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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to monotheism, world

monotheism, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
monotheism world - - - - 1994 Yenne, Bill. 100 Men Who Shaped World History. San Francisco, CA: Bluewood Books (1994); pg. 10. "Moses. 1300-.1220 BC... Most ancient religions--such as those in Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, Greece and later Rome--were polytheistic... However, the Hebrews, composed of the 12 tribes of Israel, believed in a single deity whom they called Jehovah. In the beginning, monotheism was a distinct minority belief, but today it is the central doctrine for over half of the world's religiously faithful. "
Monothelitism world - - - - 650 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 472. "In the 7th century Honorius, the bishop of Rome, tried to reconcile the opposing parties by giving his support to the view that Christ has only one will, a position called Monothelite (from monos, one and thelema, will). This doctrine was later rejected by the eastern and western churches, but is still held by the Maronites, a sect found mainly in Lebanon. "
Mons Myanmar 4,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "There are 4 million people who consider themselves Mons. They live in the Mon State in the southeastern Burma. The land consists of hills and mountains as well as several small islands in the Andarman Lake. In 1947 the Mon People demanded their own state. The Burmese said no and that resulted in a civil war, which is still going on. At the present moment there exist a cease-fire but tens of thousands of Mons are still living in refugee camps near the Thai border. "
Mons Myanmar: Monland 1,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Mon " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "There are 4 million people who consider themselves Mons. The population of Mon State is about 1 million. Most of the people in Mon State speak Mon, but the official language is Burmese. "
Mons world 4,000,000 - - 1
country
1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "There are 4 million people who consider themselves Mons. They live in the Mon State in the southeastern Burma.
Mons world 4,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Mon " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The former Monland in Burma covers three regions stretching over the whole of lower Burma, namely Tenasserim, Pegu and Irrawaddy. The Mon State covers about 7,640,762 km2, bordering Thailand in the east and Andaman Sea in the west, and includes many small islands along 566 km of coast line. There are 4 million people who consider themselves Mons. The population of Mon State is about 1 million. Most of the people in Mon State speak Mon, but the official language is Burmese. The Mon have never been allowed to teach in their native language. Organisations: The Mon people are represented in UNPO by the Mon Unity League (MUL). "
Montagnais Quebec - - 9
units
- 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 89. "Montagnais... They lived in sourthern Labrador, between the St. Lawrence Estuary and James Bay... They were linked to the Naskapi and Cree by a similarity in language. Their traditional enemies were the Micmac and, especially, the Iroquois. Most converted to Christianity and became trusted trade and war partners of the French. Thei scarcity of fur-bearing animals and the presence of famine, war, and epidemics threatened them with extinction. They live on nine reservations in Quebec. "
Montanism Roman Empire - - - - 150 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 325. "Montanism. As noted in the section on Gnosticism, Montanus, a 2nd century Phrygian enthusiast, claimed direct inspiration by the Holy Spirit. Practicing charismatic prophecy, many of Montanus's followers were women, who were allowed to teach, heal, and exorcise demons. "
Montanism Roman Empire - - - - 156 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1875. "The Christian sect of followers of the prophet Montanus originated in Asia Minor and spread to other parts of the Roman Empire... The movement seems to have begun in Phrygia c 156 AD... In c 172 synods of bishops in Asia condemned them... In doctrine it differed only slightly from the Christianity traditional in Phrygia when it arose; it was not heretical and, in intention, it was not schismatic. It led to schism only when it was condemned by the bishops of Asia Minor. "
Montanism Roman Empire - - - - 500 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1875. "The conversion of the Roman Empire Constantine and the rise of the Christian Empire resulted in edicts that made Montanism illegal, though tombstones from Asia Minor show tht there were adherents of the movement in the 4th century... As late as 550 a bishop of Ephesus dug up the corpses of Montanus and the prophetesses, and burned them. Under Justinian, a large group of Montanists committed suicide. By the 6th century the movement had obviously outlived it soriginal purpose, the preparation of the Christian community for life in the heavenly Jerusalem which was to appear immediately. It lived on, however, as a movement of protest against the worldiness of the Byzantine Church... "
