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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Mahasanghika, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Mahayana Buddhism Asia - - - - 1966 Welty, Paul Thomas. The Asians: Their Heritage and Their Destiny (Revised Edition). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1966); pg. 73. "Mahayana, 'Greater Vehicle,' is sometimes called Northern Buddhism because it is emphasized in China, Tibet, and Korea in northern Asia. "
Mahayana Buddhism Bhutan 1,118,740 70.00% - - 1991 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Buddhist:Mahayana:
[Total pop.] estimates vary widely: 1,598,216 in July 1991 but possibly only 700,000. 70 percent Mahayana Buddhists (predominantly Drupka subsect), 25 percent Hindus, 5 percent Muslims. Indeterminate but small number of Bon adherents.
Mahayana Buddhism Bhutan 750,000 75.00% - - 1997 Russell, Malcom B. The Middle East and South Asia 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 53. Estimates of % of population in principal religions, & est. 1997 total pop.; "Population: 600,000 (official, but erroneous estimate, 1990); others suggest more than 1 million... Principal Religions: Mahayana Buddhism (about 75%) and Hinduism. "
Mahayana Buddhism Bhutan - - - - 1998 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site; (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Religion: Bhutan is the only country in the world to adopt Mahayana Buddhism in its Tantric form.
Mahayana Buddhism China - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 44. "The type of Buddhism that is prevalent in China today is the Mahayana (Great Wheel)... "
Mahayana Buddhism Japan 100,000,000 - - - 1993 Rausch, David A. & Carl Hermann Voss. World Religions: Our Quest for Meaning; Trinity Press International: Valley Forge, PA (1993); pg. 110. "Approximately 100 million Japanese claim to belong to one of the many Mahayana Buddhist sects. "
Mahayana Buddhism Korea, South 11,000,000 25.29% - - 1990 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 702-703. "The nation's 1990 census reported a population total of 43.5 million... "; Pg. 703: "Today, the majority of South Korea's religious population is aligned either with Mahayana Buddhism (over 11 million followers) or Christianity (6.5 million Protestants and 1.8 million Roman Catholics). "
Mahayana Buddhism Vietnam - - - - 1966 Welty, Paul Thomas. The Asians: Their Heritage and Their Destiny (Revised Edition). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1966); pg. 298. "The majority of the Vietnamese are regarded as followers of Mahayana Buddhism, but their original animism, and various forms of Taoism imported from China, are also vital elements in their religious life. "
Mahayana Buddhism world - - - - -200 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 150. "Buddhist Sectarianism... By around 200 B.C., a movement began in Buddhism which offered a new literature known as Prajnaparamita or 'perfection of wisdom,' a new Buddhology, a redefinition of the goal of Buddhism (as well as a new path to that goal), a radical new approach to the question of reality, an an attempt to provide a more expansive role to the laity. This new movement referred to itself as Mahayana or 'great vehicle,' while branding the earlier Buddhist sects, which included primarily the Sthaviras, Mahasanghikas, Pudgalavadins, and Theravadins as Hinayana or 'lesser vehicle.' "
Mahayana Buddhism world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1698. Mahayana. Buddhist movement which arose in about the 10th century AD and became the dominant type of Buddhism in China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam... "
Mahayana Buddhism world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 452. "Mahayana. One of the two main branches of Buddhism, the other being Hinayana or Theravada. Mahayana is sometimes termed the Northern School, since it exitss in Tibet, Mongolia, China, Korea, and Japan. "
Mahayana Buddhism world - - - - 1984 Cousins, L. S. "Buddhism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 279. "Eastern Buddhism [Mahayana], practiced in China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam... A meaningful estimate of numbers cannot be given... [many] adhere simultaneously to various practices... " Buddhism one of most influential religions within 1,200 mil. pop.
