains of northern Vietnam, the largest ethnic groups are the Tai (2,000,000), the Muong (550,0000), the Hmong Meo (200,000), and the Zao (200,000)... the Muong language is closely related to Vietnamese. "
Murtipujaka Svetambaras India - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: Jainworld; web page: "History of various sects " (viewed 16 Jan. 1999) "The Murtipujaka Svetambaras are found scattered all over India for business purposes in large urban centers, still they are concentrated mostly in Gujarat. "
Murung world 16,000 - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 63. "Few truly primitive, untouched peoples remain in the modern world, but a few such groups do exist in... Chittagong Hill Tracts... The more primitive groups are restricted to the less accessible Bandarban forest area; among these are the 16,000 Murung tribesmen. "
Musar Movement Lithuania - - - - 1870 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 162-163. "Musar Movement: The movement was founded by Israel Salanter in nineteenth-century Lithuania with the aim of promoting greater inwardness, religious piety, and ethical conduct among traditionally minded Jews. There can be little doubt that the impetus for the movement was given by the inroads the Haskalah had made among Russian Jews as well as the success of the Hasidic movement which taught that the traditional study of the Talmud and Codes, while highly significant, did not in itself suffice to promote a sound religious outlook on life. At first the movement sought to influence small circles of businessmen but it soon became a much more elitist movement, attracting, especially, the students in the Lithuanian Yeshivot... " [More.]
Musar movement Lithuania - - - - 1883 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 503. "Musar movement. Jewish ethical movement originating in nineteenth century Lithuania as a response to the secularizing effects of the Enlightenment. Its founder, Rabbi Israel Lipkin Salanter (1810-83), initially worked to promote the study of ethical texts among adults. To this end he organized the Hevrah Musar (Moral Society) of Vilna and the Musar Stuebel (Moral Conventicle) of Kovno. Eventually he directed his efforts to educating the young... After Salanter's death the movement split into two schools, the now predominant 'Slobodka-type' and the more extreme 'Nowardak-type.' The Musar movement survives in the Talmudic academies in the U.S. and Israel. "
Muslim Brotherhood Egypt 2,000,000 - - - 1949 Hallett, Robin. Africa Since 1875. Ann Arbor, Michigan: The University of Michigan Press (1974); pg. 138. "Totally rejecting the attempts being made by other Muslim thinkers to reconcile Islam with modern scientific thought, the Muslim Brotherhood dreamed of recreating a purely Islamic polity governed according to the strict rules of the Shari'a. By the late 1940s the Brotherhood was reckoned to have as many as 2 million members, while it strong Pan-Islamic ideas had gained it supporters in other Arab lands. "
Muslim Brotherhood Egypt - - - - 1965 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 220-221. "Muslim Brotherhood: A fundamentalist Muslim religious and political association founded in Egypt in 1928 by Hassan al-Banna. A popular movement, it did not have parliamentary power and opposed political parties. Responsible for demonstrations and assassinations between 1945-8, it forced Farouk to fight the First Arab-Israeli War. Banned December 1948-51. Banned by the Free Officers in January 1954... Student disturbances in the late 1960s were attributed to the Muslim Brotherhood. "
Muslim Brotherhood Egypt - - - - 1975 Nyrop, Richard F., et al. Area Handbook for Egypt (3rd Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975); pg. 126. "Despite concerted efforts at its suppression, the Muslim Brotherhood continues to exist as a secret society in opposition to the regime. Occasional government announcements of the seizure of members of the brotherhood serve to confirm its ability to survive. With its official dissolution, however, all organized opposition to the government in effect ceased to exist. "
Muslim Brotherhood world 500,000 - - - 1945 Marty, Martin E. & R. Scott Appleby. The Glory and the Power: The Fundamentalist Challenge to the Modern World; Boston: Beacon Press (1992); pg. 151. "After World War II the movement reached a peak of influence, with half a million people actively involved and another half-million supporters and sympathizers. "
Must'ali Ismailis India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 114. "Bohoras... Muslim community in western India whose members, for the most part belong to the Isma'iliyya sect of Shi'ism and recognize al-Must'ali (1094-1101) as Imam and successor to his father al-Mustansir, the Fatmid, against the claims of his brother Nizar. Nizar's adherents are represented in India by the Khojas. The name implies the Hindu origin of the earliest converts to this sect. "
Must'ali Ismailis world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 636. "However, the early beliefs of the Sab'iyya were essentially transformed, and its revolutionary aims gradually gave way to the esoteric and hence quietistic posture of the present day Nizari and of the Must'ali Ismailis. "
Mwera Tanzania - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Myanmar Baptist Convention Myanmar 370,176 - 2,735
units
- 1978 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 153. "According the The American Baptist, in its May and June issues, 1978, the Burma Baptist Convention reported 340,176 baptized believers in 2,375 congregations. At the 107th general meeting of the Convention, 1977, the peak attendance was 15,000 registered delegates... "
Myanmar Baptist Convention Myanmar 500,000 - - - 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). "Overseas Baptists in partner conventions outnumber American Baptists, with 1,800,000.. [including] Myanmar Baptist Convention, with a reported 500,000 members "
Myanmar Baptist Convention Myanmar 555,063 - 3,640
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "


Myanmar Baptist Convention, continued

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