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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Kurds, Iran

Kurds, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Kurds Iran 5,190,400 16.00% - - 1975 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised 1st American edition). [Original Sources: National Census of Population and Housing, November 1966, Tehran; Monthly Bulletin of Statistics, November 1971, UN, New York.]; pg. 96. "Table 1: The Kurdish Population in Iran "; 1975: Kurds in Iran: 5,514,800; % of Kurds in the Iranian Population: 16.
Kurds Iran 6,000,000 16.67% - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 211. "Iran... is a multinational empire... Out of an overall population of 36 million, there are roughly 13 million Turkish-speaking Azerbaijanis, 6 million Kurds, 2 million Arabs and a certain number of Baluchis and Turkomen. "
Kurds Iran 4,627,000 7.00% - - 1999 Lyle, Garry. Iran (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 9-10. "Population: 66,100,000... Ethnic Groups: Persian (51%), Azerbaijani (24%), Kurdish (7%), Luri (2%), Bakhtiari (2%), Baluchi (2%), Arab (3%), other (9%). "
Kurds Iran - 7.00% - - 1999 Lyle, Garry. Iran (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 82. "The Zagros Mountains are the home of several tribal peoples... Chief among them are the Kurds (7%), the Luri, or lurs (2%), and the Bakhtiari (2%)... The Kurds... live in the northern part of the mountain range... "
Kurds Iran: Khorassan 400,000 - - - 1975 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised 1st American edition). [Original Sources: National Census of Population and Housing, November 1966, Tehran; Monthly Bulletin of Statistics, November 1971, UN, New York.]; pg. 96. "On the other hand, there is a tight community of 400,000 Kurds in the Province of Khorassan, notably in Gutshan and Dorgaz. "
Kurds Iran: Kurdistan 4,809,800 87.00% - - 1975 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised 1st American edition). [Original Sources: National Census of Population and Housing, November 1966, Tehran; Monthly Bulletin of Statistics, November 1971, UN, New York.]; pg. 96. "Table 1: The Kurdish Population in Iran "; 1975: Kurdistan in Iran: 5,514,800; Kurds in Iran: 5,514,800; % of Kurds in the Iranian Population: 16.; "Of the people living in Iranian Kurdistan, 12.8% are Azerbaijanis (470,000) and Persians (235,000). On the other hand, there is a tight community of 400,000 Kurds in the Province of Khorassan, notably in Gutshan and Dorgaz. "
Kurds Iraq 3,000,000 28.00% - - 1975 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 143. "The government calculated that the overall population of Iraq grew from 8,261,000 registered in the 1965 census to 11,124,000 in 1975. With its population of 2,800,000, Kurdistan accounts for 26.7%, a slightly smaller proportion than the 27.2% in 1957. For the total number of Kurds living in the Republic, one must subtract from this figure of 2,800,000 the 250,000 non-Kurdish inhabitants of Kurdistan and add the 300,000 Kurds who live in the capital [Baghdad] itself, the 50,000 Kurds who live in the city of Mosul and the approximately 100,000 Kurds living elsewhere in southern Iraq. This brings the total number of Kurds in the Republic up to 3 million for 1975, some 28% of the population as a whole. "
Kurds Iraq 3,620,000 20.00% - - 1990 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Iraq ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1990); pg. 40. "Iraq's population of 18.1 million people includes several ethnic groups. Arabs make up about 75% of the total, and Kurds--the largest non-Arab group--compose about 20%. "
Kurds Iraq 3,400,000 17.00% - - 1997 Russell, Malcom B. The Middle East and South Asia 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 104. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Kurds Iraq 4,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Kurdistan (Iraq) " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "In Iraq, there are 4 million Kurds, who run their own administration. "
