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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Missionary Church, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Missionary Church USA 47,550 - 333
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Missionary Church
Missionary Church USA 28,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); "last updated October 1998 " Table: "Christian Organizations "; "Membership numbers, as supplied by various denominations "
Missionary Church Washington 314 0.01% 8
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 235. [Listed as 'Missionary Church.']
Missionary Church world - - - - 1969 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 213. "The Missionary Church was formed in 1969 by the merger of the United Missionary Church and the Missionary Church Association. "
Missionary Church world 75,301 - - - 1985 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 213. "Missionary Church... Fort Wayne, IN [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1985 the church reported 26,734 members, 303 churches... in the U.S. and 6,431 members, 92 churches... in Canada. In addition, there were 24,098 baptized members and 18,038 adherents overseas. "
Missionary Church Association Indiana - - - - 1898 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 213. "The Missionary Church Association was formed in 1898 at Berne, Indiana, by a group headed by J. E. Ramseyer. "
Missionary Church Association USA - - - - 1898 Hostetler, John A. Amish Society (3rd ed.; 1st ed. pub. 1963). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1980); pg. 275. "A major cleavage among the Alsatian Amish immigrants [original Amish group] occurred with the emergence of 'Egli Amish' in 1866. Henry Egli, a bishop of the Amish group near Berne, Indiana, claimed to have experienced regeneration of heart... preached the necessity of a vital religious conversion... The followers of Egli organized a separate church, but the same issues sprang up in other Amish groups in Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and Ohio. Egli visited these places and gained many supporters... In 1898, another division occurred within the Egli Amish, over the question of immersion. As a result the Missionary Church Association was formed. The remaining Egli Amish adopted the name 'Defenseless Mennonite,' which they later changed to Evangelical Mennonite Church. "
Missionary Church Association USA 3,600 - 47
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 341. Table: "...the leading holiness groups in the United States at the present time are as follows: " [Table lists figures for "Churches " and "Members " for 28 groups.]
Missionary Church Association world 3,600 - 47
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 495. "Missionary Church Association: A holiness fundamentalist, and premillennial sect with headquarters at Ft. Wayne, Ind. It has 47 churches and 3,600 membrs. It was organized in 1898... "
Missionary Church Association world - - - - 1969 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 213. "The Missionary Church was formed in 1969 by the merger of the United Missionary Church and the Missionary Church Association [thus ending the independent existence of the Missionary Church Association]. "
Missionary Methodist Church of America world 1,708 - 12
units
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 213. "Missionary Methodist Church of America... Morganton, NC [H.Q.]... formed in 1913 in Forest City, NC, by Reverent H. C. Sisk & 4 other former members of the Wesleyan Methodist Church... Membership: In 1984 the Church reported 1,708 membres, 12 congregations, and 32 ministers. "
Missionary/Mission Churches USA 60,000 - - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 15-17. Table 1-2: Self-Described Adherence of U.S. Adult Population 1990. Phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by Graduate School of City U. of New York. [Denominational category listed as "Missionary/Mission Churches "]
Missouri North America 1,000 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 45. Estimates of total population from another source.
Missouri North America - Central Prairies and Woodlands 1,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Missouri world 1,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Missouri Valley Friends Conference USA 150 - 6
units
1
country
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Quakers (Friends); pg. 322. "Missouri Valley Friends Conference... Kansas City, MO [H.Q.]... was formed in 1955 as an association of unprogrammed Quaker meetings in the Midwest which were not affiliated with any other established yearly meeting... Membership: In 1988 the conference reported approx. 150 members in six congregations. "
Mita Movement Illinois: Chicago - - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 260. "Mita Movement... currently has churches in New York City; Jersey City, Passaic, and Paterson, New Jersey; Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia, and Chicago. " [At least one.]
Mita Movement New Jersey - - 3
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 260. "Mita Movement... currently has churches in New York City; Jersey City, Passaic, and Paterson, New Jersey; Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia, and Chicago. "
Mita Movement New York: New York City - - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 260. "Mita Movement... currently has churches in New York City; Jersey City, Passaic, and Paterson, New Jersey; Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia, and Chicago. " [At least one.]
