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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

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kibbutzim, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Kichai North America - Southern Great Plains 500 - - - 1690 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kichai world 500 - - - 1690 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kickapoo Kansas 1,500 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 29. "There are 1,500 Kickapoo in Kansas. "
Kickapoo North America - - - 2
countries
1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 29. "There are Kickapoo lands in Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, and Mexico. There are 1,500 Kickapoo in Kansas. The Texas tribe has just gained federal recognition; no figures are available. "
Kickapoo North America - Central Prairies and Woodlands 2,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kickapoo world 2,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kikuyu Kenya 1,500,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 12). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1561. "Kikuyu. The largest of the 48 tribes living in Kenya, the Kikuyu number some 1 1/2 million people. They came to the attention of the outside world in the 1950s because of their membership of the Mau Mau, a terrorist organization whose avowed aim was to drive the white man out of Kenya... The Mau Mau, however, were not representative of the majority of Kikuyu who usually prefer diplomacy to open warfare with their neighbors. They belong to the great Bantu-speaking group of Negroes and are predominantly agriculturists and goatherders... The Kikuyu religion is fundamentally pagan and animistic, as religion has always been throughout Black Africa. The Kikuyu have a chief god who inhabits the sky... "
Kikuyu Kenya - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 12). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1565. "Most of the customs described here are changing rapidly as the Kikuyu, along with other African tribes, turn their faces towards the modern world. Western methods of exploiting Nature tend to undermine their traditional reverence for forests... All these developments during the last decade, since Kenya became an independent state, have led some observers to fear that the traditional religious beliefs and social customs are being discarded too rapidly, wiht no positive standards to take their place. This, however, is the general effect of progress and Westernization throughout Black Africa. "
Kikuyu Kenya 3,000,000 - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 102, 107. "Kikuyu: Population: 3,000,000; Location: Kenya; Languages: Kikuyu (a Bantu dialect), English "; Pg. 107: "While many of the Kikuyu converted to Christianity during the period of British control, most tried to incorporate their older customs into their newly adopted religion. Today, most of the Kikuyu worship a single god known as Ngai and still believe in the powerful influence of ancestor spirits. Sheep and goats are occasionally used for religious sacrifice. "
Kim Jong Il worship Korea, North - - - - 1999 Nash, Amy K. North Korea (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 96. "Now the Dear Leader has taken command. Kim Jong Il had long been groomed to succeed his father, and when Kim Il Sung died in July 1994 Korea became the first historical instance of a Communist monarchy... The country now also officially worships Kim Jong Il. Homes throughout the country have framed photographs of both men and copies of their written works. The people are told that Kim Jong Il was born on Mount Paekdu like a mythic god, instead of in Siberia as Western analysts contend. Criticism of Kim Jong Il, even in private, is likely to meet with swift punishment. "
Kimbanguist Church Africa 4,000,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 407. "Kimbanguism... the most influential Independent Church on the continent of Africa, with a membership of over four million in Zaire and several neighboring countries. "
Kimbanguist Church Africa 3,000,000 - - - 1984 Turner, Harold W. "New Religious Movements in Primal Societies " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 449. "The largest [syncretistic new religious movement in Africa] is the Kimbanguist Church and the 3 million adherents claimed for it may not be too inaccurate. "
Kimbanguist Church Africa - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "KIMBANGU, Simon (19-?-1951)... his church spread until it is one of the largest in Africa and a member of the WORLD COUNCIL OF CHURCHES. "
Kimbanguist Church world 4,000,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 407. "Kimbanguism. The Church of Jesus Christ on Earth by the Prophet Simon Kimbanu. In the span of sixty years it has mushroomed from a persecuted mass movement to become the most influential Independent Church on the continent of Africa, with a membership of over four million in Zaire and several neighboring countries. "
Kimbanguist Church world 4,000,000 - - - 1986 Mazrui, Ali A. The Africans: A Triple Heritage. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company (1986); pg. 154. "Today the Kimbanguist Church in central Africa claims some 4 million followers. It may not sound like many but... is far more than attend Christian worship throughout Britain each Sunday, out of a population of over 50 million. "
Kimbanguist Church world 3,000,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 203. "Today the church has an estimated three million members in Zaire and the adjacent countries and is also found in western Europe and the United States. "
Kimbanguist Church world 6,500,000 - - - 1996 Guiness Book of World Records 1999. New York: Guiness Publishing Group (1998); pg. 91. Listed in Guiness Book of World Records as "Fastest Growing Religion, " with 6.5 million members in 1996.