Kurds Iraq: Baghdad 300,000 10.71% - - 1975 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 143. "...300,000 Kurds who live in the capital [Baghdad] itself, the 50,000 Kurds who live in the city of Mosul... for 1975... In 1974 Baghdad had 2,800,000 inhabitants and Mosul 500,000. "
Kurds Iraq: Kurdistan 2,550,000 91.07% - - 1975 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 143. "The government calculated that the overall population of Iraq grew from 8,261,000 registered in the 1965 census to 11,124,000 in 1975. With its population of 2,800,000, Kurdistan accounts for 26.7%, a slightly smaller proportion than the 27.2% in 1957. For the total number of Kurds living in the Republic, one must subtract from this figure of 2,800,000 the 250,000 non-Kurdish inhabitants of Kurdistan... "
Kurds Iraq: Mosul 50,000 10.00% - - 1975 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 143. "...300,000 Kurds who live in the capital [Baghdad] itself, the 50,000 Kurds who live in the city of Mosul... for 1975... In 1974 Baghdad had 2,800,000 inhabitants and Mosul 500,000. "
Kurds Kazakhstan 12,313 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 203. "In Kazakhstan, the Kurds live in small communities at Tchimkent, in Jamboul and around Alma Ata. According to the 1970 Census, there were 12,313 of them, and a further 7,974 in the Kirghiz SSR, mainly in Oche. "
Kurds Kyrgyzstan 7,974 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 203. "In Kazakhstan, the Kurds live in small communities at Tchimkent, in Jamboul and around Alma Ata. According to the 1970 Census, there were 12,313 of them, and a further 7,974 in the Kirghiz SSR, mainly in Oche. "
Kurds Middle East 23,000,000 - - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. xii. "...approximately 23 million Kurds... Middle East... "
Kurds Soviet Union 278,463 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 204. Table: "The Kurdish Population in the USSR "; "Armenia: 37,486; Azerbaijan: 150,000 [estimate, lower limit]; Georgia: 20,690 [previous page in text says 20,960]; Kazakhstan: 12,313; Kirghiz: 7,974; Turkoman: 50,000 [estimate, lower limit]; Total: 278,463 "
Kurds Soviet Union - - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 202. "Although there are no Kurdish territories in the USSR, there is a Kurdish community--or rather several compact Kurdish colonies similar to those of Turkish Anatolia--scattered throughout the Transcaucasian and Central Asian Republics, in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kirghiz and the Turkoman SSR. "
Kurds Syria 825,000 11.00% - - 1976 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 194. "...no official statistics on... Kurds in Syria... One is reduced to making estimates region by region, drawing on as wide a range of sources... as possible. On this basis, one can say that in 1976 there were something like 825,000 Kurds living in [Syria], amounting to 11% of the pop. of 7.5 million... regional distrib... as follows: Kurd-Dagh: 290,00; Jebel Samaan and Azaz: 30,000; Ain al-Arab: 60,000; Northern Jezireh: 360,000; Southern Jezireh: 10,000; Aleppo: 10,000; Damascus: 30,000; Other towns or regions: 30,000 "
Kurds Turkey 8,500,000 23.80% - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 38-39. "According to the last general census, in 1970, the population of Kurdistan in Turkey numbered 7,557,000 inhabitants of whom 6,200,000 are Kurds, about 82% of the total... Furthermore, any estimate of the number of Kurds in Turkey must also take into account the important concentrations of Kurds scattered in colonies throughout Anatolia (Cihanbeyli, Haymana, Kurtoghe, Tokat, Sankiri, etc.), and the hundreds of thousands of Kurdish emigrant workers in the country's main industrial centers. In Istanbul alone there are over half a million of them. The Kurdish community living away from Kurdistan numbered from two to two and a half million people in 1970. In short, there were about 8.5 million Kurdish speakers in 1970, which represents 23.8% of the population of... Turkey... "