Mita Movement Pennsylvania - - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 260. "Mita Movement... currently has churches in New York City; Jersey City, Passaic, and Paterson, New Jersey; Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia, and Chicago. " [At least one.]
Mita Movement Puerto Rico - - - - 1940 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Deliverance Pentecostals; pg. 259. "Mita Movement... Hata Rey, PR... The Mita Movement is a Puerto Rican Pentecostal movement... It was founded in 1940 by Mrs. Juanita Garcia Peraga, who saw in her sudden healing after a long illness, a divine revelation and a sign that God had chosen her body to be the dwelling place of the Holy Spirit. The name Mita, which she adopted, was given in the revelation. "
Mita Movement Puerto Rico - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 260. At the headquarters in Hato Rey, there is a complex of buildings which includes a home for men, a hospice for women, two restaurants, a supermarket, and some shops. In nearby Arecibo is a home for the aged. "
Mita Movement USA - - 7
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 259-260. "Mita Movement... Hata Rey, PR... The Mita Movement is a Puerto Rican Pentecostal movement imported to the continental U.S. by the immigration of some of its members... The movement was brought to the U.S. after World War II and currently has churches in New York City; Jersey City, Passaic, and Paterson, New Jersey; Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia, and Chicago. Membership: Not reported. "
Mita Movement Washington, D.C. - - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 260. "Mita Movement... currently has churches in New York City; Jersey City, Passaic, and Paterson, New Jersey; Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia, and Chicago. " [At least one.]
Mithraism Armenia - - - - -100 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1862. "...in Armenia, where Mithras was again god of kings and feudalism. In a Mithraic ceremony, King Tiridates I submitted to the Roman Emperor Nero in the 1st century AD... Mithras was also the god of the kings of Commagene, in the south of Armenia. "
Mithraism China - - - - -700 B.C.E. *LINK* web site: "Mithras " (by Payam Nabarz); web page: Introduction (viewed 2 April 1999). "Mithra is also seen in Chinese mythology, where he is known as 'The Friend'. Mithra is represented as a Military General in Chinese statues, and is considered to be the friend of man in this life and his protector against evil in the next. "
Mithraism Europe - - - - 50 C.E. Dhilawala, Sakina. Armenia (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1997); pg. 79. "Zoroastrianism thrived under various Persian dynasties and at one point, the Persian empire spanned the entire 'civilized' world--eastern Greece to northern India. Remnants of the religion were left in Europe, including the cult of Mithraism, derived from Zoroastrianism. It even became the unofficial religion of the Romans. "
Mithraism Iran - - - - -628 B.C.E. *LINK* web site: "Mithras " (by Payam Nabarz); web page: Introduction (viewed 2 April 1999). "Mithra is an Indo-Iranian god, worshipped at least as early as 1400BC. In Hinduism he is praised as the binomial Mitra-Varuna. A hymn is also dedicated to him alone in Rig Veda (3.59)... In Persia Mithra was the protector god of the tribal society until the Zorostaris reformation of Persian polytheism (628-55BC). Mithra like the rest of the gods and goddess of the Iranian Pantheon was stripped of his sovereignty, and all his powers and attributes were bestowed upon Ahura Mazda... "
Mithraism Iran - - - - -486 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1862. "The Persian social system was feudal... Mithras, who represented law and order, was the divine exponent of the Persian system as god of contracts and of all reciprocal relationships... 550 BC, perhaps considerably earlier, Zoroaster... fought passionately against polytheism and against Mithras... the doctrinal teaching of Zoroaster was gradually interspersed with elements of the older polytheism... After Darius, who died in 486 BC, the Persian kings were Zoroastrians. But the aristocracy probably contintinued to be attached to Mithras and the old gods... In the 4th century BC the Kings Artaxerxes II and III mentioned Mithra... in their inscriptions. But by this time, Zoroastrianism was the dominant factor in the blending of the two religions and we hear no more of the Mithraic bull sacrifice. After the destruction of the Persian Empire by Alexander the Great nothing more is heard about the Persian worship of Mithras. "
Mithraism Iran - - - - -300 B.C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "MITHRAISM: an ancient Iranian RELIGION worshiping the GOD MITHRA which became popular as a MYSTERY RELIGION in the Roman Empire, especially among soldiers. The THEOLOGY appears to have been a complex FORM of DUALISM. "
Mithraism Roman Empire - - - - 30 C.E. Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992); pg. 28. "Christianity had lots of rivals other than Judaism. There was the cult of Isis, Mithraism, the official divinities, and Orphic Mysticism. "
Mithraism Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 34. "Much more powerful as a rival to Christianity were the mystery religions that were quite numerous & rapidly spreading during this period. They were syncretistic kinds of faiths that fused Hellenic & Oriental thought. The most important ones were the Dionysian & Orphic mysteries of Thrace; the Eleusinian from Eleusis, near Athens; the religion of the Great Mother, Cybele, from Anatolia in Asia Minor; the Persian religion of Mithra and the Egyptian cult of Isis & Osiris. "