Montanism world - - - - 150 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "MONTANISM: a prophetic movement in the second century led by women which preached the imminent return of CHRIST. It seemed to court martyrdom and practice extreme ASCETICISM. TERTULLIAN is often [said to have joined] the Montanists. While it is true that he strongly defended their civil liberties, there is no solid evidence that he actually joined the group. "
Montanism world - - - - 170 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 492. "Montanism (Chritian). An ecstatic prophetic movement named after its founder Montanus (ca. A.D. 170). It was known until the fourth century as the 'Phrygian heresy' (from its place of origin and greatest support)... "
Montanism world - - - - 170 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 56. "this thought of the special dispensation of the Holy Spirit, combined with a fresh outburst of the early prophetic enthusiasm... were represented in Montanism... About 156 Montanus proclaimed himself the passive instrument through whom the Holy Spirit spoke... They now affirmed... the end of the world as at hand, and that the heavenly Jerusalem was about to be established in Phrygia, whither believers should [go]... The movement speedily attained considerable proportions... Its progress was not easily checked, even by the death of the last of its original prophets... in 179. Soon after 170 it was represented in Rome, and for years the Roman church was more or less in turmoil by it. In Carthage it won Tertullian, about 200... Though gradually driven out by the dominant church, Montanism continued to be represented in the Orient till long after the acceptance of Christianity by the imperial govt. In Carthage the followers of Tertullian persisted till the time of Augustine. "
Montanism world - - - - 203 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 302. "Montanus and two women named Prisca and Maximilla led a movement of charismatic prophecy in 2nd-century Phrygia in Asia Minor, claiming they were directly inspired by the Holy Spirit, or Paraclete. Many of Montanus' followers were women, who were allowed to teach, heal, and exorcise demons. Their most famous adherent was Tertullian of Carthage (c. 203), the great early Christian theologian, who first attacked the charismatic movement and then joined it. Nonetheless, the orthodox church, led by Irenaeus... attacked Montanism... "
Montauk North America - Eastern Woodlands 6,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Montauk world 6,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Moor Spain - - - - 718 C.E. Cross, Esther & Wilbur Cross. Spain (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1985); pg. 32. "By the year 718, Spain was completely under the domination of the Moors. They were to rule all of Spain for about three centuries, and for much longer in some parts. Their last stronghold was Granada. "
Moor Spain - - - - 1505 C.E. Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 38. "...two edicts issued in 1492 and 1502. In essence what these edicts declared was that in the matter of religion, Moors and Jews, as the major non-Christian groups in Spain, had two alternatives: they could convert to Catholicism or face exile from Spain... Moors and Jews who converted to Catholicism publicly but persisted in practicing clandestine non-Christian rites were simply asking for their turn under the knife of the Inquisition. By 1505 most Moors and Jews still residing in Spain had at least gone through the motions of conversion, yet their orthodoxy and the sincerity of their beliefs remained highly suspect. "
Moor Sri Lanka 1,155,000 7.00% - - 1988 Zimmermann, Robert. Sri Lanka (series: "Enchantment of the World "). Chicago: Childrens Press (1992); pg. 18-19. An ethnic group. "Sri Lanka's population had reached over 16.5 million in 1988... "; Pg. 19: "...The other [cultural] groups are the Tamils, 18%; the Moors, 7%; and very small groups (Eurasians, Burghers, Malays, Pakistanis, Europeans, and Veddahs), 1%. "
Moor Sri Lanka 1,225,000 7.00% - - 1997 Russell, Malcom B. The Middle East and South Asia 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 204. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Moorish Science Temple USA - - 1
unit
- 1913 Lincoln, C. Eric. The Black Muslims in America (Third Edition, with a new "Postscript "; 1st printing 1961). Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (1994); pg. 248. "About 1913, a 47-year-old North Carolina black man named Timothy Drew established a 'Moorish Science Temple' in Newark, New Jersey. From this seed grew a movement that... " [Arthur Donaldson Bey wrote to us, explaining that Drew "expressly rejected being called black, as this was conjured up by the conquering European nations, and is EXACTLY what he was against. " Drew identified himself as a "Moor. " Any error in the quote above comes from Lincoln's book, not from this website. Likewise, any error on this website in quotations referring to Drew are the errors of the authors of the books from which these quotes are taken.]
