Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Modekngei, Palau

Modekngei, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Modekngei Palau 5,976 33.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: InfoPlease.com (1998) "Population (1998 est.): 18,110... Religion: Christian. About one-third of the islanders observe Modekngei religion, indigenous to Palau "
Modoc North America - Pacific Coast 800 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Modoc world 800 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mohave North America 3,000 - - - 1680 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 62. "Mohave... Estimated at 3,000 in 1680, about 700 are on the reservation today. "
Mohave North America 700 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 58. "Mohave... Estimated at 3,000 in 1680, about 700 are on the reservation today. "
Mohave North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 3,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mohave world 3,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mohawk Canada 9,305 - - - 1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 252. "The total population of Iroquois today is over 60,000 (according to the US Census of 1990 and Canadian Census of 1991). " Table showing tribes of the Iroquois nation (Mohawk, Oneida, Seneca, Tuscarora, Onondaga, Cayaga), and population of the tribe. [NOTE: This is a measure of tribal affiiation. Most Iroquois today are Christian.]
Mohawk USA 17,106 - - - 1990 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 252. "The total population of Iroquois today is over 60,000 (according to the US Census of 1990 and Canadian Census of 1991). " Table showing tribes of the Iroquois nation (Mohawk, Oneida, Seneca, Tuscarora, Onondaga, Cayaga), and population of the tribe. [NOTE: This is a measure of tribal affiiation. Most Iroquois today are Christian.]
Mohegan North America - Eastern Woodlands 2,200 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mohegan world 2,200 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mohica Peru - - - - 200 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1423-1424. "Further to the north [in Peru], again in the early centuries AD, another culture had arisen. These Mohica people lived in city states, were apparently often at war with each other, and built temples on great pyramidal mounds of brick... Presumably this was part of the cult of the dead for the best vases are all found in the pits in the coastal sands... "; pg. 1424: "In the 10th and 11th centuries central and southern Peru and all the highland regions fell into a state of chaos of small conflicting tribal states. Only on the northern half of the coastwas there much development. The Mohica towns were taken over by a warrior group who came on balsa rafts from the north, led by a great king known as the Great Chimu. "
Mohists China 0 - - - 50 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Taoism; pg. 198. "Mohists: Followers of Mo Ti (Mo-tzu or 'Master Mo,' 5th-4th centuries BC), who opposed the teaching of Confucius... Not quite pacifists, the Mohists believed in self-defense, and since many of them were engineers, they excelled in creating defenses and defensive weapons for cities under siege. By the 4th century BC, Mo-Tzu's system was rivaling Confucianism, but it died out around the 1st century AD. "
Moi Asia - Southeast 500,000 - - 3
countries
1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 68. "In the mountains of central Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia live a number of primitive tribes whose total population is pehaps 500,000. They are called colectively by the Vietnamese word Moi, a generic term that means simply 'savage.' The Laotians call them the Kha and the Cambodians the Pnong. They live in the inaccessible jungle areas of the Indochina peninsula... "
Moksha Foundation Australia - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Moksha Foundation official web site; web page: "What is Moksha?/Moksha Foundation " (viewed 22 July 1999). "Based in Lenox, Massachusetts, Moksha Foundation centers... also... in London, Boston, Amsterdam, Cologne [Germany], Sydney [Australia] and in Rishikesh, India. "
Moksha Foundation Germany - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Moksha Foundation official web site; web page: "What is Moksha?/Moksha Foundation " (viewed 22 July 1999). "Based in Lenox, Massachusetts, Moksha Foundation centers... also... in London, Boston, Amsterdam, Cologne [Germany], Sydney [Australia] and in Rishikesh, India. "
Moksha Foundation India - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Moksha Foundation official web site; web page: "What is Moksha?/Moksha Foundation " (viewed 22 July 1999). "Based in Lenox, Massachusetts, Moksha Foundation centers... also... in London, Boston, Amsterdam, Cologne [Germany], Sydney [Australia] and in Rishikesh, India. "
