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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Know-Nothings, USA

Know-Nothings, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Know-Nothings USA - - - - 1850 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 82. "...the presence of racial extremists on American soil is not a new phenomenon for the United States.. At its height, the American Party (or 'Know Nothings,' as their opponents called them), which organized largely in response to the huge influx of Irish Catholic immigrants in the late 1840s and 1850s, could boast a membership that included five U.S. senators and forty-three U.S. representatives. Know-Nothings dominated the state legislature in Massachusetts and controlled no less than six state governorships. The party declined, however, in the years following the Civil War. "
Know-Nothings USA - - - - 1855 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 13-16. "Because members wanted to keep secret, they were supposed to say, 'I know nothing,' when asked about their organization. Thus the group was called the Know-Nothings. "; Pg. 14: "The main targets of the Know-Nothings' anger were Roman Catholic immigrants--primarily Irish Catholics. The Know-Nothings, or nativists as they were sometimes called... considered Catholicism a foreign and undesirable religion... [They] spread rumors about a Catholic plot to overthrow the government or massacre all Protestants... attacked Irish Catholics, stoned their homes, and burned their churches... Despite their views and behavior the Know-Nothings would not have considered themselves a hate group... The Know-Nothings reached their peak in 1855. Interest in their cause declined after that, as American attention shifted from immigrants to the issue of abolishing slavery and, later, the Civil War. "
Kobe Nishinomiya Jinja Japan - - 3,000
units
- 1996 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 98. "Kobe Nishinomiya jinja: A famous shrine in Nishinomiya (Kobe) dedicatd to 'Nishinomiya Ebisu', the kami of fishermen and merchants. It has about 3,000 branch temples (bunsha) throughout Japan. "
Kodesh Church of Emmanuel USA 560 - 9
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 341. Table: "...the leading holiness groups in the United States at the present time are as follows: " [Table lists figures for "Churches " and "Members " for 28 groups.]
Kodesh Church of Emmanuel world 121 - - - 1929 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Black Holiness; pg. 223. "Kodesh Church of Emmanuel... Bethel Park, PA [H.Q.]... is a black holiness sect that was formed by Reverend Frank Russell Killingsworth when he withdrew from the African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1929 along with 120 followers. "
Kodesh Church of Emmanuel world 121 - - - 1930 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 129. "Kodesh Church Immanuel: Formed in 1929 and incorporated in April 1930 by Frank Russell Killingsworth and 120 lay people, some of whom were former members of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church... "
Kodesh Church of Emmanuel world 560 - 9
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 421. "Kodesh Church Immanuel: A colored religious sect organized by Frank R. Killingsworth in Florida in 1929... There are nine churches and 560 members. "
Kodesh Church of Emmanuel world 326 - 5
units
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Black Holiness; pg. 224. "Kodesh Church of Emmanuel... Membership: In 1980 there were 5 churches, 326 members, and 28 ministers. "
Kodesh Church of Emmanuel world 326 - 5
units
2
countries
1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 129. "Kodesh Church Immanuel... this is an interracial body of approximately 326 members, most of whom are black. The five churches of the denomination are located in Pennsylvania, the District of Columbia, and in Liberia, West Africa... "
Kodo Kyodan Japan 417,636 0.36% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Buddhist new religion (year of origin: 1935).
Kohuana North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 3,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kohuana world 3,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kokuchukai Japan 22,706 0.02% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Shinto new religion (year of origin: 1914).