Moorish Science Temple USA 100,000 - - - 1934 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993); pg. 91-92. "An article in the Sept. 7, 1934, issue of the Newark Evening News... reported tha there were at that time more than 100,000 memers of the national order in the United States. "
Moorish Science Temple USA - - - - 1945 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993). [Orig. source: Melton, The Encyclopedia of American Religions]; pg. 92. "The movement continued to spread through the 1940s, to Charleston, W. Val.;, Milwaukee, Wis.; Richmond, Va.; Cleveland, Ohio; Flint, Mich.; Chattanooga, Tenn.; Indianapolis, Ind.; Toldedo and Stubenville, Ohio; Indiana Harbor, Ind.; and Brooklyn, N.Y. "
Moorish Science Temple USA 30,000 - - - 1945 Lincoln, C. Eric. The Black Muslims in America (Third Edition, with a new "Postscript "; 1st printing 1961). Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (1994); pg. 248. "About 1913, a 47-year-old North Carolina black man named Timothy Drew established a 'Moorish Science Temple' in Newark, New Jersey. From this seed grew a movement that, at its peak, had established temples in Detroit, Harlem, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, and numerous cities across the South. Membership may have been as high as twenty or thirty thousand during the lifetime of 'the Prophet,' as Drew was called. " [Drew rejected the term "black "; he identified himself as a "Moor. "]
Moorish Science Temple USA - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 438. "Of more than a dozen significant subgroups of black American Muslims, most are aligned with mainstream Islam, but some theological splinter groups have survived, including the Moorish Science Temple of Noble Drew Ali (Timothy Drew, 1886-1929), founded in Newark, N.J., in 1913... " [Drew rejected the term "black "; he identified himself as a "Moor. "]
Moral Majority USA 400,000 - - - 1981 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998); pg. 66-67. "By the time of its second anniversary, Moral Majority claimed chapters in all fifty states. In 1981, the organization spent more than $6 million, mostlyon media activities... The organization claimed to have more than four million members. But this was a mailing list figure; a more modest estimate put membership at about four hundred thousand, which was still impressive given the newness of the Christian Right. "
Moral Majority USA 4,000,000 - - - 1981 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998); pg. 66-67. "...Moral Majority... In 1981... The organization claimed to have more than four million members. But this was a mailing list figure; a more modest estimate put membership at about four hundred thousand... "
Moral Re-Armament Australia - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "In Australia at the end of World war II a young architect, William Coffey, gave up a promising career with the firm of Leighton Irwin (for instance he managed the construction of the Royal Albert Hospital). He and his wife Eunice became the first unsalaried full-time workers for MRA in this country. The Oxford group had already started to become known in Australia between the wars through Buchman's own first visit in 1925, and through Australian supporters such as the prominent Melbourne clergyman Irving Benson. "
Moral Re-Armament United Kingdom - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1884. "Britons known to be prominent supporters of the movement include Mrs Mary Whitehouse, the tireless campaigner against B.B.C. programmes of which she disapproves... She has denied that her 'National Viewers' and Listeners' Association is backed by, or is a front for, MRA; but many of her utterances are almost identical with the late Peter Howard's denunciations of the B.B.C. "
Moral Re-Armament world - - - - 1921 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1882. "Moral Rearmament. This movement, which has spread throughout the non-Communist world in the last half-century, was founded by Dr. Frank Nathan Daniel Buchman, a Lutheran pastor of German-Swiss ancestry who was born in 1878 at Pennsburg, a small town in Pennsylvania... The present name of the movement was coined by Buchman in Germany in 1938... Previously it had been known as the Oxford Group or Oxford Group Movement. This name excited disapproval in some quarters at Oxford University and among Anglo-Catholics who feared that it might cause confusion with the Oxford Movement of the Tractarians, the Catholic revival in the Church of England which had begun in 1833... The Group... had, in effect, been formed in an undergraduate's rooms at Oxford in 1921... the words 'Oxford Group' had been attached to it in 1929, almost by accident, a South African railway porter having scribbled the phrase on their luggage. "
Moral Re-Armament world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1884. "Buchman died in 1961. Notable admirers from all over the world, including a grandson of Gandhi and many Christian prelates, attended his funeral at Allentown, Pennsylvania... His succesor as leader of MRA was Peter Howard... In 1965 MRA suffered a severe blow in Howard's unexpected death... In the last few years the movement, though still active in Asia (especially in Japan), at its European headquarters at Caux, Switzerland, and through plays conveying its message to (largely) invited audiences at the Westminster Theatre, London, has been less heard of in Briton and America. "
Moral Re-Armament world - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "So far, 65 religious groups and associations have completed a questionnaire and are listed below... Moral Re-Armament (MRA) originated in the first decade of this century, although it was only known by its present name after 1938. In 1908 in Keswick, England, a 30-year-old Lutheran Minister from Pennsylvania, Frank N.D Buchman, had a renewing Christian experience that changed the course of his life and led to the world-spanning work that developed around him. In its seminal effect it could be compared to John Wesley's experience in 1738 in Aldersgate Street. The experience freed Buchman from a consuming resentment against a committee that he felt had wronged him by undermining effective work he was undertaking for the poor of Philadelphia. "
Moravian Maryland - 1.00% 1
unit
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 211.