Mithraism Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 35. "The mystery religion that proved to be the most serious rival of Christianity, however, was Mithraism, which was restricted to men and very popular with soldiers. Originating in Persia, it was apparently spread around the Mediterranean by the soldiers of Alexander the Grat. Mithra was a Persian sun god who had slain the cosmic bull whose blood was the source of all life. His images always show him fighting for right against wrong--an appealing idea for soldiers. The cult promised immortality to its initiates. Its shrines have been uncovered in many places, a large one recently in London. "
Mithraism Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1928. "During the Hellenistic period... very little is heard about Mysteries. But at the time of the Roman Empire such religions suddenly sprang up. The best-known are the Mysteries of Isis and Mithras... The destruction of the Persian Empire by Alexander was a precondition for the spread of the Mithraic Mysteries as far as Rome... "
Mithraism Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1928. "The various Mysteries appealed to sociologically different strata of society... followers of Mithras were chiefly in the army and among the Imperial officials... "
Mithraism Roman Empire - - - - 100 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1862. "It is an open question whether the Roman Mithras mysteries were the same religion as the Persian Mithraic cult. The Persian religion changed to accommodate the different conditions of the Roman Empire. Certainly, many elements of the old religion were retained, but at the same time the Roman theology contained elements unknown to the Persians. For example, the Romans took their doctrine of the fate of the soul from Plato's philosophy. One could say that the Roman mysteries were a completely new religion. It may be that there were one or more founders of the new cult, dating from perhaps c 100 AD. The dated Roman Mithras monuments start from c 140 AD. "
Mithraism Roman Empire - - - - 100 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 307-308. "Mithraism was a mystery religion that probably came into existence in the Greco-Roman world, perhaps from Asia Minor, somtime during the 2nd or 1st century BC. Some scholars believe that its origin goes back to much earlier Zoroastrian beliefs... Images of Mithras survive, however, in paintings and sculptures found in hundreds of underground temples, from England to Asia Minor, that Christians overlooked... The Mithraic cult was introduced into Rome near the beginning of the 2nd century AD and proved especially popular among state bureaucrats, Roman legionnaires, and slaves... As paganism waned, Mithraism became Christianity's strongest competitor. The church finally suppressed it inthe 4th century... "
Mithraism Roman Empire - - - - 100 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 10. "The great majority of those who felt religious longings simply adopted Oriental religions... The most popular of these Oriental religions were those of the Great Mother (Cybele) and Attis, originating in Asia Minor; of Isis and Serapis from Egypt; and of Mithras from Persia... That of Mithras, the noblest of all, though having an extended history in the East, did not become conscpicuous at Rome till toward the year A.D. 100, and its great spread was in the latter part of the second and during the third centuries. It was especially beloved of soldiers. In the later years, at least of its progress in the Roman Empire, Mithras was identified with the sun--the Sol Invictus of the Emperors just before Constantine. Like other religions of Persian origin, its view of the universe was dualistic. "
Mithraism Roman Empire - - - - 200 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1862. "The Mithras cult was probably introduced into the legions from above, by officers who were posted from their headquarters in Rome to legions on the frontiers of the empire. The geographical distribution of archeological finds supports this hypothesis. Many Mithraic remains have been excavated in Rome and in areas in military conflict on the frontiers, such as the Euphrates, Danube, Rhine and in Britain; but almost none have been found in the pacified provinces such as Gaul or Spain, apart from the Mithraeum or temple in Merida, Spain, the seat of the Roman governor. "
Mithraism Roman Empire - - - - 300 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1861. "'If Christianity had been arrested in its growth... the world would have been Mithraist', said the French philosopher Ernest Renan, and there is no doubt that this austere, soldierly cult, with its rigorous ordeals undertaken in subterranean chambers, gained an immensely powerful hold in the Roman Empire: there are five temples to Mithras in Britain alone. The Mithraic mysteries made their appeal to soldiers and to officials in the service of the Roman emperors. But exactly how an ancient Persian god found his way to Rome, to be adopted by high-ranking army officers, is still not fully known. "
