Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Local Church, Europe

Local Church, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Local Church Latin America - - 300
units
- 1988 *LINK* Local Church official website. Source: J. Gordon Melton. The Encyclopedia of American Religions (FIFTH EDITION). Detroit, Michigan: Gale Research Inc. (1996) Membership: In 1988 the Local Church reported... congregations in Latin America (300)...
Local Church North America - - - - 1982 Long, Robert Emmet (ed.). Religious Cults in America (The Reference Shelf: Volume 66 Number 4), New York: The H. W. Wilson Co. (1994). [Orig. source: Article by J. Gordon Melton. From appendix A of The Cult Experience, Cleveland, OH: The Pilgrim Press (1982)]; pg. 95. "The Local Church has congregations in most cities across North America, but they have kept a low profile. Evangelism is done primarily by word of mouth and few items of their own publications go to nonmembers. Hence, most people rarely hear of their presence. Headquarters are at the Church in Anaheim, California. "
Local Church Oceania - - 25
units
2
countries
1988 *LINK* Local Church official website. Source: J. Gordon Melton. The Encyclopedia of American Religions (FIFTH EDITION). Detroit, Michigan: Gale Research Inc. (1996) Membership: In 1988 the Local Church reported... congregations in... Australia and New Zealand (25).
Local Church USA - - - - 1982 Melton, J. Gordon & Robert L. Moore. The Cult Experience: Responding to the New Religious Pluralism. New York: The Pilgrim Press (1984 [3rd printing; 1st printing 1982]); pg. 148. "The Local Church has congregations in most cities across North America, but they have kept a low profile. "
Local Church USA 13,050 - 150
units
- 1988 *LINK* Local Church official website. Source: J. Gordon Melton. The Encyclopedia of American Religions (FIFTH EDITION). Detroit, Michigan: Gale Research Inc. (1996) Membership: In 1988 the Local Church reported 13,050 members in 150 churches in the United States... There is no clergy in the traditional sense, but there were approximately 100 fulltime workers in the United States...
Local Church world 130,000 - - - 1985 *LINK* Living Stream Ministry, A Table of the Churches in the Lord's Recovery (LSM: 1985) 6. This publication lists the individual Local Church fellowships worldwide as of April, 1985. Today Witness Lee leads this movement of approximately 130,000
Local Church world 152,000 - 995
units
- 1988 *LINK* Local Church official website. Source: J. Gordon Melton. The Encyclopedia of American Religions (FIFTH EDITION). Detroit, Michigan: Gale Research Inc. (1996) Membership: In 1988 the Local Church reported 13,050 members in 150 churches in the United States and 1,305 members in 10 congregations in Canada. There is no clergy in the traditional sense, but there were approximately 100 fulltime workers in the United States and 15 in Canada. Worldwide membership was approximately 152,000 with congregations in Latin America (300), nine countries of Europe (35), four countries in Africa (25), eleven countries in east Asia (450), and Australia and New Zealand (25).
Local Church world 150,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) Membership is estimated at 150,000.