Mahayana Buddhism world - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 50. "Today Hinayana Buddhism of the Theravada school is to be found in Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Thailand, Burma, & Cambodia; Mahayana in China, Japan, Vietnam, and Korea; Vajrayana in Tibet, Mongolia, and Japan. "
Mahayana Buddhism world 187,040,000 3.36% - - 1993 *LINK* web page: "Buddhism Diverged "; web site: "Supporting Materials: Culture " (Slippery Rock Univ., PA). (viewed 31 Aug. 1999). Last Revised: 10-25-95 "Buddhism diverged... Theravada Buddhism (38%): periods of service, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia; Mahayana Buddhism (56%): personal meditation; China, Korea, Japan, Vietnam; Lamaism (6%): monasteries; Tibet. " [Other page this site indicates 334 million Buddhists, 6% of world pop., in 1993.]
Mahayana Buddhism world 181,380,640 3.17% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Buddhism:Mahayana:
"Buddhists. 56% Mahayana, 38% Theravada (Hinayana), 6% Tantrayana (Lamaism). " Buddhism world total: 323,894,000. Total world population: 5,716,425,000.
Mahayana Buddhism world 182,154,000 3.14% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Buddhism:Mahayana:
"Buddhists. 56% Mahayana, 38% Theravada (Hinayana), 6% Tantrayana (Lamaism). " Buddhism world total: 325,275,000. Total world population: 5,804,120,000.
Mahayana Buddhism world - - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance Buddhist:Mahayana:
Eastern Buddhism is the predominant religion in China, Japan, Korea and much of Vietnam. It underwent severe repression during the 1960's in China during the Cultural Revolution.
Mahdi Sudan - - - - 1885 Wilson, Bryan. "Traditional Religion Divides Society " in Enduring Issues in Sociology (Lynn Barteck & Karen Mullin, editors). San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press (1995). [Originally source: Religious Sects: A Sociological Study. New York: McGraw-Hill (1970)]; pg. 215. "At first glance, sects may appear to be marginal and incidental phenomena in history... Yet, at times, sects have had an immense significance for the course of history... The Mahdi movement in the Sudan in the 1880s, or the Tai-ping movement in China a couple decades earlier, each significantly affected the history of their own peoples and that of people far from the places where these sects arose... "
Mahican North America - Eastern Woodlands 3,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mahican Wisconsin - - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 21. "Mahican... According to oral traditions, the name is from 'Muhheakunnuk,' the name of a local area, referring to the tidewater of the Hudson River near Albany, New York. Other Native people of the region interpreted the name Mahican as an Algonquian word meaning 'wolves'... They lived along the banks of the Hudson River, through northern New York state... Today there is a reservation in Wisconsin. "
Mahican world 3,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mahikari Japan - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "The founder of Mahikari, Yoshikazu Okada (1901-1974), was a member of Sekai Kyusei Kyo before receiving his own revelations in 1959 which have been collected into a scripture called Goseigen. The two sects Mahikari [i.e. Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan] and Sukyo Mahikari both practice a nearly identical form of healing called okiyome, in which God's Light (jorei) is focused through a pendant worn by the practitioner called the omitama. "
Mahishasaka Buddhism world - - - - -150 B.C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 129. "The Hinayana enumerates the traditions of 18 schools that developed out of the original community... Two other schools that splintered from the Sthaviras are the Sarvastivada, out of which, around 150 B.C.E., came the Sautrantikas, and the Vibhajyavadins, who see themselves as orthodox Sthaviras. Out of this last school arose the Theravada, Mahishasakas, and Kashyapiyas; from the Mahishasakas came the Dharmaguptakas. "
Mahishasaka Buddhism world - - - - -150 B.C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 216. "Mahishasaka... Hinayana school, which split off from the school of the Vibhajyavadins in the second century B.C.E. and later produced the Dharmaguptaka school. Among the school's teachings was the reality of the present but not of the past and future. "
Maidu North America - Pacific Coast 9,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Maidu world 9,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Makah North America 2,000 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 81. "Makah... They inhabited Cape Flattery (American-Canadian border), near Vancouver Island... Numbering 2,000 in 1780, over 1,000 live at Neah Bay. "
Makah North America 1,000 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 81. "Makah... They inhabited Cape Flattery (American-Canadian border), near Vancouver Island... They gave up their territory to the United States government in 1855 but were granted a small reservation on the land itself in 1893. Numbering 2,000 in 1780, over 1,000 live at Neah Bay. "
