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Ku Klux Klan, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Ku Klux Klan South Carolina - - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 48-50. "..the Klan... has fragmented into a rabble of feuding groups... Klan groups are known to exist in... North Carolina, South Carolina, and New York. "
Ku Klux Klan South Carolina - - 4
units
- 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Klan groups.
Ku Klux Klan South Carolina - - 5
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Ku Klux Klan Tennessee - - - - 1845 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 27. "The Ku Klux Klan was the first major, violence-prone group in the United States to be organized according to racism in general and a belief in white supremacy in particular. It began in Tennessee shortly after the Civil War. A small group of discouraged and defeated Confederate soldiers banded together under the leadership of a former Confederate general, Nathan Bedford Forrest. They sought to maintain the practices of the old South--most notably the enslavement of African Americans--in the face of changes brought about by intruding Northerners and freed slaves. While at first these often unemployed ex-soldiers engaged largely in prankish stunts, before long the organization expaned and involved itself in increasingly violent and sinister activities... "
Ku Klux Klan Tennessee 6 - - - 1845 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 17. "Historians believe that six ex-Confederate soldiers started the Ku Klux Klan. Dressing up in bedsheets and masks, they rode after dark through the town of Pulaski, Tennessee, frightening the black ex-slaves. "
Ku Klux Klan Tennessee 6 - 1
unit
1
country
1866 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 40. "It all began innocently enough in 1866, when six bored Confederate veterans gathered around a fireplace on Christmas Eve in Pulaski, Tennessee. For fun and adventure, they formed what began as a social club. After some brainstorming, the group settled on the name Ku Klux Klan--after the Greek word kuklox, which means circle or band. "
Ku Klux Klan Tennessee - - 2
units
- 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Klan groups.
Ku Klux Klan Tennessee - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Ku Klux Klan Texas - - - - 1981 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 32-33. "Among the headline-making cases was the Klan's intimidation of Vietnamese refugees in Texas who had taken up shrimp fishing in Galveston Bay... Determined to drive the Vietnamese Americans from the area, the white fishermen contacted the Klan for assistance. The Texas Klan eagerly became involved, regarding the fishing dispute as part of a larger international conspiracy among people of color to wrench control of the nation from the white majority... Over the following weeks the Klan began a drive to force the immigrants out. "
Ku Klux Klan Texas - - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 48-50. "..the Klan... has fragmented into a rabble of feuding groups... Klan groups are known to exist in... California, Texas, Georgia... "
Ku Klux Klan Texas - - 6
units
- 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Klan groups.
Ku Klux Klan Texas - - 5
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Ku Klux Klan USA - - - - 1915 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 28. "Several decades later, in 1915, the racist organization blossomed for a second time as political and economic conditions became ideal for its return... The Klan also gained a firm foundation in parts of the North and West where industrial changes, as well as the increased migration of African Americans from the South, had begun to make some less affluent whites increasingly insecure about their jobs... Besides its disdain and frequent persecution of African Americans, Jews, Catholics, and foreigners, the Klan also punished white Protestant women it deemed immoral... "
Ku Klux Klan USA 1,200,000 - - - 1922 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 42-44. "...a Klan leader consulted two publicists in the early 1920s when membership was down. They advised that
The Klan needed somebody else to hate. . . . It was no longer enough just to target blacks ad appeal to people's patriotism. The Klan needed other scapegoats. . . . On the advice of [the publicists], the Klan declared itself '100 percent American, 100 percent Christian and 100 percent Protestant.'