Moksha Foundation Massachusetts - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* Moksha Foundation official web site; web page: "What is Moksha?/Moksha Foundation " (viewed 22 July 1999). "Based in Lenox, Massachusetts, Moksha Foundation centers... also... in London, Boston, Amsterdam, Cologne [Germany], Sydney [Australia] and in Rishikesh, India. "
Moksha Foundation Netherlands - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Moksha Foundation official web site; web page: "What is Moksha?/Moksha Foundation " (viewed 22 July 1999). "Based in Lenox, Massachusetts, Moksha Foundation centers... also... in London, Boston, Amsterdam, Cologne [Germany], Sydney [Australia] and in Rishikesh, India. "
Moksha Foundation United Kingdom - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Moksha Foundation official web site; web page: "What is Moksha?/Moksha Foundation " (viewed 22 July 1999). "Based in Lenox, Massachusetts, Moksha Foundation centers... also... in London, Boston, Amsterdam, Cologne [Germany], Sydney [Australia] and in Rishikesh, India. "
Moksha Foundation USA - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* Moksha Foundation official web site; web page: "What is Moksha?/Moksha Foundation " (viewed 22 July 1999). "Based in Lenox, Massachusetts, Moksha Foundation centers... also... in London, Boston, Amsterdam, Cologne [Germany], Sydney [Australia] and in Rishikesh, India. "
Moksha Foundation world - - 7
units
6
countries
1999 *LINK* Moksha Foundation official web site; web page: "What is Moksha?/Moksha Foundation " (viewed 22 July 1999). "Moksha Foundation began in 1986 as a small group of individuals and has grown into an international community of students and supporters. Recent years have seen a rapidly growing interest in the activities of this organization and the birth of a number of centers and communities throughout the world that are dedicated to its work. Based in Lenox, Massachusetts, Moksha Foundation centers have also been established in London [U.K.], Boston, Amsterdam [Netherlands], Cologne [Germany], Sydney [Australia] and in Rishikesh, India. " [closely associated with FACE Centers]
Molala North America - Pacific Coast 500 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Molala world 500 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Moldovan Orthodox Moldova 4,350,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; listed in table as "Russian (Moldovan) Orthodox "; So I've included this statistic three times: As "Russian (Moldovan) Orthodox ", "Russian Orthodox " and "Moldovan Orthodox "
Molokan Russia 100,000 - - - 1900 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "Molokans, like the Doukhobors, are sectarian Bible-centered Christians who evolved from Spiritual Christian Russian peasants who refused to join the Russian Orthodox Church in the 1600s. A Russian who was not Orthodox was 'sectarian'. During the 1800s both sects became widespread in Southern Russia. For insisting on religious freedom, many were persecuted by the Church and State, and many expelled to the Transcaucasus. By 1900, Molokans numbered over 100,000 in Russia. About 2,500 migrated to America just before the Russian Revolution. "
Molokan Russia 10,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "Today, approximately 20,000 people ethnically identify themselves as Molokans. They are equally divided between Russia and America, with a few in Australia. In Russia, almost all of the over a million descendants of the Molokans know very little about their past. Mainly elderly women (babushki) persist to revive the religion. "
Molokan Russia - - 150
units
- 1999 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "Over 200 active Molokan churches exist worldwide. In Russia, most Molokan churches re-appeared due to laws now permitting religious freedom. The 150 Russian Molokan communities are mostly in the south, concentrated in the Northern Caucasus, throughout the Stavropol'skii krai, and the eastern Rostov oblast, Tselinskii raion. Since the reorganization of the former Soviet Union, almost all Russians, including Molokans, have been driven from the Caucasus. Of those who weren't resettled with existing Molokan communities, many were resettled throughout the Krasnodarskii oblast and Chernskii raion in the south Tula oblast. "
Molokan USA 2,500 - - - 1915 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "By 1900, Molokans numbered over 100,000 in Russia. About 2,500 migrated to America just before the Russian Revolution. "
Molokan USA 10,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "Today, approximately 20,000 people ethnically identify themselves as Molokans. They are equally divided between Russia and America, with a few in Australia... In America, about one-third of the descendants of the migration claim ethnic identity, and fewer regularly associate with Molokans other than close relatives. "
Molokan USA - - 30
units