Makah North America - Pacific Coast 2,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Ozette
Makah world 2,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Ozette
Makonde Tanzania - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Makua Mozambique - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Malagasy Madagascar 12,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 276, 278. "Malagasy: Location: Madagascar; Population: 12 million; Religion: Traditional beliefs; Christianity; Islam; animism "; Pg. 278: "Traditional religion in Madagascar is identical with traditional culture; ancestral civilization determines values and behavior. All Malgasy believe that there is one supreme being called Zanahary (God) or Andriamanitra (Rakotosoa). There is no dogma or clergy. Men who die 'leave to become God,' having powers with the rank they held in life,' and 'prayers are always asked for blessing with both Zanahary and the ancestors,' observes Harold D. Nelson in his Area Handbook for the Malagasy Republic. He goes on: 'about [half] of the population [of Madagascar] are Christians, divided almost evenly between Roman Catholics and Protestants; [there is a] small Muslim element; [the] rest [of the] population adheres to indigenous belifs and practices... "
Malagasy Lutheran Church Madagascar 1,200,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* Evangelical Lutheran Church in America web site; web page: "January 25, 1996 News Releases " (viewed 9 July 1999). Story: "More than 60 Million Lutherans Worldwide " [96-01-003-FI] "The most significant change was an increase in the membership of the Lutheran church in Madagascar. The Malagasy Lutheran Church recorded an increase [to 1,500,000] of 300,000 members compared with the previous year's figure. "
Malagasy Lutheran Church Madagascar 1,500,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* Evangelical Lutheran Church in America web site; web page: "January 25, 1996 News Releases " (viewed 9 July 1999). Story: "More than 60 Million Lutherans Worldwide " [96-01-003-FI] "The most significant change was an increase in the membership of the Lutheran church in Madagascar. The Malagasy Lutheran Church recorded an increase [to 1,500,000] of 300,000 members compared with the previous year's figure. "
Malagasy Lutheran Church Madagascar 1,500,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* Evangelical Lutheran Church in America web site; web page: "January 25, 1996 News Releases " (viewed 9 July 1999). Story: "More than 60 Million Lutherans Worldwide " [96-01-003-FI] List: "Lutheran Churches with more than 1/2 million members "; "Malagasy Lutheran Church (Madagascar) 1,500,000 "
Malaysia Baptist Convention Malaysia 7,000 - 80
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Mali Africa - West - - - - 1650 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 188. "Africa's Lost Cultures... Mali: While there are few written records that detail the ancient culture of Mali, it is believed that the empire was established by the leader Sundiata in the early 1200s. During its prosperous days the empire encompassed the areas of modern-day Mali, Mauritania, and Senegal. Mali contained the former empire of Ghana and was larger than all of Europe... Mali included the famed ancient city of Timbuktu... With a population of 50,000, Timbuktu during the Mali empire was a bustling center of commerce... The Mali people spoke Mande and Arabic, and they practiced both indigenous African and the Muslim religions... Byt he late 1400s, Timbuktu was taken over by the Songhai people, and by the mid-1600s, the remaining Mali territories were conquered... Mali culture was absorbed by the Mandinka kingdoms. "
Maliki Africa - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 431. "...four major schools of law (...madhahib) of Sunni Islam... <>Malikhites (named for Malik ibn Anas) are also rigorious but they recognize supplementary principles of Islamic law such as istislah, which takes into account the public welfare. Malikhites are most powerful in North Africa and Sudan. "
Maliki Egypt - - - - 1000 C.E. Nyrop, Richard F., et al. Area Handbook for Egypt (3rd Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975); pg. 120. "Religious creativity in Egypt reached its zenith during the two centuries of the Fatimid caliphate between 973 and 1171... Previously subordinated to Damascus and Baghdad, Egypt became for a brief time the center of Islamic scholarship and thinking... The school of jurisprudence founded by Al Shafii in the ninth century became dominant in Lower Egypt while an alternate school, the Malikite, established its hold over the peoples of Upper Egypt. "
Maliki Mauritania 1,800,000 99.00% - - 1987 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Islam:Sunni:Maliki:
Est. 1.8 million [total pop.] (1987). Virtually entire population Sunni Muslims and adhere to Maliki rite.