Mithraism Roman Empire - - - - 387 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1864. "Under Constantine the Great the Mithraic cult lost imperial favour. He publicly supported Christianity and while there are several dated Mithraic monuments up to 312 AD, after that there is only one rom the military frontiers of the empire. A collection of inscriptions from Rome, in which Mithras is mentioned, are dated from 357 to 387 and originate from the groups of pagan Roman senators who had rebelled against the new Christian Empire in Constantinople... These cults of the Roman opposition are no longer characteristic of the Mithraic mysteries, as at that time in Rome a fierce syncretism was being practised; the inscriptions mention Mithras only as one of many pagan gods. The genuine Mithraic mysteries ceased under Constantine, and the triumphant Christian Church erected its basilicas above the underground Mithraic caverns in Rome. "
Mithraism United Kingdom - - - - -55 B.C.E. King, John. The Celtic Druids' Year: Seasonal Cycles of the Ancient Celts. London, UK: Blandford (1994); pg. 43. "Brythonic Druidism, in what is now England, Cornwall and Wales (and, subsequently, Brittany) was affected by Roman influence, but to varying degree. Very often, indigenous Celtic gods continued to be worshipped alongside important Roman gods, with little apparent difficulty. The cult of the sun god Mithras, immensely popular among Roman soldiers, spread widely. "
Mithraism United Kingdom: Britain - - 5
units
- 300 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1861. "...there are five temples to Mithras in Britain alone. The Mithraic mysteries made their appeal to soldiers and to officials in the service of the Roman emperors. "
Mithraism United Kingdom: London - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 35. "...Mithraism... Its shrines have been uncovered in many places, a large one recently in London. "
Mithraism world - - - - -100 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1862. "After the destruction of the Persian Empire by Alexander the Great nothing more is heard about the Persian worship of Mithras. Yet over three centuries later Mithras was worshipped in the states between the Parthian Empire and the Graeco-Roman world, for example, in Armenia, where Mithras was again god of kings and feudalism. In a Mithraic ceremony, King Tiridates I submitted to the Roman Emperor Nero in the 1st century AD... Mithras was also the god of the kings of Commagene, in the south of Armenia. It is likely that Mithridates of Pontus (1st century BC), the great enemy of the Romans, worshipped Mithras; his kingdom included the northern coast of modern Turkey, and the Crimea. Finally, we know from Plutarch that the pirates of Cilicia, the south coast of Turkey, also worshipped Mithras during this period. On the other hand, Mithras was of no importance in the Greek-populated areas of Asia Minor. The Persians were the national enemies of the Greeks... "
Mithraism world - - - - 300 C.E. *LINK* web site: "Mithras " (by Payam Nabarz); web page: Introduction (viewed 2 April 1999). "In the west Mithra is best known as cult of Mithrasi which had an immense popularity among the Roman Legions, From late 1[st century] BC until 4[th century] AD. During which it came under the influence of Greek and Roman mythologies... The Mithraic cult maintained secrecy and its teaching were only reveled to initiates. Remains of Mithraic temples can be found throughout the Roman empire, from Palestine across north of Africa, and across central Europe to North of England. "
Mithraism world - - - - 400 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1861. "During the period between 1400 BC and 400 AD Persians, Indians, Romans and Greeks worshipped the god Mithras. The god was particularly important in the old polytheistic religion of the Persians between the 8th and 6th centuries BC and again in the Roman Empire in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD. "
Miwok North America 11,000 - - - 1770 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 63. "Miwok... They numbered about 11,000 in 1770. Only a few hundred remain today. "
Miwok North America 400 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 63. "Miwok... They numbered about 11,000 in 1770. Only a few hundred remain today. "
Miwok North America - Pacific Coast 11,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Miwok world 11,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mizrachi Israel - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 158. "Mizrachi: Religious Zionist movement founded in 1902. The name Mizrachi is a shortened form of the Hebrew words merkaz ruhani, 'spiritual centre,' and signifies that the aim of Zionism to establish a Jewish state is highly laudable but this State should serve not only as a political focus but also as a spiritual centre for world Jewry. The Mizrachi maxim gives expression to the movement's special emphasis: 'The Land of Israel for the people of Israel in accordance with the Torah of Israel.' The essential problem for the Mizrachi is posed by the obscurity of the final statement of its programme. How was a modern democratic State, comprising both religious and non-religious Jews, to be conducted in accordance with the 'Torah of Israel'? With the establishment of the State of Israel, the Mizrachi became the National Religious party (Mafdal) and still grapples, not very successfully, with this severe problem. "
Mnong Cambodia 25,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 539-540. "The Mnong live in eastern Cambodia along the border with Vietnam. They number between 20,000 and 25,000. " [Not to be confused with Hmong.]