What they really mean was that the Klan was to become staunchly anti-black, anti-Jewish, anti-Catholic, [anti-Mormon,] as well as anti-Asian, anti-immigrant, anti-bootlegger, anti-dope, and anti-scandalous sexual behavior. The strategy worked. By 1921, more than 100,000 people had joined... and by 1922, the Klan boasted 1.2 million members. 'No longer was the Klan a regional organization confined to the South--it had becom e a national phenomenon' "
Ku Klux Klan USA 4,500,000 - - - 1923 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. . "The Ku Klux Klan was revived in 1915 and began to flourish after the war. As in Reconstruction days, men dressed in white robes and hoods, conducted weird rituals, burned crosses, held parades and demonstrations, organized boycotts, and harassed and attacked blacks. In the 20s, however, the socioeconomic level of the membership was somewhat higher and the organization more respectable. By 1923 there were some 4.5 million Klansmen throughout the country, and they controlled the legislatures of Texas, Oklahoma, Indiana, and Oregon. The Klan's targets expanded to include Jews, Catholics, immigrants, liberals, intellectuals, & advocates of the new urban morality... Revelations about immoral and illegal activities by Klan leaders & a national revulsion against several acts of Klan violence prompted the organization's rapid decline. It was still a factor in the 1928 presidential election, however, when Alfred E. Smith, the first Catholic to head a major party ticket, went down to defeat. "
Ku Klux Klan USA 6,000,000 - - - 1925 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 44. "At its peak in 1925, membership approached six million people, and the constituency was strong enough to vote some Klansmen into public office. But ineffective Klan public officials, scandals, growing opposition to Klan tactics, and the Depression soon whittled down memberships. "
Ku Klux Klan USA 3,000,000 - - - 1925 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 82. "The post-World War I era was particularly fertile ground for the growth of white racist groups. The early 1920s witnessed the growth of the Ku Klux Klan, which at its height had as many as 3 million members that included many doctors, lawyers, judges, and university professors. As a young man, future President Harry Truman almost joined the Klan, and future Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black and senator Robert F. Byrd actually did join. "
Ku Klux Klan USA 4,000,000 3.54% - - 1929 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 18-19. "People joined by the thousands. Most of the new members were from the Midwest. By the late 1920s, Klan officials claimed that 4 million of America's 113 million citizens had joined their organization. "
Ku Klux Klan USA - 0.00% - - 1945 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 31. "In the 1930s the Klan was once again active only in the South, and by the mid-1940s it dissolved for the second time. "
Ku Klux Klan USA - - - - 1946 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 31. "In 1946 a Georgia physician named Samuel Green breathed new life into the organization. He traveled throughout the country praising white superiority and sponsoring rallies. When he died just three years later the Klan continued, but the organization splintered into separate and often competing Klan groups. Yet the various Klan chapters were still united in their desire for racial purity and their frequent reliance on violence to enforce their wishes. "
Ku Klux Klan USA 42,000 - - - 1965 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 22. "Klan membership rose to 42,000 in 1965. "
Ku Klux Klan USA 50,000 - - - 1969 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 44-46. "...Klan membership didn't mushroom again until the civil rights movement in the 1950s. By the late 1950s, the major Klan network was rooted in nine Southern states, and almost two dozen smaller Klan units competed with them, sparking violence... By the end of the 1960s, there were some fifty thousand members united to fight desegregation. "
Ku Klux Klan USA 1,500 - - - 1974 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 22. "Public disapproval, strong police enforcement, prosecution by the U.S. Justice Department, and juries who were not afraid to convict Klan members put the Klan out of business. By 1974 membership was down to 1,500. "
Ku Klux Klan USA 10,000 - - - 1985 Able, Deborah. Hate Groups (series: "Issues in Focus "). Springfield, N.J.: Enslow Publishers, Inc. (1995); pg. 44. "By the 1980s, there were three major branches of the organization. In spite of its growing membership (estimated at 10,000 at its peak in the mid-1980s), many people thought that the Ku Klux Klan no longer existed. "
Ku Klux Klan USA 5,000 - - - 1988 Feldman, Egal. Dual Destinies: The Jewish Encounter with Protestant America; Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press (1990); pg. 244. Besides a variety ofKu Klux Klan organizations, which by 1988 claimed a combined membership of about 5,000, a host of other groups have sprung to life in recent years. "