Lodge of Ur Europe - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Lodge of Ur "; web page: "The Lodge of Ur " (viewed 2 April 1999). "The Lodge of UR is a body of initiates in the Ancient Tradition of European Magic and Sorcery. We hold our rights to a knowledge rooted in the Ancestral soul of the Romans. We claim to be the last heirs of an EXISTING and UNBROKEN chain of magicians and sorcerers which has been present in Italy at least since the meeting between the Roman Legions and the invading tribes of the Kelts... The Lodge of UR is currenty active in Italy and several European countries. With the last developments of communication, comparison and parallels arose with other traditions... "
Lodge of Ur Italy - - - - 1940 *LINK* web site: "Lodge of Ur "; web page: "THE INVINCIBLE TRADITION: The Mysteries of the God Mithra " (viewed 2 April 1999); "(C) The Lodge of UR 1996 " "This form of magic emphasizes will-power and control over the elements, and the ritual itself was part of the doctrines taught in the italian 'Group of UR', a bond of initiates operating between 1900 and 1940 whose goal was to reform the western magical tradition of the Ancient Roman Mysteries. The Lodge of UR is heir of their practices and teachings leading to the magical realization of immortality and freedom, through pursuing the Path of the Unconquered God. "
Loko Africa - West - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Lokottaravadin Buddhism world - - - - -260 B.C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 129. "The Hinayana enumerates the traditions of 18 schools that developed out of the original community... Between 280 and 240 B.C.E., the Mahasanghika group divided into 6 schools: The Ekavyavaharikas; the Lokottaravadins, who split from them; the Gokulikas, and the Bahushrutiyas, Prajnaptivadins, and Chaitikas, who split from the Gokulikas. "
Lollards Europe - - - - 1300 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "LOLLARDS: the followers of John WYCLIFFE who were forerunners of the REFORMATION in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. "
Lollards United Kingdom: England - - - - 1300 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 473. "The sectarian movements led by John Wyclif in England and John Huss in Bohemia were associated with the spirit of rising nationalism. Wyclif's followers, the Lollards, were largely suppressed... "
Lollards United Kingdom: England - - - - 1420 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 436. "Lollards (Christian). Name given to the followers of John Wycliffe (1330-84), and later used for other English noncomformists. By 1420 Lollardy was primarily a lower class phenomenon which virtually disappeared after fifty years of persecution. "
London Missionary Society French Polynesia 20 - - - 1797 Douglas, Norman & Ngaire Douglas. Tonga: A Guide. Newstead, Brisbane, Australia: Albion Press (1989); pg. 33-34. "...ten members of the London Missionary Society, deposited on Tongatapu in 1797, a response to the enthusiasm for the South Seas generated by the publication of Cook's journals in England. Tonga was not the only part of the Pacific so blessed: Tahiti [French Polynesia] received twice the number. "
London Missionary Society Kiribati - - - - 1900 *LINK* Web site: "Kiribati "; web page: "Religion "; Originally by Jonathan Willis-Richards. This version edited by Mike Pearson. Viewed 31 May 1999. "Protestant evangelism was originally split between Hawaiian missionaries of the ABCFM and Samoan missionaries under the direction of the LMS [London Missionary Society]. The ABCFM more or less withdrew by default, formally handing over the sphere of influence to the LMS in the early part of the 20th century who established a European staffed presence from about 1900 onwards at Beru... "
London Missionary Society Samoa, Western 109,754 50.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 219,509; Note: other estimates as low as 162,000. Religions: Christian 99.7% (about one-half of pop. associated with the London Missionary Society; incl. Congregational, Roman Catholic, Methodist, Latter-Day Saint, Seventh-Day Adventist)
London Missionary Society Tonga 10 - - - 1797 Douglas, Norman & Ngaire Douglas. Tonga: A Guide. Newstead, Brisbane, Australia: Albion Press (1989); pg. 33-34. "Since Tonga was to become a virtually Methodist kingdom in the 19th century, it would be convenient if the Methodists had been the pioneers of Christianity. But they were not: that distinction belongs to ten members of the London Missionary Society, deposited on Tongatapu in 1797, a response to the enthusiasm for the South Seas generated by the publication of Cook's journals in England... "
London Missionary Society Tonga 5 - - - 1799 Douglas, Norman & Ngaire Douglas. Tonga: A Guide. Newstead, Brisbane, Australia: Albion Press (1989); pg. 34. "...ten members of the London Missionary Society, deposited on Tongatapu in 1797... Within a very short time two [missionaries] had deserted... In May 1979 three of them were clubbed to death... remaining five... By the time they escaped... the following year not one convert had been made. "
London Missionary Society Tonga 0 - - - 1800 Douglas, Norman & Ngaire Douglas. Tonga: A Guide. Newstead, Brisbane, Australia: Albion Press (1989); pg. 34. "...ten members of the London Missionary Society, deposited on Tongatapu in 1797... Their timing could hardly have been worse. Confusing the message with the medium, the Tongans showed far more interest in the artisan-missionaries' iron tools and trade skills than in their gospel... Within a very short time two [missionaries] had deserted. But their worst misfortune was the condition of Tongan society. This was a time of violent struggles, to which the missionaries unwittingly fell victims. In May 1979 three of them were clubbed to death, less for their beliefs than the fact that they had taken up residence with one of the warring chiefs. The remaining five had their house burnt and their property stolen. By the time they escaped on a Sydney-bound ship the following year not one convert had been made. "
Los Angeles International Church world 1,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* "Jim Bakker, Former Televangelist, To Remarry " in Weekly News Digest of Religion News Service (RNS), 14 Sept. 1998. Bakker served five years in prison and now is a missionary at the 1,000-member Los Angeles International Church, where he works with drug addicts and the homeless.