Kimbanguist Church world 6,500,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* Doogue, Edmund (Ecumenical News International). "German Churches Contribute Much More to WCC than Others " in Presbyterian News Service, 27 Sept. 1996 (viewed online 11 March 1999). "Those of the WCC's biggest member churches that in 1995 did not pay their membership contribution, or paid only a fraction of what they were supposed to, include... the Church of Jesus Christ on Earth-Kimbanguist Church, in Zaire (6.5 million)... "
Kimbanguist Church Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) 3,500,000 - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 308. "The largest such movement is probably the Kimbanguist Church (l'Eglise de Jesus-Christ sur la Terre par Prophete Simon Kimbangu), to which as many as 3,500,000 people may be affiliated in Zaire alone. "
Kimbanguist Church Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "Among the Christian-based sects and new religions, many retain the Bible as their scripture, although it is given distinctive interpretation through the revelations to their founders... In the twentieth century, new Christian groups tend to be more charismatic. They include the independent churches in Africa such as the Kimbanguists in Zaire and the Brotherhood of the Cross and Star in Nigeria. "
Kimbanguist Church Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) 8,000,000 - - - 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 246. "In Zaire, the Church of the Lord Jesus Christ on Earth of the Prophet Simon Kimbangu, founded by Kimbanu in 1921, and the first such denomination to affiliate with the World Council of Churches, has more than 8 million members, making it the largest independent church on the continent. "
Kimbanguist Church Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) 7,045,500 16.50% - - 1994 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Est. 42.7 million [total pop.] (1994). Majority Christian: 46 to 48 % Roman Catholic, 24 to 28 % Protestant, up to 16.5 % in Kimbanguist Church. About 1 % of population Muslim. Most other people practice traditional African religions.
Kimbanguist Church Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) 4,744,036 10.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Roman Catholic 50%, Protestant 20%, Kimbanguist 10%, Muslim 10%, other syncretic sects and traditional beliefs 10%; Total population: 47,440,362.
Kimbanguist Church Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) 4,649,854 10.00% - - 1998 *LINK* official government web site of Democratic Republic of Congo (former Zaire) Religions : Catholiques romains 50% ; Protestants 20% ; Kimbanguistes 10% ; Musulmans 10% ; autres 10%; [Total] Population : 46.498.539 (estimation)
Kimbanguist Church - active Africa 300,000 - - - 1986 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 41-42. "Bakongo: Alternate Names: Kongo; Location: Congo River region (Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo); Population: 3.3 million "; "Eventually Kimbanguism gained legal recognition from the state, and its church became a staunch supporter of the mobutu regime. Presently, some 300,000 active members belong to the church, most of them living in the Lower Congo. " [The 300,000 figure is quite different from other contemporary estimates. It is perhaps from a dated source. The bibliography lists sources for this article ( "Bakongo ") from 1965, 1985, and 1986. Alternatively, the author means there are 300,000 active members, and higher figures are of a total, but not entirely active membership. Adherents.com does not know.]
Kimbundu Angola - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; listed in table as "Kimbundo "
Kimbundu Angola 2,415,000 23.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 80. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Kimbundu Angola 2,716,128 25.00% - - 1998 *LINK* CIA World Factbook 1998 (viewed June 24, 1999) Ethnic groups: Ovimbundu 37%, Kimbundu 25%, Bakongo 13%, mestico (mixed European and Native African) 2%, European 1%, other 22%; Total population: 10,864,512.