Ku Klux Klan USA - - - - 1990 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 36. "While trying to remain viable despite substantial monetary reverses, the Klan has also suffered from a steady decline in membership, a decline that was only slowed in 1990. Although organized hate may be flourishing, the Klan has lost numerous potential members to other, more militant organizations. A 1991 survey prepared by Klanwatch, a Klan monitoring group, indicated: 'In recent years there has been a falling off in the number of Klan-type groups, as younger people rejected the robes and ritual sin favor of paramilitary type groups... The newer groups with 'glamour leaders' (also) attract (more) media attention.' Yet few would characterize the Ku Klux Klan as defunct. In commenting on its effectiveness in the late 198s, then U.S. Senator Michael Figures notes that the Klan still remains 'a force to be watched and not taken for granted.' "
Ku Klux Klan USA 6,500 - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 46-48. "Today the Ku Klux Klan has a membership of a meager 5,000 - 6,500, a slump of between 15% and 25% since 1984 and the lowest membership in 15 years... Many racists who might otherwise be Klan members have traded in their white robes for military-like uniforms and camouflage clothing and have joined neo-Nazi groups and other paramilitary groups. "
Ku Klux Klan USA - - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 48. "Today's Ku Klux Klan is in transition. There isn't even a single Klan anymore; it has fragmented into a rabble of feuding groups, 'an alphabet soup overstocked with K's, says journalist James Coates in his book, Armed and Dangerous. There are more than a dozen splinter organizations. The major ones are as follows: The United Klans of America... The Invisible Empire, Knights of the Ku Klux Klan... The Knights of the Ku Klux Klan has two factions... In addition, Klan groups are known to exist in Florida, Ohio, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, California, Texas, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and New York. "
Ku Klux Klan USA - - 100
units
- 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Klan groups.
Ku Klux Klan USA 5,000 - - - 1994 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 22. "Although its nationwide membership climbed to 5,000 members during the 1980s and 1990s, the Klan has never regained its former status. "
Ku Klux Klan USA - - 110
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 77. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: [Key to map] Ku Klux Klan: 110; Neo-Nazi: 180; Racist Skinhead: 39; Christian Identity: 32; Black Separatist: 48; Neo-Confederate; Other: 105 [Source: Southern Poverty Law Center.]
Ku Klux Klan USA - Midwest - - - - 1929 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 19-20. "The midwestern Klan members campaigned against bootleggers, speakeasies, immoral books and movies, and nightclubs. But the Klan targeted even more. According to Patsy Sims, author of The Klan, their victims included 'anyone, anywhere, the Klan didn't like, and its dislikes were many: Negroes, Jews, Catholics, Orientals, Mormons, immigrants...' In the late 1920s, newspapers began to publish stories about the Klan's role in political corruption and bribery, and about the questionable behavior of one of its leaders. This conflicted with the Klan's claim that it supported law and order and Christian morality. Thousands of Americans, disgusted by the Klan and the behavior of its members, cancelled their memberships. "
Ku Klux Klan USA - South - - - 1
country
1866 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 20. "In 1866, just after the [Civil] war, a secret club named themselves the Ku Klux Klan and vowed to assert what they claimed was the superiority of the Southern white man. "
Ku Klux Klan USA - South - - - - 1867 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 40-41. "The secret hooded order soon caught the imaginatino of those neighbors in surrounding towns... By 1867, there were enough separate groups to hold a convention, which declared that the fundamental goal of the Klan was the maintenance of the supremacy of the white race in this country. Then called the Invisible Empire of the South... "
Ku Klux Klan USA - South - - - - 1868 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 42. "A Congressional investigation in 1866 reported that in just three weeks before election day, 2,000 people had been murdered or floggedin Louisiana; 72 murdered and 126 flogged in Georgia; 18 murdered and 315 flogged in North Carolina; and 109 killed in Alabama. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center:
Between 1889 and 1841, 3,811 black people were lynched for 'crimes' such as threatening to sue a white man, attempting to register to vote, joining labor unions, being 'disrespectful' to a white man, looking at a white woman, or for no reason at all.