Komi Russia: Komi 287,695 23.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Komi " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The Republic of Komi is situated in the east of the European part of the Russian Federation, near the Ural mountain range... Approximately 1,250,8470 [sic: should be approx. 1.25 million] people live in the Republic of Komi, represented more than 70 different ethnic groups. Russian comprise the largest population group - 58%, followed by the indigenous Komi people - 23%. Other groups include Ukrainians (8%), Belarussians (2%) and Tatars (2%). Languages: There are two official languages in the Republic - Komi, which belongs to the Finno-Ugric group of languages, and Russian. 74.3% of Komi people speak their mother tongue. Organisations: The Komi is represented in the UNPO by the Komi National Revival Committee. "
Konds India 1,000,000 - - - 1981 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 408-409. "Konds: Alternate Name: Khond; Kondh; Kandha; Ku (self-reference); Location: India (Orissa region); Population: 1 million (1981); Religion: Animism; small number of Christians "; "Christian missionary activity among the Konds is reflected in the roughly 3% of the population who claim the Christian faith. "
Konferenz der Mennoniten der Schweiz (Alttaufer), Conference Mennonite Suisse (Anabaptiste) Switzerland 2,500 - 14
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Europe: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " SWITZERLAND: Konferenz der Mennoniten der Schweiz (Alttaufer), Conference Mennonite Suisse (Anabaptiste); Members: 2,500+/-; Congregations: 14
Konferenz der Mennonitengemeinden in Uruguay Uruguay 503 - 4
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " URUGUAY... Konferenz der Mennonitengemeinden in Uruguay; Members: 503; Congregations: 4
Kongo world 6,000,000 - - 3
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 108, 111-112. "Kongo: Population: 6,000,000; Location: Angola, Zaire, and Congo; Languages: Kikongo, French "; Pg. 111: "Many of the Kongo people converted to Christianity during colonial rule, but the religion never fully took hold and customs of their original religion are still practiced. Traditional reverence for ancestors remains a focal point... Many Kongo homes contain ancestor shrines where families pray for the dead. "
Konkokyo Japan - - - - 1921 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 112-113. "Kyoha Shinto: 'Sect Shinto'... In 1921... the official association of Shinto sects had 13 groups... included revelatory 'new' religious movements... such as Tenrikyo, Kurozumi-kyo and Konko-kyo... "
Konkokyo Japan 500,000 - - - 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969); pg. 293. "Konko kyo was founded by Kawati Bunjiro (1814-1883)... A recent census figure lists some 500,000 members. "
Konkokyo Japan 480,072 0.42% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Shinto new religion (year of origin: 1859).
Konkokyo Japan - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "KONKO KYO: a SHINTO sect founded by Kawade Bunjiro (1814-1883) in 1881 which seeks to revitalize Shint for contemporary society. The name means 'Golden Lustered Teaching.' It emphasized One GOD and good health as a result of fellowship with God and the repudiation of superstition associated with ritual practice and magical charms. "
Konkokyo Japan - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 136-137. "Sect Shinto consists of a wide range of sects with very different philosophies and practices. 13 are officially recognized... Konko Kyo, whose founder claimed divine revelation, worships... Tenchi Kane no Kami ('The God Who Gives Unity to Heaven and Earth'). "
Konkokyo Japan: Tokyo: Ginza - - 1
unit
- 1986 *LINK* Ishii, Kenji. "The Secularization of Religion in the City " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1986: 13/2-3 (viewed online 30 Jan. 1999). "The Ginza in Tokyo is a small district which covers not even one square kilometer... As our investigation revealed, there are at present not less than 36 religious facilities in the district, of which the majority are Inari shrines dedicated to the Fox Deity... Only four are religious institutions in the strict sense with a legal identity and which actively propagate their teachings: the Ginza Church of Konk'oky'o, Ginza (Christian) Church, the Hachikan Shrine, and the H'oju Inari Shrine. The Asahi Inari is a subordinate shrine of the Hie Shrine elsewhere in Tokyo. "
Konkokyo world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 410. "Konko-kyo... Arising in a rural setting during the mid-nineteenth century, it began to penetrate urban centers early in the Meiji period (1868-1912). In the twentieth century is has spread throughout Japan and among Japanese communities abroad... The headquarters.. are located in the founder's hometown, formerly called Otani but subsequently renamed Konko to reflect the eminence of its best-known son. "
Konkokyo world 500,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 208. "Konkokyo membership is estimated at about half a million, and its main temple is in Asagushi city. "
Konkokyo world - - - - 1996 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 105. "Konko-kyo: An independent new religion founded in the 19th century by Kawate, Bunjiro (1814-1883), a peasant from Okayama prefecture. During an ilness Kawate had a mystical encounter with the much-feared Taoist deity Konjin in which the deity revealed his true benevolent nature... The movement, which has branch churches all over Japan and some overseas, was given the status of a Shinto sect in 1990. "
Konomihu North America - Pacific Coast 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Chimariko, Okwanuchu.
Konomihu world 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Chimariko, Okwanuchu.