Moravian Maryland - 0.12% 1
unit
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 211. Denominational % (1%) multiplied by state's adherence rate from table on pg. 27: 12%.
Moravian Maryland - whites - 0.17% 1
unit
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 211. Denominational % (1%) multiplied by state's adherence rate from table on pg. 27: 17%. [Figure for whites calculated separately for southern states where large numbers of black slaves, few of whom were religiously affiliated at this time; otherwise southern denominational % figures are skewed lower.]
Moravian New Jersey - 0.80% 2
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 252.
Moravian New Jersey - 0.21% 2
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 252. Denominational % (0.8%) multiplied by state's adherence rate from table on pg. 27: 26%.
Moravian New York - 2.30% 5
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 220.
Moravian New York - 0.34% 5
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 220. Denominational % (2.3%) multiplied by state's adherence rate from table on pg. 27: 15%.
Moravian North Carolina - 3.00% 5
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 165.
Moravian North Carolina - 0.27% 5
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 165. Denominational % (3%) multiplied by state's adherence rate from table on pg. 27: 9%.
Moravian North Carolina - whites - 0.42% 5
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 165. Denominational % (3%) multiplied by state's adherence rate from table on pg. 27: 14%. [Figure for whites calculated separately for southern states where large numbers of black slaves, few of whom were religiously affiliated at this time; otherwise southern denominational % figures are skewed lower.]
Moravian Pennsylvania - 2.60% 14
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 535.
Moravian Pennsylvania - 0.62% 14
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 535. Denominational % (2.6%) multiplied by state's adherence rate from table on pg. 27: 24%.
Moravian Rhode Island - 1.10% 1
unit
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 87.
Moravian Rhode Island - 0.22% 1
unit
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 277-281. Table A.1: "Denominational Percentages by Colony, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total num. of congreg. = 87. Denominational % (1.1%) multiplied by state's adherence rate from table on pg. 27: 20%.
Moravian USA - - 31
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); [Orig. source: Paullin (1932)]; pg. 25. Table 2.1: "Numbers of Congregations per Denomination, 1776 "
Moravian USA - Middle Colonies - 1.80% - - 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 29-30. Table 2.1: "Denominational Percentages by Region, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total Num. of congreg: 1,285.
Moravian USA - South - 0.60% - - 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 29-30. Table 2.1: "Denominational Percentages by Region, 1776, Based on Number of Congregations "; Total Num. of congreg: 845.