Kimilsungism Korea, North - - - - 1977 Gascoigne, Bamber. The Christians; New York: William Morrow & Co. (1977); pg. 290. "In one poster of the thirties Stalin was to be seen smiling benevolently in the night sky above the Kremlin. Marx would no doubt have been horrified to see his face mounted on gigantic placards beside Stalin or Mao, but in North Korea--where the cult of personality has been carried to its furthest extremes--Marx, Engels & Lenin have all been dropped from the pantheon. The theoretical basis of the creed is now referred to not as Marxism but Kimilsungism, and Kim Il Sung appears alone on the hoardings. It is arguable that all Communist countries have merely replaced old gods with new, but so far only North Korea has achieved monotheism. "
Kimilsungism Korea, North - - - - 1999 Nash, Amy K. North Korea (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 96. "The Cult of Kim and Chuche [Juche]... In many ways, the North Korean people worshiped Kim Il Sung [who died in 1994] as a god. His countrypeople called him the 'Great Leader' and his son, Kim Jong Il, the 'Dear Leader.' Children were taught from an early age to honor the Great Leader as the heroic father-figure who would protect them from outside evils. Even after his death, Kim Il Sung commands great reverence among the people. His huge memorial in Pyongyan receives thousands of mourners daily who pay their respects and lay wreaths. "
King of Kings Mission Jamaica 800 - - - 1943 Chevannes, Barry. Rastafari: Roots and Ideology. Syracuse, New York: Syracuse University Press (1994); pg. 141-142. "...in the early 1940s... Being secretary, Biini saw the mission through an intensive period of growth, in which, he said, membership grew from a mere 100 to about 250 in a matter of 8 months, and over the next few years to some 800... division and conflict in the organization between the young men in leading positions, and among the membership led to the breakup of the King of Kings Mission... By mid-1940s a group of them elected Morris... "
KINGMI (CMA) Indonesia 250,000 - - - 1978 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD, by P. J. Johnstone STL Publications, P. O. Box 48, Bromley, Kent, England. Published in 1978); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Christianity:
Other [Christian] groups: "KINGMI " (CMA) 250,000 community
Kiowa North America 2,000 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 51. "Kiowa... They numbered 2,000 in 1780 and 4,000 in 1985 in Oklahoma. "
Kiowa North America - Southern Great Plains 2,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kiowa Oklahoma 4,000 - - - 1985 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 51. "Kiowa... They numbered 2,000 in 1780 and 4,000 in 1985 in Oklahoma. "
Kiowa USA 9,421 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Kiowa USA 9,421 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Kiowa world 2,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kiowa Apache North America - Southern Great Plains 300 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); A group distinct from "Kiowa "
Kiowa Apache world 300 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); A group distinct from "Kiowa "
Kipsigis Kenya - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Kirdi Cameroon 1,375,000 11.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 66. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Kirdi Chad - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Kirghiz China 75,000 0.01% - - 1984 McLenighan, Valjean. China (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1984); pg. 117. "There are probably about half a million Kazakhs in China and 75,000 Kirghiz. " [These are not distinct religions, but ethnic groups which practice Islam.]
Kirghiz China: Xinjiang - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 41. "In the autonomous region of Xinjiang, Uighurs remain the largest existing ethnic group, but make up only 45 percent of the population. Only when grouped together with the Kazakhs, Kirghiz and others do Uighurs constitute an Islamic, Turkic-speaking majority. "
Kiribati Protestant Church Kiribati 29,432 37.90% 129
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Kiribati/Kiribati Protestant Church (KPC) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Kiribati Protestant Church (KPC)... Country information: Population: 77,658... Main religions: Christianity (95%)... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 29,432/129. "
Kiribati Protestant Church Kiribati - - - - 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Kiribati "; web page: "Religion "; Originally by Jonathan Willis-Richards. This version edited by Mike Pearson. Viewed 31 May 1999. "Kiribati Protestant Church (KPC): Headquarters at Tangintebu, Tarawa. Almost entirely staffed by I-Kiribati, except for some teaching positions. Dominate the Southern Gilberts... "
Kiribati Protestant Church world 29,432 - 129
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Kiribati/Kiribati Protestant Church (KPC) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Kiribati Protestant Church (KPC)... Country information: Population: 77,658... Main religions: Christianity (95%)... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 29,432/129. "