Ku Klux Klan USA - South - - - - 1875 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 27. "Since most Klan members wore robes and hoods during Klan activities to conceil their identities, the organization became known as the Invisible Empire. By the late 1860s, these nameless men were actively engaged in their own campaign of brutality and terror throughout the South and bording states... United by their shared racist ideals and the desire to preserve the old South... To stem the increasing frequency of the group's crimes in 1871, Congress passed legislation authorizing the president to use federal troops against the Klan. Klansmen blamed non-Klansmen for the murders and other atrocities attributed to them. Meanwhile, membership declined sharply. By the mid-1870s, only remnants of the first Ku Klux Klan remained. "
Ku Klux Klan USA - South - - - - 1877 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 17. "Membership in the Klan grew and their activists became more violent. Robed and hooded Klan members shot pu houses and dragged people from their beds to tar-and-feather or beat them. Some victims were killed. When federal troops withdrew from the South in 1877, white Southerners regained control over their states' governments. Their anger and frustration lessened. Membership in the Klan declined as a result. But the Klan did not die. Over the past 130 years, in response to changes in society, the Klan has periodically reappeared. "
Ku Klux Klan USA - South - - - - 1935 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 31. "Yet after a time, public ridicule of the Klan's overzealous and often sadistic methods as well as internal dissensino among members chipped away at the organization's solidarity. In the 1930s the Klan was once again active only in the South... "
Ku Klux Klan Utah - - - - 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Klan groups.
Ku Klux Klan Vermont - - 1
unit
- 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Klan groups.
Ku Klux Klan Virginia - - 5
units
- 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Klan groups.
Ku Klux Klan Virginia - - 7
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Ku Klux Klan Washington - - 1
unit
- 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Klan groups.
Ku Klux Klan Washington - - 2
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Ku Klux Klan West Virginia - - 2
units
- 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Klan groups.
Ku Klux Klan Wisconsin - - 2
units
- 1992 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994). [Source: Klanwatch]; pg. 30. Map: "White Supremacist Groups in the U.S. in 1992 " Klan groups.
Ku Klux Klan Wisconsin - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Ku Klux Klan world 6 - 1
unit
1
country
1866 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 40. "It all began innocently enough in 1866, when six bored Confederate veterans gathered... in Pulaski, Tennessee. For fun and adventure, they formed what began as a social club. After some brainstorming, the group settled on the name Ku Klux Klan... "
Ku Klux Klan world 5,000,000 - - 1
country
1925 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993). [Original source: Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, Hate Groups in America: A Record of Bigotry and Violence (New York: Anti-Defamation League, 1988, pg. 78.]; pg. 31. "The 1920s was an important Klan growth period, as its nationwide membership expanded to between 4 and 5 million individuals. "
Ku Klux Klan world 55,000 - - 1
country
1967 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993). [Original source: Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, Hate Groups in America: A Record of Bigotry and Violence (New York: Anti-Defamation League, 1988, pg. 83.]; pg. 31. "Ku Klux Klan terrorism reached perhaps its zenith in the 1960s in response to that decade's civil rights movement. During that period Klan members were involved in the murder of three civil rights workers in Mississippi as well as in the deaths of four small African-American girls in Mobile, Alabama, a church bombing. Urban unrest among minorities made some more fearful and more open to the Klan's ideas. By 1967 the KKK had reached a post-World War II membership high of 55,000. "
Ku Klux Klan world 10,000 - - 1
country
1981 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 32. "...a subsequent investigation conducted by the House of Representatives's Committee on Un-American Activities revealed both questionable KKK financial dealings as well as documented acts of terrorism. The committee's report, along with the criminal convictions and imprisonment of several Klan leaders, resulted in a marked decline for the organization. By 1981 the Ku Klux Klan had had about 10,000 members, among them extremists who futhered the group's already violent reputation. "