Moravian world - - - - 1467 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "MORAVIANS: a PROTESTANT denomination that traces its origins to John HUSS (1372-1415). They broke with the ROMAN CATHOLIC Church in 1467 by ordaining their own Ministers... Under [Count von Zinzendorf's] leadership they became an aggressive and controversial religious movement building large followings in the Netherlands, Germany, Britain and in North America. After 1732 the movement played an important role in developing a MISSIONARY consciousness among Protestants and through its influence on John WESLEY, made a major impact on nineteenth century religious life. "
Moravian world 100,000 - - - 1500 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 493. "Moravians... In 1467 they broke with the Catholic Church by ordaining their own ministers. The movement flourished, numbering 100,000 by 1500. "
Moravian Church Barbados - - 3
units
- 1998 *LINK* tourism page: "Fun Barbados " Barbados Religion page: church listing. "Currently there are around 60 Anglican churches that can be found on the island and over the years many other denominations have joined and can be found list below. "
Moravian Church Bohemia - - 60
units
- 1550 C.E. Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 168. "By the middle of the sixteenth century there were about 60 congregations in Bohemia, between 80 and 90 in Moravia, and, somewhat later, 40 in Poland. "
Moravian Church Canada 2,126 - 9
units
- 1991 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 244-247. Table 1: Canadian Current Statistics. (# of adherents is from table's "inclusive membership " column, not the sometimes smaller "full communicant or confirmed members " col.) Listed as "Moravian Church of America, Northern Province, Canadian District of "
Moravian Church Czechoslovakia 5,395 - 10
units
- 1942 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 507. Table: "General Statistics " [of the Moravian Church]; Czechoslovakia Province: 1,232 communicants, Total membership: 5,395.
Moravian Church Europe 18,828 - 77
units
- 1942 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 507. Table: "General Statistics " [of the Moravian Church]; British Province: 3,166 communicants, Total membership: 3,524; Czechoslovakia Prov.: 1,232 comm., Total membership: 5,395; Continental Prov. (Europe): 8,022 comm., 9,909 total.
Moravian Church Guyana 2,000 - - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: Operation World 1979); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total pop.: 800,000. Hindus 30%; Muslims 8%; Roman Catholics 12%; Protestants 40%. Protestant community 282,000. Denominations 20. Major groups: Anglicans 130,000 adherents; Lutherans 14,000; Moravians 2,000. Evangelicals 6%.
Moravian Church Moravia - - 90
units
- 1550 C.E. Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 168. "By the middle of the sixteenth century there were about 60 congregations in Bohemia, between 80 and 90 in Moravia, and, somewhat later, 40 in Poland. The numbers remained virtually the same until the outbreak of the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648). Fierce persecution under the Hapsburgs at that time almost exterminated the church, but it survived. "
Moravian Church Nicaragua - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 330-331. "Location: Nicaragua; Population: 4.4 million "; "The 10% of the population that are Protestant chiefly live in the Caribbean part of the nation. The Moravian Church is dominant in this region; almost all Miskito and many Creoles are Moravian. "
Moravian Church North America 36,916 - - - 1942 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 507. Table: "General Statistics " [of the Moravian Church]; American Province, North: 18,553 communicants, Total membership: 22,486; American Province, South: 10,660 communicants, 14,430 total membership.
Moravian Church North America 55,927 - 160
units
- 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), Section: Scandinavian Pietism; pg. 182-183. "Moravian Church in America... Congregations of the Moravian Church continue to be concentrated in Pennsylvania and North Carolina, though some are scattered around the country... Membership: In 1987, the Northern Province reported a membership of 34,205 and the Southern Province reported 21,722 for a total membership of 55,927. There were 178 active ministers in 160 churches. "
Moravian Church North America 60,000 - 180
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 169. "Moravian Church (Unitas Fratrum)... Membership totals 60,000 in 180 churches, concentrated in eastern Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and the Kuskokwim River Valley in Alaska... The Moravian Church in North America is divided into three provinces--northern, southern, and Alaska. "
Moravian Church North America 51,000 - 160
units
- 1994 *LINK* web page: "The Moravian Church " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999); "Last updated: 24-Jul 97 "; author: Jim Boddie, boddie@prolog.net In the Northern American Province there are 30,000 members in 104 congregations, Southern American Province there are 21,000 members in 56 congregations
Moravian Church North America 51,000 - 160
units
- 1997 *LINK* web site: "The Moravian Church " (1998) [ "Last updated: 24-Jul 97 "]; "Author: This information compiled and authored by: Jim Boddie (boddie@prolog.net) " "Statistics as of 12/94... In the Northern American Province there are 30,000 members in 104 congregations located in DC, MD, NJ, NY, OH, ON, PA, IL, IN, MI, MN, ND, WI, AZ, CA and AB. In the Southern American Province there are 21,000 members in 56 congregations located in FL, GA, NC and VA. "
Moravian Church North America 39,153 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) [Orig. source: Directory and Statistics, Moravian Church Northern and Southern Provinces, 1998] -


Moravian Church, continued

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