Los Angeles International Church world 1,000 - - - 1998 "News Briefs " in Christianity Today (Aug. 10, 1998); pg. 15. "Former PTL Ministries head Jim Bakker has joined the staff of the 1000-member Los Angeles International Church, also known as the Dream Center. "
Los Gatos Christian Church California 2,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; in San Jose, CA.
Loso Togo - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Lott Carey Baptist Foreign Mission Convention, USA USA 1,000,000 - 2,000
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Lou-mensen Netherlands - - - - 1968 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1828. "...messiahs have arisen... among... well-to-do and educated members of society. One of the most colorful of these was Lou, who was born Louwrens van Voorthuizen in north Holland... Lou... declared himself to be God in 1950, and drew around him a small and somewhat contentious body of followers, Lou-mensen, who were united essentially by their complete devotion to him... in the pamphlets which some of his middle-aged women votaries sold on the streets of Amsterdam, Lou derided... Lou died in 1968. For a time his followers continued as a group, but recent inquiries at their address have not been answered. "
Loveland Church California 2,700 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Fontana, CA; pastor Charles Singleton?.
Lower Lights Church Michigan - - 1
unit
- 1940 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Glenn Griffith Movement; pg. 227. "The Lower Lights Church was formed in 1940 as a single congregation (the Lower Lights Mission) in Ann Arbor, Michigan. "
Lower Lights Church USA - - - 1
country
1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Glenn Griffith Movement; pg. 227. "Lower Lights Church; Ann Arbor, MI [H.Q.]; The Lower Lights Church was formed in 1940 as a single congregation (the Lower Lights Mission) in Ann Arbor, Michigan. It subsequently branched out to neighboring communities and now cooperates with the Interdenominational Holiness Convention. Membership: Not reported. There are several congregations in Michigan and Ohio with several hundred members. "
Lower Lights Church world - - 1
unit
1
country
1940 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Glenn Griffith Movement; pg. 227. "The Lower Lights Church was formed in 1940 as a single congregation (the Lower Lights Mission) in Ann Arbor, Michigan. "
Lozi Zambia - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Luba Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Lucis Trust Australia - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Sydney Goodwill Unit of Service cooperates with World Goodwill... The Sydney Goodwill Unit of Service was founded in Australia in 1978. It was incorporated in August 1979 in order to market publications of the Lucis Press in Australia, particularly the books of Alice A. Bailey. "
Lucis Trust world - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Sydney Goodwill Unit of Service cooperates with World Goodwill, an international movement founded by Alice A. Bailey in 1932 to help mobilise goodwill and establish right human relations. The work of World Goodwill is based on the principles of brotherhood, human unity, sharing and co-operation, and on the fundamental rights and freedoms embodied in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. World Goodwill is a world service organisation practising the principle of non-discrimination in race, religion, ideology, and political and economic convictions... World Goodwill is an activity of the Lucis Trust, a registered charity established in 1922 in New York. The Lucis Trust provides worldwide financial support for the Arcane School, the Lucis Publishing Companies, World Goodwill, Triangles, Lucis Trust Libraries and Lucis Productions. The global activities of the Lucis Trust seek to foster right human relations through the power of loving service. "
Luhya Kenya - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Luhya Kenya 3,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 260. "Luhya: Location: Western Kenya; Population: 3 million; Language: Several Bantu dialects; Religion: Christianity (Catholicism, Protestantism); Islam; some indigenous beliefs "; "At the turn of the 20th century, Christianity was introduced to Luhyaland as it was to the rest of the country. An extensive spread of Christianity occurred during the colonial period. The overwhelming majority of Luhya people now consider themselves Christians. Both Catholicism and Protestantism are practiced. Among the Abawanga, Islam is also practiced. Despite conversion to Christianity, belief in spirits and witchcraft is still common, and it is not unusual to find people offering prayers in church and at the same time consulting witch doctors or medicine men for the same or different problems. "