Mnong Gar Vietnam - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 711. "Although the term 'soul' is often used to translate such concepts as k'la of the Sgaw Karen of Burma,... or the heeng of the Mnong Gart of southern Vietnam, and so this term carries a connotation of insubstantiality and immortality which is not necessarily implied by the Southeast Asian concepts... The Mnong Gar..., for example, believe that each person has a quartz-heeng, located behind the forehead, which serves to orient the body; a spider-heeng, located in the head, which can flee the body and must, thus, be returned periodically; and a buffalo-heeng, which exists in the sky where it is cared for by spirits and which will die when the person dies. "
Mobile North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 2,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mobile world 2,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mobo Togo - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Mobutism Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 179. "The close alliance of the Christian churches with colonial regimes has given way to two predominant types of post-independence patterns, both of which disestablish the churches from their hegemonic positions. These are the promotion of religious pluralism...; and the replacement of Christianity by a quasi-religious ideology such as 'Mobutism' (for President Mobutu) in Zaire, or Marxism... "
Mocovi Argentina - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "
Modekngei Palau - - - - 1992 *LINK* web site: "REPUBLIC OF PALAU AN AREA STUDY: FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Region IX "; Written "October 1992 "; (1998) "RELIGION... All of the islands of Palau are predominately Christian with one-third of the pop. practicing Catholicism, one-third Protestant, and the remaining third subscribing to other religions. The traditional religion of Modekngei, which bears strong ties to magic, legend, and myths is still followed by some Palauans. "
Modekngei Palau 5,498 33.00% - - 1995 *LINK* web site, 1998 "Population: 16,661 (July 1995 est.)... Religions: Christian (Catholics, Seventh-Day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, the Assembly of God, the Liebenzell Mission, and Latter-Day Saints), Modekngei religion (one-third of the population observes this religion which is indigenous to Palau) "
Modekngei Palau 5,594 33.00% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: Globetree (1998) "Population: 16,952 (July 1996 est.)... Religion: Christian (Catholics, Seventh-Day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, the Assembly of God, the Liebenzell Mission, and Latter-Day Saints), Modekngei religion (one-third of the pop. observes this religion which is indigenous to Palau) "
Modekngei Palau 5,689 33.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 17,240. Christian (Catholics, Seventh-Day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, the Assembly of God, the Liebenzell Mission, and Latter-Day Saints), Modekngei religion (one-third of pop. observes this religion which is indigenous to Palau)
Modekngei Palau 5,689 33.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "TravelFinder.com " (1998); [copied directly from CIA World Factbook] "Population: 17,240 (July 1997 est.)... Religions: Christian (Catholics, Seventh-Day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, the Assembly of God, the Liebenzell Mission, and Latter-Day Saints), Modekngei religion (one-third of the pop. observes this religion which is indigenous to Palau) "
Modekngei Palau - 28.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; "Modekne " is "a local marginally Christian sect " according to Church of the Nazarene web page.


Modekngei, continued

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