Konyak Nagas India - northeast - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 708. "The Konyak Nagas of Northeast India refer to the supreme being as Gawang... "
Kootenay Canada 549 - - - 1957 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 75. "Kootenay... Numbered at 1,200 in 1780, today they live on reservations, part in Canada--549 in 1967, and part in Idaho--123 in 1985. "
Kootenay Idaho 123 - - - 1985 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 75. "Kootenay... Numbered at 1,200 in 1780, today they live on reservations, part in Canada--549 in 1967, and part in Idaho--123 in 1985. "
Kootenay North America 1,200 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 75. "Kootenay... Numbered at 1,200 in 1780... "
Koranki Guinea - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Korea Baptist Convention Korea 650,000 - 2,215
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Korean Christian Church in Japan Japan 4,803 - 58
units
- 1985 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "First, with regard to Christianity, there is no widespread growth like that on the Korean mainland. The main Protestant organization is the Zainichi Daikan Kirisuto Ky'kai S'kai (Korean Christian Church in Japan), with 58 churches claiming 4,803 members throughout Japan... (Zainichi Daikan Kirisuto Ky'kai S'kai 1985, pp. 175-176). "
Korean Christian Church in Japan Japan: Osaka 1,460 - 11
units
- 1985 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "First, with regard to Christianity, there is no widespread growth like that on the Korean mainland. The main Protestant organization is the Zainichi Daikan Kirisuto Ky'kai S'kai (Korean Christian Church in Japan), with 58 churches claiming 4,803 members throughout Japan. Eleven of these churches, with 1,460 members, are located in Osaka (Zainichi Daikan Kirisuto Ky'kai S'kai 1985, pp. 175-176). "
Korean Christian Federation Korea, North - - - - 1999 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 123. "North Korea permits only a facade of Christianity to perpetuate the myth of religious tolerance... The government-approved Korean Christian Federation (KCF) presents itself as the presiding body representing 'North Korea's Protestant and Catholic churches.' However, their obeisance to Kim Il Sung... "; pg. 126: "Though Pyongyang's KCF 'Christian' clergy are scrutinized for primary loyalty to Kim Jong Il, many of the laity at Pyongyang's three churches may very well be bona fide believers. "
Korean Presbyterian Church in America USA 26,988 - 203
units
- 1992 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Korean Presbyterian Church in America, General Assembly of the. "
Korean Presbyterian Church in America USA 26,988 - 203
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
Korean Presbyterian Church in America USA 26,988 - 203
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Genl. Assembly of the Korean Presbyterian Church in America
Korean temples Japan: Ikoma - - - - 1988 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "'Korean temples' are particularly densely concentrated in the Zushi valley (12 temples, Kamiishikiri-ch'), Nukata valley (10 temples, Yamate-ch'), and Narukawa valley (6 temples, Kamishij), with a heavy concentration also at the foot of the mountains in Yao City (16 temples) and Ikoma City (8 temples). These temples are conveniently located within ten kilometers of areas with large Korean populations. However, the question remains as to why these temples were built in the valleys of the Ikoma mountains rather than in the towns where the people live. "
Korean temples Japan: Ikoma - - 60
units
- 1988 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "The group of 'Korean temples' in the suburbs of Osaka, where the largest number of Koreans in Japan reside, is a religious phenomenon consisting of a syncretism of Korean Shamanism, Korean Buddhism, and Japanese mountain religion... The 'Korean temples' have been established in this area by the Korean residents mostly since after the war (1945), though a few were started before the war, and have added a new dimension to the religious traditions of Ikoma. Our survey discovered a total of about sixty temples in the Ikoma area. There is no other place in Japan where such a dense collection of Korean religious institutions are to be found, and it is rare even in Korea. "
Korekore Zimbabwe - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Koreshanity world 400 - - - 1908 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 111-112. "The name Koresh, Hebrew for Cyrus, that the Branch Davidian... leader chose for himself, brings to mind another, earlier... leader who called himself Koresh. In the late 19th century, Cyrus Reed Teed, an herbalist in Utica, New York, had a revelation. He said that the earth was hollow, and that we are living on the inside!... Teed also decided that he was the new Messiah and adopted the name Koresh. He called his religion Koreshanity, and the hollow earth was a basic article of faith... Astonishingly, Teed managed to gather several hundred followers... Koresh moved his followers to... Florida, and before his death in 1908 he said that he would rise from the dead... "
Koreshanity world 30 - - - 1961 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 111-112. "[Koreshanity] lingered on and continued to make a few converts. As late as 1961, there were still thirty surviving members. "
Koreshanity world 1 - - - 1983 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 111-112. "The 300-acre tract of land that it owned was turned over to the state of Florida for a Koreshan State Historic Park. The last Koreshanity adherent, who died in 1983, was a guide for the park. "
Koreshanity world 0 - - - 1984 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 111-112. "The 300-acre tract of land that it owned was turned over to the state of Florida for a Koreshan State Historic Park. The last Koreshanity adherent, who died in 1983, was a guide for the park. "