Luiseno North America - Pacific Coast 4,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Luiseno world 4,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Lukumi world 1,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance Lukumi:
It is active in Brazil, where it is called Macumba. Macumba and other syncretistic Afro-Brasilian religions (Candomble, Umbanda, etc.) are believe to have over a million followers.
Lumbee USA 48,444 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Lumbee USA 48,444 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Lumber River Annual Conference of the Holiness Methodist Church world 500 - 7
units
- 1971 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 20th Century Holiness; pg. 220. "...Rowland, NC [H.Q.]... was organized in 1900 by members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at Union Chapel Church, Robeson County, North Carolina... Membership: Not reported. In the early 1970s there were 7 churches and slightly over 500 members. "
Lummi North America - Pacific Coast 1,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Nooksack, Samish
Lummi world 1,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Nooksack, Samish
Lumpa Church Zambia - - - - 1953 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1979. "Among the most dramatic of the anti-witchcraft movements has been the Lumpa Church of Alice Lenshina in Zambia. Alice Lenshina was a simple tribeswoman who belonged to the Church of Scotland Lubwa Mission in (then) Northern Rhodesia. In 1953, Lenshina claimed to have received visions, to have entertained angels, and to have met Jesus during a period of three nights and three days when she was 'dead'. "
Lumpa Church Zambia - - - - 1957 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1979. "...Lumpa Church of Alice Lenshina in Zambia... Initially she remained in the mission where a wise missionary sought to use, rather than suppress, her religious impulses. She testified against hatred, stealing, swearing, lying, adultery, and other sins, and she soon acquied a name as a prophetess among the natives. After a little time she began to baptize people, and called them to surrender to her their horns, charms and other implements of witchcraft. Her fame spread, and pilgrims came from as far away as Lake Tanganyika and Nyasaland. She taught the pilgrims songs, and after a time began to authorize teachers... her message was by no means out of harmony with Christian teachings - despite her dramatic visionary claims. "
Lumpa Church Zambia - - - - 1957 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1979. "But the accomodation of such a powerful teacher to mission Christianity proved difficult. In particular, Roman Catholic missions in the area were denuded of their following and Lenshina began to incur the hostility of the missionaries. Some declared that she had been given so spirit-possession when young, and others asserted that the new movement was an African nationalist or racist organization. There is, however, no evidence that Lenshina taught anything about an impending cataclysm which would overtake the government of the whites, even though -- in common with Christian Churches -- she had some teachings concerning the mellinnium. The central concern of the Lumpa Church was the elimination of witchcraft, but even this was misrepresented. Press reports by journalists, who understood little of African cultures, mistook witchcraft-elimination for witchcraft itself. "
Lumpa Church Zambia - - - - 1963 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1979. "Inevitably, a quick-growing movement of this kind met antagonism; her popular strength was great, and this emboldened her followers to defy the government on certain issues. She held court, rather in the traditional style of a chief; thus prophetism here, as elsewhere in Africa, was an avenue of social mobility. Nonetheless, district officers conceded that in Chinsali district where the Lumpa Church was strongest, morality had greatly improved. In 1963 the followers of Lenshina became involved in politics, despite her exhortations, and in the last days before complete independence a clash occurred between Lumpa churchmen and the authorities in which some hundreds of her followers were killed. Alice Lenshina, although perhaps not responsible for this conflict, was arrested and for some years the government prohibited the movement. "