Maliki world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1465. "The Maliki school is traced to Malik ibn Anas of Medina (d. 795) who compiled a law-book, and whose ideas were developed by followers. It is now mainly found in North Africa. "
Maliki world - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 223. "Four Sunni schools have emerged... The Malikis school follows Malik ibn Anas (d. 795) who taught in Medina. It emphasizes the Interpretation of Muhammad's practice at Medina and is predominant in the North African states, as well as being widespread in Sudan, Nigeria and Central and West Africa. "
Malinke Africa 1,500,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 288-289. "Malinke: Location: Territory covering The Gambia, Senegal, Mali, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Cote d'Ivoire; Population: 1.5 million; Religion: Islam "; Pg. 289: "The majority of Malinke are Muslim and have adopted the tenets of Islam into their native beliefs, resulting in a wide range of syncretic variations. "
Malinke Guinea-Bissau 169,000 13.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 52. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Malinke world 700,000 - - 3
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 124, 128. "Malinke: Population: 700,000; Location: Senegal, Mali and Gabon; Languages: Malinke (Mandingo), French "; Pg. 128: "Although most of the Malinke practice Islam, traced of their original religion can also be found. These include ancient customs involving the worship of nature and ancestor spirits. "
Mambilla Baptist Convention Nigeria 14,667 - 194
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Manchus China 9,075,000 0.75% - - 1996 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 8-9. "Population: 1,210,000,000 (1996)... Ethnic Groups: Han Chinese, 92%; Zhuang, 1.33%; Mancu, .75%; Hui, .67%; Miao, .67%; Uygur, .58%; Yi, .57%; Tibetan, .42%; Mongol, .42% "; Pg. 82: "Among ethnic groups of northern China are the Manchu, who claim to be descended from the Manchurians who invaded China in the 17th century, and the Koreans, who live in an autonomous district in Jilin province, which borders North Korea. "
Manchus China 9,850,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 475. "Man (Manchus): Alternate Names: Jurchens, Manzhou, Manchus; Location: China; Population: 8.95 million; Language: Chinese, Manchu; Religion: Some shamanism "; "Dwelling mainly in northeast China, the Man, better known as the Manchus, have a long history... " "Religion: The traditional beliefs of the Manchus are rooted in Shamanism. According to the Manchus, a shaman means... The shaman's duty is to help women bear children, to cure illness, and to shield from misfortune... Another shaman is responsible for sacrificial offerings on religious festivals or when a major event occurs. Shamanism still exists in traditional Manchu villages, but has disappeared from cities a long time ago. "
Manchus China - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 45. "Today there are Buddhists among the Han Chinese, the Mongols, Tibetans, Manchus, Tu, Qiang and Dai... peoples. "
Mandan North America 3,600 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 46. "Mandan... They numbered 3,600 in 1780... "
Mandan North America 1,600 - - - 1837 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 46. "Mandan... They numbered 3,600 in 1780, 1,600 in 1837, before the epidemic... "
Mandan North America 705 - - - 1970 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 46. "Mandan... They numbered 3,600 in 1780, 1,600 in 1837, before the epidemic, and 705 in 1970, living on the Fort Berthold reservation around Lake Sakakawea, North Dakota, with the Hidatsa and the Arikara. "
Mandan North America - Northern Great Plains 3,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mandan world 3,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Mandean Africa 0 0.00% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Mandean Africa 0 0.00% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Mandean Africa 0 0.00% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Mandean Asia - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1213. "Some scholars believe that the Sabians still survive in the Mandaeans, a religious community living on the lower reaches of the Tigris and Euphrates... "
Mandean Asia 44,000 0.00% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Mandean Asia 45,000 0.00% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Mandean Asia 38,000 0.00% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Mandean Babylonia - - - - 260 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1721. "It has been established that Mani was familiar with the views of the Mandeans, a baptist sect still existing in Iraq, most probably originating from Palestine and possibly then living in southern Babylonia. "
Mandean Europe 0 0.00% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Mandean Europe 0 0.00% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "


Mandean, continued

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