Kirridth Yordtharrngba world - - - 8
countries
1999 Email response "Kakkib li'Dthia Warrawee'a " , who represents Kirridth Yordtharrngba [an Australian aboriginal religion] at AllExperts.com. "We do not keep statistics of followers and there is not a 'membership' as such; however there are followers in the U.S.; U.K.; Europe; India; Malaysia; Canada; Japan; and Australia. The following is not large; but there is a considerable following in Australia and the U.S. and this is steadily growing. " [8 countries at least, perhaps more depending on how many countries in Europe]
Kissi Africa - West - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; Location listed in table as "West Africa "
Kitawala Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) - - - - 1910 McKown, Robin. The Republic of Zaire. New York: Franklin Watts (1972); pg. 49. "... early 1900's... Another black Christian religion sprang up east of the Lualaba River. Called Kitawala, it was inspired by American missionaries. The Kitawalists were also persecuted. Two of their leaders were hanged and others were imprisoned. "
Klamath North America - Pacific Coast 1,200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Klamath world 1,200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kleinegemeinde in Mexiko Mexico 1,335 - 12
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " MEXICO... Kleinegemeinde in Mexiko; Members: 1,335; Congregations: 12
Kleinegemeinde zu Blue Creek Belize 216 - 2
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " BELIZE... Kleinegemeinde zu Blue Creek... Members: 216; Congregations: 2 [This is listed as a distinct org. from Blue Creek Evangelical Mennonite Mission Church]
Kleinegemeinde zu Spanish Lookout Belize 658 - 4
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " BELIZE... Kleinegemeinde zu Spanish Lookout... Members: 658; Congregations: 4
Kleinere freie Apostelgemeinden (Gemeinschaft des gottlichen Sozialismus, Apostelamt Juda) Germany 3,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Kleinere freie Apostelgemeinden, z.B. Gemeinschaft des göttlichen Sozialismus, Apostelamt Juda " in table. Source: REMID.
Klickitat North America - Pacific Coast 600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Taidnapam
Klickitat world 600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Taidnapam
Knanaya USA 1,050 - - - 1996 *LINK* web page viewed 1998; Link now broken (27 Feb. 1999) Christianity:Catholic:Syro-Malabar:
There are approximately 350 Jacobite Knanaya families living in North America (1996).
Knanaya world 200,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* official web site Christianity:Catholic:Syro-Malabar:
This 200,000+ strong community is under the Bishop of Kottayam, who enjoys personal jurisdiction over all Knanaya Catholics.
Knights of the Ku Klux Klan - Don Black faction USA - - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 50. "There are more than a dozen splinter [KKK] organizations. The major ones are as follows:... The Knights of the Ku Klux Klan has two factions. Don Black, leader of one of the factions, was arrested in 1987 when a mob of Klansmen hurled rocks, bottles, and mud at marching civil rights activists celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday in Forsyth, Georgia. The Southern Poverty Law Center stepped in again, suing the Klan for conspiracy to violate the activists' right of free expression. In November 1988, the court awarded the marchers $950,400 in damages, and another gaping hole was burned into the purses of the Ku Klux Klan. "
Knights of the Ku Klux Klan - Stanley McCollum faction USA 750 - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 50. "There are more than a dozen splinter [KKK] organizations. The major ones are as follows:... The other faction, headed by Stanley McCollum, has a membership of some 750 and has been recruiting new members by taking on the appeal of a religions organization. He is also strongly allied with the Aryan Nations. "
Know-Nothings New York - - - - 1849 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 13-15. "One of the first organizations in the U.S. that could be called a hate group was the Order of the Star-Spangled Banner. It was founded in New York City in 1849. "
Know-Nothings USA - - - - 1845 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 18. "When thousands of Catholics immigrated to the United States in the 1830s, they were resented because they competed for the same jobs as those already here. Catholic immigrants were attacked on the street, and their homes were stoned. Later, Catholic churches and homes were stormed and burned by rioting mobs, and dozens of people were killed. In the 1840s, an anti-alien and anti-Catholic secret society was formed. The so-called Know Nothings provoked riots, terror, and national suspicion agains Catholic Irish-Americans for almost twenty years. "


Know-Nothings, continued

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