Lunda Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Lungu South Africa - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Luo Africa 3,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 264-265. "Luo: Location: Western Province and Nyanza Province in Kenya; Tanzania; Population: Over 3 million "; "Christianity has had a major impact on Luo religious beliefs and practices. Today there are a variety of religious communities drawing on beliefs from indigenous practices and Christianity. The Anglican Church, known as the CPK, and the Roman Catholic Church are very significant among the Luo... Many people, however, do not draw sharp distinctions between religious practices which have European origins and those with African origin. "
Luo Kenya - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Luo Tanzania - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Luo world - - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; "Kenya, Tanzania "
Luri Iran 1,322,000 2.00% - - 1999 Lyle, Garry. Iran (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 9-10. "Population: 66,100,000... Ethnic Groups: Persian (51%), Azerbaijani (24%), Kurdish (7%), Luri (2%), Bakhtiari (2%), Baluchi (2%), Arab (3%), other (9%). "
Luri Iran - 2.00% - - 1999 Lyle, Garry. Iran (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 82. "The Zagros Mountains are the home of several tribal peoples... Chief among them are the Kurds (7%), the Luri, or lurs (2%), and the Bakhtiari (2%)... The Luri live in the central part of the range, in the region, in the region known as Luristan. "
Lutheran Africa 1,900,000 - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 114. "[Lutheran] present-day distribution by continents is: 60,400,000 in Europe; 8,900,000 in North America; 2,300,000 in Asia; 1,900,000 in South America; 1,900,000 in Africa; and 500,000 in Australasia. "
Lutheran Africa 6,200,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* [Orig. source: Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (1994 Update)] There are 6.2 million Lutherans in Africa, the place where the Lutheran Church is growing most rapidly today, and 4.6 million Lutherans in Asia.
Lutheran Africa 7,900,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* Evangelical Lutheran Church in America web site; web page: "January 25, 1996 News Releases " (viewed 9 July 1999). Story: "More than 60 Million Lutherans Worldwide " [96-01-003-FI] "Almost all of Africa's 7.9 million Lutherans are members of the [LWF] federation. "
Lutheran Africa 7,940,742 - - - 1995 *LINK* Evangelical Lutheran Church in America web site; web page: "January 25, 1996 News Releases " (viewed 9 July 1999). Story: "More than 60 Million Lutherans Worldwide " [96-01-003-FI] Table: "Lutheran World Federation 1995 Membership Figures Summary "
Lutheran Africa 8,600,000 - - - 1996 "Lutherans by the numbers " in Christian Century (March 4, 1998); pg. 228. "The total number of African Lutherans increased to 9 million, from just under 8.6 million in 1996. "
Lutheran Africa 9,000,000 - - - 1997 "Lutherans by the numbers " in Christian Century (March 4, 1998); pg. 228. "The total number of African Lutherans increased to 9 million, from just under 8.6 million in 1996. "
Lutheran Alabama 19,030 0.47% 86
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. This "Lutheran " figure is an aggregate from the 12 major American Lutheran religious bodies: Apostolic Lutheran Church of America; Church of the Lutheran Brethren of America; Church of the Lutheran Confession; Estonian Evangelical Lutheran Church; Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; Evangelical Lutheran Synod; Free Lutheran Congregations, Association of; Latvian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod; Lutheran Churches, American Association of; The Protestant Conference (Lutheran); Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod.
Lutheran Alabama - 0.60% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.


Lutheran, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.