- 1999 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "Today over 200 Molokan churches exist worldwide, 30 in America. There is no central church or organization. Demographics describes where 20,000 ethnic Molokans live around the world, with maps. "
Molokan USA - West - - 30
units
- 1999 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "In America, 30 churches currently exist on the West Coast, most on the East Side of the Los Angeles area, where 60% of American Molokans reside. After immigrating, numerous agricultural communes were started in Central California, Arizona, Mexico, Washington, Hawaii, New Mexico, and Idaho. The end of the WWI and the depression cause most to return to the Los Angeles area. "
Molokan world 500,000 - - - 1890 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "In the late 1800s, estimates for the Molokan population ranged from 100,000 to half a million. Less than 3% (about 2,500) joined the migration to America. Since then Molokan identity has dwindled, in Russia because of Stalin's purges and ban on religion, and in America because of many influences, such as language, cultural clash, intermarriage, competing religions, etc. "
Molokan world 20,000 - 200
units
- 1999 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "Today over 200 Molokan churches exist worldwide, 30 in America. There is no central church or organization. Demographics describes where 20,000 ethnic Molokans live around the world, with maps. "
Molokan world 20,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "Today, approximately 20,000 people ethnically identify themselves as Molokans. They are equally divided between Russia and America, with a few in Australia. "
Molokan world - - 200
units
- 1999 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "Over 200 active Molokan churches exist worldwide. "
Molokan - attend at least yearly USA 5,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "Today the descendant population of Molokans in America numbers an estimated 20,000... not all maintained church membership. Of those... and an estimated 2,000 are regular worshipers. "
Molokan - attend regularly USA 2,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web page: "Molokan HomePage " (viewed 14 May 1999). By A.J. Conovaloff. "Today the descendant population of Molokans in America numbers an estimated 20,000. About half have married within the Molokan community, but not all maintained church membership. Of those perhaps as many as 5,000 attend church gatherings at least annually... "
Molokan Spiritual Christians (Postojannye) USA 2,000 - - - 1975 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Other European Free Traditions; pg. 327. "Molokan Spiritual Christians (Postojannye)... San Francisco, CA [H.Q.]... Membership: Not reported. There were an estimated 2,000 Postojannye Molokans in the mid 1970s. They live in San Francisco, the greater Bay area and in Woodburn, Oregon. "
Molokan Spiritual Christians (Pryguny) Arizona - - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 327-328. "Molokan Spiritual Christians (Pryguny)... There is also a group in Glendale, Arizona... "
Molokan Spiritual Christians (Pryguny) California 3,500 - - - 1912 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 328. "The Pryguny Molokons... settled in Los Angeles... Various studies of the community found an estimated 3,500 (1912)... "
Molokan Spiritual Christians (Pryguny) California 5,000 - - - 1929 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 328. "The Pryguny Molokons... settled in Los Angeles... Various studies of the community found an estimated 3,500 (1912), 5,000 (late 1920s)... "
Molokan Spiritual Christians (Pryguny) California 15,000 - - - 1970 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 328. "The Pryguny Molokons... settled in Los Angeles... Various studies of the community found an estimated 3,500 (1912), 5,000 (late 1920s), and then 15,000 (1970). "
Molokan Spiritual Christians (Pryguny) Mexico - - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 327-328. "Molokan Spiritual Christians (Pryguny)... There is also a... small group in Baja California. "
Molokan Spiritual Christians (Pryguny) North America 20,000 - - - 1985 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Other European Free Traditions; pg. 327-328. "Molokan Spiritual Christians (Pryguny)... Los Angeles, CA [H.Q.]... Among numerous free evangelical groups which derived from the Russian orthodox Church, only a few have come to the U.S... The Pryguny Molokans, the largest group to migrate to the U.S., settled in Los Angeles from which they have moved into surrounding suburbs and communities... Churches can be foundin Kerman, Porterville, Sheridan, Shafter, Delano, Elmira, and San Marcos, California. There is also a group in Glendale, Arizona and a small group in Baja California. Membership: Not reported. There are an estiamted 15,000 to 20,000 Prygun Molokons as of the mid-1980s. "