Ku Klux Klan - fundamentalist Christian ministers Alabama - - - - 1927 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 28-29. "The Klan also did not look kindly on divorce. In 1927, a group of Alabama Klansmen beat a divorced woman who had just remarried a divorced man. When the intense flogging was over, the men took up a collection for the woman and left her with a salve for her wounds. Before leaving, the Baptist minister who had led the group reminded her that the punishment had been administered 'in a spirit of kindness and correction to set your feet aright.' "
Ku Klux Klan - fundamentalist Christian ministers USA 40,000 - - - 1925 Feldman, Egal. Dual Destinies: The Jewish Encounter with Protestant America; Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press (1990); pg. 183. "According to Wyn Wade's excellent study of the Klan, 40,000 fundamentalist ministers joined the hooded order, many of them achieving high positions in its ranks. They preached pro-Klan sermons in their churches and helped draw from their congregations new members into the movement. "
Ku Klux Klan - fundamentalist Christian ministers USA 40,000 - - - 1929 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 18-19. "Many churches rallied the Klan. As many as forty thousand ministers joined, and Klan members regularly addressed church congregations... By the late 1920s... "
Kudanana Apostolic Faith Mission world - - - - 1999 Shillinger, Kurt (Globe Correspondent). "Africans embrace Christian faith, with native touch " in Boston Globe (page A01, 01/03/99). [Posted to Nurel-l newslist by Frank Kaufmann]; Dateline: Harare, Zimbabwe. Harare, Zimbabwe: "At the edge of a nearby corn patch, Bishop Tobias Tekere of the Kudanana Apostolic Faith Mission reached a crescendo in the fourth hour of his sermon, and his flock rose in hymn.... Memberships are difficult to verify... Bishop Tekere claims 5,000 followers.
Kumyk Russia: Dagestan 282,000 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 294-295. Table with 2 columns: "Ethnic Group " [not religious groups] & "Population "; Pg. 295: "Aside from the Mountain Jews and the Christian Cossacks, the peoples of Dagestan are almost exclusively Muslim. "
Kumyk Russia: Kumyk 300,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Kumyk is situated in Dagestan near the Caspian Sea. 300,000 Kumyks live there? "
Kumyk world 450,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Kumyk is situated in Dagestan near the Caspian Sea. 300,000 Kumyks live there and an additional 150,000 live outside of Kumyk. Just as many other people in the former Soviet Union, the Kumyks have suffered from forced deportation and as- similation policies. The Kumyks are today struggling to maintain their cultural identity. "
Kunari Nigeria - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Kung Bushmen world 4,000 - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 39. "The Bushmen are fast disappearing... From fifteen separate language groups they have been reduced to two or three, notably the Kung Bushmen, numbering some four thousand, who still follow the traditional way of life. "
Kurds Armenia 37,486 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 202-203. "According to the 1970 General Census, there were 37,486 people in the Kurdish colony in Armenia. One-third lived in Erivan, and the rest in the twenty-two villages in the Alaguez and Talinn 'Kurdish district'...; there were also a few mixed villages, usually Kurdish and Azerbaijani, less often Kurdish and Armenian. "
Kurds Asia 30,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Kurdistan stretches over parts of Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Syria. 30 million inhabitants live there. When the Ottoman Empire was dissolved in the 1920s, the Kurds were promised their own state. It never came to that. During the Gulf War Saddam Hussein's persecution of the Kurds were noticed, and the Iraqi troops were forced to pull back from the Iraqi Kurdistan. That territory is today independent. "
Kurds Azerbaijan 200,000 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 203. "Given the absense of credible statistics, I can only offer an estimate for the Kurdish-speaking population of Soviet Azerbaijan. According to my Kurdish sources in the Soviet Union, the correct figure is around 150,000. "
Kurds Georgia (country) 20,960 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 202-203. "According to the 1970 General Census... 20,960 Kurds living in Georgia, mainly in Tbilissi, in the town's Kurdish quarter. The Kurds of Georgia and Armenia are mainly Yezidis. "
Kurds Iran 4,521,280 16.00% - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised 1st American edition). [Original Sources: National Census of Population and Housing, November 1966, Tehran; Monthly Bulletin of Statistics, November 1971, UN, New York.]; pg. 96. "Table 1: The Kurdish Population in Iran "; 1970: Kurds in Iran: 4,521,280; % of Kurds in the Iranian Population: 16.


Kurds, continued

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