Koriak Russia 9,200 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 217-219. "Koriak: Location: Russia (extreme northeastern Siberia); Population: 9,200; Religion: Native version of shamanism "; Pg. 218: "The traditional religion of the Koriak is a form of shamanism... Koriak shamans were severely persecuted by the Communist government; during Stalin's anti-religious campaigns in the 1930s, many of them were imprisoned and executed. Nevertheless, Koriak shamansim, like Soviet shamanism in general, may have suffered less than other religions. Since shamanism lacked the easily identified places of worship and the stable religious infrastructure of Christianity... it was harder for the government to attack it, and so it survived underground with relative ease. "
Koroa North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 2,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Koroa (1650 with three other small tribes): 2,000 "
Koroa world 2,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Koroa (1650 with three other small tribes): 2,000 "
Kosha Buddhism China - - - - 793 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 184. "Kosha School - the actual meaning is 'School of the Abhidharmakosha'; a school of Chinese Buddhism based on the Abhidharmakosha of Vasubandhu... The Kosha school belongs by its doctrine to the 'realistic' school of the Hinayana... The school existed as such only during the T'an Dynasty; it is mentioned in an official document of 793 as part of the idealistic Fa-hsiang school, since no one actually belonged exclusively to the Kosha faction. In the 7th and 8th centuries the Kosha teachings were brought to Japan. "
Koso North America - Great Basin 500 - - - 1300 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 389. Table: "The Great Basin: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Koso (Aboriginal): 500 (?) "; Pg. 384: "The homeland of another tribe of the Western Shoshoni, the Koso, more popularly known as the Panamint, dwelt in an even drier land, the northern end of Death Valley, but they had the advantage of being able to hunt in the high altitudes of adjacent mountains. "
Koso world 500 - - - 1300 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 389. Table: "The Great Basin: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kotokoli Togo - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Kpele Guinea - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Kpele Liberia - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Kpele world - - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; "Guinea, Liberia "
Krim Africa - West - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; Location listed in table as "West Africa "
Krimmer Mennonite Brethren Conference world - - 10
units
- 1959 Stuber, Stanley I. How We Got Our Denominations: A Primer on Church History. New York: Association Press Revised Ed., 1959); pg. 238. "The Yearbook of American Churches lists the following branches of the Mennonite faith:... Krimmer Mennonite Brethren Conference (10 churches)... "
Kripalu Yoga Massachusetts - - 1
unit
- 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 37. "Yogi Amrit Desai named his practice Kripalu Yoga after his guru, Swami Kripalvanandiji. Desai came to America in 1960 and now runs the Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health in Lenox, Massachusetts, where he stresses awareness of one's inner self while one is in the postures. "
Krishna worship India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 781. "Of the fourteen avatars recognized by most texts and traditions, Rama and Krishna are the two major deities of Vaisnavism, usually but not always exclusive of one another... The Krishna sect... There are many schools of Krishna-centered Vaisnavism across the subcontinent, all of them characterized by poetry and song as expressions of religious devotion... Most... such as that of the Alvars (sixth-tenth centuries) of the Tamil-speaking country an that of Caitanya in Bengal, are devoted to Krishna the youth... They all have much in common, however, and insight into them can be gained by looking at a single one, the Caitanya movement of Bengal. "
Krishna worship India - north - - - - 1540 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 781. "The Krishna sect... There are many schools of Krishna-centered Vaisnavism across the subcontinent... Some of them, such as that represented by the poet Surdas (1483-1563) in North India, have the child Krishna as their deity. "
Krishnamurti Australia - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "So far, 65 religious groups and associations have completed a questionnaire and are listed below... Krishnamurti Australia: Jiddu Krishnamurti is regarded as one of the great religious teacher of our time. For some sixty years he has been travelling throughout the world, giving public talks to increasingly large audiences. He has published over thirty books and founded schools in England, the United States and India. "
Krishnamurti world - - - - 1922 Sann, Paul. Fads, Follies and Delusions of the American People. New York: Crown Publishers, Inc. (1967); pg. 195. "The setting was the Fiftieth Anniversary celebration of the theosophists at Madras, attended by 5,000 delegates from 37 nations... Annie Besant told the essemblage there was a new World Teacher on the way, embracing a new world religion, in the person of Jiddu Krishnamurti, and then he spoke. 'I come for those who want sympathy, who want happiness, who are longing to be released, who are longing to find happiness in all things.' he said. 'I come to reform, not to tear down; not to destroy, but to build.' "


Krishnamurti, continued

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