Mon-Khmer hill tribespeople Asia - Southeast 100,000 - - - 1975 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 539-540. Chapter about Mon-Khmer Groups: "In the late 1960s, the hill people were estimated to number between 70,000 and 100,000. Present-day estimates of their numbers are about the same. Population figures are difficult to determine because of the geographical roughness of the terrain and its isolation from lowland Cambodians. "; Pg. 540: The people of the hill tribes continue the traditional beliefs and practices of their ancestors... "
Mon-Khmer hill tribespeople Asia - Southeast 100,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 539-540. "Mountain Mon-Khmer Groups: Alternate Names: Hill tribespeople; Location: Cambodia; Laos; Thailand; Viet Nam; Population: 70,000-100,000; Language: Mon-Khmer; Austronesian; Religion: Traditional spirit-based beliefs "; Pg. 540: The people of the hill tribes continue the traditional beliefs and practices of their ancestors. they believe that magical spirits live in the natural world, thus inhabiting rocks, mountains, rivers, and trees... "
Mon-Khmer hill tribespeople Cambodia - 1.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 539-540. "Mountain Mon-Khmer Groups: Alternate Names: Hill tribespeople; Location: Cambodia; Laos; Thailand; Viet Nam; Population: 70,000-100,000; Language: Mon-Khmer; Austronesian; Religion: Traditional spirit-based beliefs "; "Among the ethnic Khmer, Chinese, Vietnamese, and other groups who live in Cambodia are the hill tribespeople. These tribespeople are not ethnic Khmer, as are the vast majority of Cambodians. Numbering less than 1 or 2% of the Cambodian population... "
Mongo Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Mongol China: Inner Mongolia - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 41. "In Inner Mongolia, the Han have predominated for decades, and now represent 90 percent of the population. On the other hand, more Mongols live in this region than in the neighboring namesake country to the north, Mongolia. It is mainly the nomadic population who are Mongolians; almost all settled farmers, entrepeneurs and people living in towns and cities are Han Chinese. "
Monophysite Church Ethiopia - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 841. "Ethiopia... The nation is made up of a wide variety of peoples, faiths and cultures; it is dominated by the Monophysite Church... to which the Emperor and most of the ruling class owe allegiance... Yet, although Christianity is the official religion, almost half the population is Moslem and considerable numbers of pagans thrive in isolated groups throughout the land. "
Monophysite Church world 80,000 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 29. "Antiochene (Syrian) Rite: The complexus... originally used in the patriarchate of Antioch. This rite in variants is followed by the Syrian Jacobites, who are divided into a Monophysite Church with 80,000 members, and a Catholic Church with 71,000 members. "
Monophysitism Egypt - - - - 451 C.E. Corrick, James A. The Byzantine Empire. San Diego: Lucent Books (1997); pg. 46. "Even after the Council of Chalcedon, the citizens of Alexandria refused to give up their belief, which became a symbol of resistance to the central imperial authority. Antioch, the other great rival of constantinople, also embraced Monophysitism. "
Monophysitism Egypt - - - - 641 C.E. Corrick, James A. The Byzantine Empire. San Diego: Lucent Books (1997); pg. 75. "In 641... the Arabs took Egypt... The seventh-century jihad's success was helped greatly by two major factors. First, Heraclius's victory over Persia had been costly. Both the Byzantines and the Persians were drained by their years of war, and they were easy prey for the Muslim armies that burst out of Arabia in 634. Second, when Heraclius had regained Egypt and Syria from the Persians, he had cracked down on the Jews and the Monophysites, the latter making up the bulk of the population of these imperial provinces. These groups saw the arrival of the Arabs, who did not persecute either Christians or Jews, as a way of escaping imperial harassment... Muslim domains profited by not rushing conversions. "
Monophysitism Egypt 650,000 - - - 1970 Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 144. "The native Monophysite body of Egypt can hardly be given a fixed date for its origin. From the Council of Chalcedon the land was increasingly in religious rebellion. That church, the Coptic, is still the main Christian body of Egypt, numbering more than six hundred and fifty thousand adherents, strongly Monophysite to this day in doctrine, under the rule of a patriarch who still takes his title from Alexandria, though his seat has long been in Cairo. "