Kurds Turkey 12,000,000 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 39. "This figure of 8.5 million, which was reached on the basis of the 1970 census figures, is probably not very accurate. There are several conflicting estimates of the real number of Kurdish people in Turkey, ranging from 8 to 12 million. The Turkish authorities prefer to minimize the numbers, whilst some nationalist groups tend to exaggerate them. "
Kurds Turkey 10,000,000 - - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. xii. "In Turkey the growing disaffection of over 10 million Kurds threaten a destructive inter-communal conflict... "
Kurds Turkey: Istanbul 500,000 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 38-39. "In Istanbul alone there are over half a million of them [Kurds, 1970 general census]. "
Kurds Turkey: Kurdistan 7,557,000 82.00% - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 38-39. "According to the last general census, in 1970, the population of Kurdistan in Turkey numbered 7,557,000 inhabitants of whom 6,200,000 are Kurds, about 82% of the total. "
Kurds Turkmenistan 22,000 - - - 1926 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 203. "A similarly peculiar situation prevails in the Turkoman SSR, another Turkish and Muslim Soviet Republic. The 1926 Census mentions some 22,000 Kurds living there. "
Kurds Turkmenistan 20,000 - - - 1956 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 203. "A similarly peculiar situation prevails in the Turkoman SSR, another Turkish and Muslim Soviet Republic. The 1926 Census mentions some 22,000 Kurds living there. Thirty years later the official estimate was 20,000. "
Kurds Turkmenistan 2,933 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 203. "In 1970, the official figure [of Kurds living in Turkoman SSR] had fallen to 2,933. The Kurds had not been subjected to any deportations during this period and one can hardly be expected to believe that 'voluntary assimilation and intermingling' is the sole explanation. It would therefore seem very likely that the Turkoman authorities... Kurds were being systematically put down as Turkoman in the official registers. "
Kurds Turkmenistan 50,000 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 203. "My Kurdish sources estimate the population of the Kurdish-speaking colony in the Turkoman SSR at about 50,000, implanted in Achkhabad, the capital, in the towships of Baguire and Bayram Ali and in various other districts such as Ciok-Tepe, Kakhka, Kara-Kala, Tejen, etc. "
Kurds world 28,000,000 - - 5
countries
1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 286-287. "Kurds: A people speaking Kurdish who live in an area described as Kurdistan, which straddles modern Turkey, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and Soviet Transcaucasia... Estimates of the number of Kurds varies between 14 and 28 million. Most Kurds are Sunni Muslims and speak Kurdish... "
Kurds world 25,000,000 - - 5
countries
1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 188. "A nation is a community that shares a common culture, territory, and language. Its people feel bonded to one another because they believe they share a common descent or racial origin, a religion, a common future, or a common enemy. We often think of nations as countries with a government, but that is not always so. For example, 25 million Kurds are torn amont Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Azerbaijan. "
Kurds world 30,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Kurdistan (Iraq) " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "A total population of the Kurds is 30 million people. In Iraq, there are 4 million Kurds... "
Kurozumikyo Japan - - - - 1921 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 112-113. "Kyoha Shinto: 'Sect Shinto'... In 1921... the official association of Shinto sects had 13 groups... included revelatory 'new' religious movements... such as Tenrikyo, Kurozumi-kyo and Konko-kyo... "
Kurozumikyo Japan 750,000 - - - 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969); pg. 293. "During the Meiji period the Kurozumi sect grew greatly, but it now has a mere 750,000 members, and its best days have apparently passed. "
Kurozumikyo Japan 218,240 0.19% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Shinto new religion (year of origin: 1814). Listed as "Kurozumi-kyo ".
Kurozumikyo Japan - - - - 1996 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 111. "Kurozumi-kyo: A religious movement founded in the early nineteenth century by Kurozumi, Munetada (1780-1850). The group had a precarious existence as a new religion, but Kurozumi's successors supported early Meiji attempts to create a state religion, the 'great teaching' (taikyo) and the movement was granted official status in 1876 as 'Shinto kurozumi-ha'... Though an independnet religion with distinctive teachings more akin to those of the new religions than jija shinto, Kurozumi-kyo preserves a 'Shinto' identity... "
Kurozumikyo Japan - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 136-137. "Sect Shinto consists of a wide range of sects with very different philosophies and practices. 13 are officially recognized... Kurozumi Kyo is based on the self-healing experiences of Kurozumi Munetada (1780-1850)... "
Kurozumikyo world 250,000 - - - 1993 Rausch, David A. & Carl Hermann Voss. World Religions: Our Quest for Meaning; Trinity Press International: Valley Forge, PA (1993); pg. 111-112. "Today, with a membership of almost 250,000, the Kurozumikyo movement emphasizes devotion, moral integrity, and faith healing. "
Kush Africa - - - - 200 C.E. Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 184. "Africa's Lost Cultures... Kush: The ancient kingdom of Kush centered on a city called Napata in what is now Sudan. Although not much is known about the population or culture of the Kush, historians believe they were a wealthy and powerful people as far back as the ninth century B.C. The Kush civilization thrived for almost 1,000 years... By the eighth century B.C., Kushite armies conquered most of Egypt, and for almost 100 years dominated much of the African continent. But during the seventh century B.C., the powerful Assyrians invaded their territory, forcing the Kush to retreat up the Nile River and resettle inthe ancient city of Meroe. From 500 B.C. to A.D. 200 the Kushites controlled a wide empir that was known throughout Africa for its iron tools and weapons. "
Kusha Japan - - - - 658 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996). Chapter: Buddhism; pg. 122. "By the Nara period (710-94), six schools had been brought over from China: Sanron and Jojitsu (both established in 624), Hosso (654), Kusha (658), Kegon (736), and Ritsu (754); Jojitsu, Kusha, and Ritsu were Hinayana, the other three Mahayana. Of the six, only Hosso, Kegon, and Ritsu have survived in modern Japan, and these have only historical significance and slight membership. "
Kusha Japan - - - - 784 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 524. "The six Nara Buddhist schools. Six scholarly disciplines were pursuied by a small number of monks at designated home temples in Nara. They were extensions of Chinese scholarship... Kusha (Chin.: Chu-she; Skt.: Abhidharmakosa) school. A Hinayana tradition of the Sarvastivada branch committed to a 'realist' analysis of phenomena into their component elements (dharmas)... Jojitsu... Sanron... Hosso... Kegon... Ritsu... "
Kutchin North America 1,200 - - - 1936 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 86. "Kutchin... Their region includes the upper Yukon valley, the Yukon territory, and to the far east, the mouth of the MacKenzie River... They numbered 1,200 in 1936. "
Kuy Asia - Southeast 100,000 - - - 1984 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 539-540. Chapter about Mountain Mon-Khmer Groups: "The Kui (Kuoy, Soai) number more than 100,000 in east-central Thailand, northeast Cambodia, and Laos. "; Pg. 540: The people of the hill tribes continue the traditional beliefs and practices of their ancestors... " [Year: 1984, similar to accompanying text this section?]
Kuy Asia - Southeast 300,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 539-540, 544. "Between 150,000 and 200,000 Kuy live in north central Cambodia in the provinces of Kampong Thom, Preah Vihear, and Stung Trung and in neighboring Thailand. Maybe half that number live in Cambodia-proper. "; Pg. 544: "Most Kuy living in Cambodia have been assimiliated into Cambodian culture, as Kuy living in Thailand have been incorporated into Thai society. Most Kuy practice wet rice cultivation, have converted to Buddhism, and speak both the national language and their tribal language. "
Kwaiailk North America - Pacific Coast 216 - - - 1855 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kwaiailk world 216 - - - 1855 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kwakiutl North America 4,500 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 79. "Kwakiutl... They lived on the banks of Queen Charlotte Strait and its inlets... Numbering about 4,500 in 1780, there are more than 3,500 currently living on and off reservations. "
Kwakiutl North America 3,500 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 79. "Kwakiutl... They lived on the banks of Queen Charlotte Strait and its inlets... Numbering about 4,500 in 1780, there are more than 3,500 currently living on and off reservations. "