Monophysitism Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 220. "Monophysites: Followers of a Christian doctrine stemming from a schism at the Council of Chalcedon, 451, which holds that Christ has only one divine nature, as distinct from the usual Christian belief that Christ is both divine and human. The Monophysites doctrine is held by the Orthodox churches of the Copts, the Armenians, the Syrian Jacobites and the Ethiopians. "
Monophysitism Roman Empire - - - - 449 C.E. Corrick, James A. The Byzantine Empire. San Diego: Lucent Books (1997); pg. 45. "In the fifth century over a heresy called Monophysitism, Constantinople found itself in a struggle with Alexandria. Monophysitism dealt with the nature of Christ... concluded that Christ's nature was completely divine... Alexandria was the center of Monophysitism, while Constantinople held to the oppsing view of Christ's nature... To decide the Monophysitism issue, [Pope] Leo called a church council at Ephesus, in western Asia Minor, in 449. At the council, [Monophysitism was approved]... The Alexandrian's tactics led to a storm of protest... As a result, the Ephesus council's decision as not accepted, and a new council was held at 451 at Chalcedon... At Rome and Constantinople's urging, the council of Chalcedon accepted the view that Christ was an equal mixture of God and human... "
Monophysitism Syria - - - - 635 C.E. Corrick, James A. The Byzantine Empire. San Diego: Lucent Books (1997); pg. 75. "...Syria [fell to the Arabs] in 635... The seventh-century jihad's success was helped greatly by two major factors. First, Heraclius's victory over Persia had been costly. Both the Byzantines and the Persians were drained by their years of war, and they were easy prey for the Muslim armies that burst out of Arabia in 634. Second, when Heraclius had regained Egypt and Syria from the Persians, he had cracked down on the Jews and the Monophysites, the latter making up the bulk of the population of these imperial provinces. These groups saw the arrival of the Arabs, who did not persecute either Christians or Jews, as a way of escaping imperial harassment... Muslim domains profited by not rushing conversions. "
Monophysitism world - - - - 451 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 471. "This subject became controversial in the 5th century... The Monophysites (from monos, one and physis, nature) said that Christ had only one nature, the divine. The Council of Chalcedon in 451 AD affirmed that he had two natures, inseparably combined. A number of groups refused to accept this definition and the doctrinal difference merged with racial and linguistic divisions. "
Monophysitism world - - - - 500 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 471. "[after the] Council of Chalcedon in 451 AD... Another branch, the Jacobite, took the Monophysite position, as did the Armenians and the Copts in Egypt. "
Monophysitism world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 492. "Monophysitism (Christian). Generally, adherence to a 'one-nature' Christology; specifically, Eastern Christians opposing the Council of Chalcedon's Christology who established ecclesiastical structures separate from those of Orthodox churches. They include the Coptic, Jacobite, Amrenian, Nubian, and Ethiopic communions. "
Monophysitism world 13,000,000 - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 85. "There are at present between 12 and 13 million Christians worldwide who have, to a lesser or greater extent, identified themselves with one or another of the many variant forms of Monophysitism. Generally it is possible to speak of four main Monophysite Churches: the Syrian Orthodox Church of Antioch (the West Syrian or 'Jacobite' Church), the Armenian Church, the Egyptian ('Coptic') Church, and the Ethiopian Church. "
Monophysitism world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "MONOPHYSITISM: a development of CHRISTOLOGY which taught that in CHRIST there was one divine NATURE... The teaching was condemned at the COUNCIL OF CHALCEDON but flourished in Coptic, Syrian, Armenian and various other branches of CHRISTIANITY. "
Monophysitism world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 322. "The Monophysite churches include the following: Coptic Orthodox Church, non-Chalcedonian Egyptians. The Copts...; Syrian Orthodox Church, sometimes called Jacobite, for the 6th-century bishop Jacob Baradaeus.; Ethiopian Orthodox Church, linked until 1959 with the Copts.; Syrian Orthodox Church of the Malabar (southern India), also known as the St. Thomas Christians, or Mar Thoma, for the apostle Thomas, whom they claimed as their founder and who supposedly suffered martyrdom near Madras. "
monotheism world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2233. "Polytheism. From Greek word for 'many' and 'god', belief in many gods, who preside over different departments of Nature and aspects of life; distinguished from monotheism, belief that there is only one God, and from henotheism, devotion to a single god without asserting that he is the only one. "


monotheism, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.