Kwakwa Cote d'Ivoire - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Kwalhioqua North America - Pacific Coast 200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kwalhioqua world 200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
L'Eglise chretienne universelle France - - 5,000
units
- 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1828. "A [messianic] figure about whom even less is generally known is Georges Roux, the Christ of Montfavet, near Avignon in France. Roux was a postmaster who had practised as a faith healer for some time when, in the early 1950s, he announced that he was Christ. To read his works in simplicity of heart, it is claimed, is to accept his mission as the reappearing Christ. Roux's followers, whose churches take the name L'Eglise chretienne universelle, are reputed to number more than 5,000, principally in Paris and southern France. "
L'Eglise de Dieu en Christ Mennonite Haiti 444 - 6
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " HAITI... L'Eglise de Dieu en Christ Mennonite; Members: 444; Congregations: 6
L'Eglise Evangelique Mennonite du Burkina Faso Burkina Faso 80 - 5
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Africa: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " "BURKINA FASO: L'Eglise Evangelique Mennonite du Burkina Faso?Members: 80; Congregations: 5 "
La Iglesia Evangelica Anabautista de Bolivia Bolivia 222 - 6
units
- 1994 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " BOLIVIA... La Iglesia Evangelica Anabautista de Bolivia... Members (1994): 222; Congregations: 6
Labadists Netherlands 55 - - - 1670 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 425. "Labadists: A pietistic sect of the 17th and 18th centuries, founded by Jean de Labadie, a French ex-Jesuit... founded a separate sect in Middleburg, Holland... he and his 55 followers migrated to Hereford, in Westphalia, 1670. "
Labadists world 400 - - - 1700 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 425. "Labadists: A pietistic sect of the 17th and 18th centuries, founded by Jean de Labadie, a French ex-Jesuit... The high tide of their prosperity was reached in Wiewert, West Friesland, with about 400 members... " [year is approx.]
Lacandon Maya Latin America - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1773. "In the forests of the Peten a few very primitive families of Lacandon Maya still survive. However the Katun wheel of fate suggests that in the near future their wanderings will end. It is to be hoped that they will be absorbed into the modern world in happiness. "
Lacandon Maya world 160 - - - 1959 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 183. "One strange group of Indians, living near the ruins of Palenque in the jungles of Chiapas, are the remnants of an old Maya tribe, the Lacandones. These Indians have assiduously avoided outside influences and have tried to keep up the old way of life, so they afford us a dramatic look into the Mayan past... As of 1959 their numbers had dwindled to 160, and they seemed doomed to extinction. "
Lahoris world - - - - 1914 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 16. "...Ahmadiyya. In 1914 a split, due as much to personal antagonisms as doctrinal differences, evolved between the Qadiyani and Lahori branches of the movement, and persists to the present day. "
Lahoris world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 437. "The Ahmadiyas split into two secs: the more radical Qadiyanis (named for Ahmad's birthplace in the Punjab), now based in Pakistan, and the Lahoris, who acknowledge Ahmad as a Muslim reformer rather than a prophet? "
Lak Russia: Dagestan 118,000 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 294-295. Table with 2 columns: "Ethnic Group " [not religious groups] & "Population "; Pg. 295: "Aside from the Mountain Jews and the Christian Cossacks, the peoples of Dagestan are almost exclusively Muslim. "
Lake Avenue Congregational California 2,686 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; in Pasadena, CA; pastor Gordon Kirk.
Lake Erie Yearling Meeting Michigan - - 1
unit
- 1981 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 321. "Lake Erie Yearling Meeting... Congregations... one in Ann Arbor, Michigan. "
Lake Erie Yearling Meeting USA 1,061 - 23
units
- 1981 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Quakers (Friends); pg. 321. "Lake Erie Yearling Meeting... Kent, OH [H.Q.]... began in 1939 as the Association of Friends Meetings. In 1963 it became a yearly meeting and assumed its present structure in 1969. Congregations are located in Pennsylvania and Ohio with one in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Most meetings are in urban areas or college towns... While independent, it has undertaken ecumenical efforts with a wide variety of Friends' groups. It carries on work in Korea with the Ohio Yearly Meeting of the Conservative Friends. Membership: In 1981 the Meeting had 1,061 members in 23 congregations and worship groups. "
Lake Erie Yearling Meeting world 1,061 - 23
units
1
country
1981 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 321. "In 1981 the Meeting had 1,061 members in 23 congregations and worship groups. "


Lake Erie Yearling Meeting, continued

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