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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Jumano, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Jumma Bangladesh: Chittagong Hill Tracts - 89.00% - - 1947 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Chittagong Hill Tracts " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The total population of the CHT, in 1991 census, was 974,445 of which 51.43% were indigenous Jumma people and 48.57% were non-indigenous Bengalis. At the time of the independence of India in 1947, only 9% of the population of the CHT was non-indigenous. "
Jumma Bangladesh: Chittagong Hill Tracts 501,157 51.43% - - 1991 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Chittagong Hill Tracts " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The total population of the CHT, in 1991 census, was 974,445 of which 51.43% were indigenous Jumma people and 48.57% were non-indigenous Bengalis "
Jumma Bangladesh: Chittagong Hill Tracts 500,000 51.43% - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Chittagong Hill Tracts. The territory is situated in Bangladesh. The many peoples, which live there, are referred to by the common name, the Jumma People and consist of 500,000 inhabitants. They differ from the Bengalis, which represent a majority in the rest of Bangladesh. At the time of the independence of India in 1947, the Bengalis were 0.3% of the population in the Chittagong Hill Tracts. Today 48.57% of the population in Chittagong Hill Tracts are Bengalis. "
Jupiter Dolichenus Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1928. "During the Hellenistic period... very little is heard about Mysteries. But at the time of the Roman Empire such religions suddenly sprang up. The best-known are the Mysteries of Isis and Mithras. However, there were also groups which worshipped... the Syrian gods Adonis, Jupiter Dolichenus and Helios of Emesa. "
Kabbalah world - - - - 1200 C.E. Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 119. "Kabbalah: The mystical, theosophical system developed in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, culminating in the Zohar, and later reinterpreted and recast by Isaac Luria, the Ari, in sixteenth-century Safed. Essentially, there are two distinct Kabbalistic systems, the Zoharic and the Lurianic, though the latter sees itself as no more than an elaboration of the former. The word Kabbalah means 'tradition'. This term was used in the earlier Jewish sources for the Jewish tradition as a whole but was appropriated by the Kabbalists to denote their own secret doctrine, believed to be preserved by the initiates as the true, inner meaning of the Torah reaching back to Moses and even, in some versions, to Adam. Another name for the Kabbalah is, in fact, Hokhmah Nistarah, 'Secret Science.' " [More, pg. 119-120.]
Kabbalah world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 120. "Kabbalah: ...Although, to some extent, Halakhah and Kabbalah were rivals for the attention of students of the Torah, a number of customs and practices based on the Kabbalah found their way into the standard Codes and are followed by Orthodox Jews even if they are non-Kabbalists or anti-Kabbalists. Reform Judaism in the nineteenth century tended to see the Kabbalah as nothing more than superstition and irrationalism but, nowadays, many Reformers acknowledge that the Kabbalah contains a wealth of insights still of value for the cultivation of Jewish spirituality. "
Kabir Panth India - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 159-160. "Chamars: Alternate Names: Untouchables; Scheduled Caste; Location: Northern India (mainly Uttar Pradesh state) "; "Chamars form one of the major occupational castes of India... In general, Chamars are Hindus... Given their low status in traditional Hindu society, it is not surprising that Chamars have been attracted to religions that downplay or reject notions of untouchability... Many are followers of devotional (bhakti) Hindu sects such as Kabir Panth. One such group is the Satnami Chamar of Madhya Pradesh. "
Kabir Panth India - - - - 1998 *LINK* Kalidas, S. "VARANASI: Rhythms of Change " in India Today (June 22, 1998), viewed online 11 April 1999. "The Kabir math.. is also the centre of the Kabir Panth, whose members are followers of Kabir's secular, pacifist and mystical vision. The current head of the math is not around but an inmate, Gopal Das Shastri, shows us around. In post-liberalisation, post-nuclear, consumerist India, the Kabir Panth in its place of origin seems sincere and dedicated, but devoid of a sense of purpose. "
Kabir Panth India - Oraons - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 605. "There are a number of Hinduized cults, known as bhagats, found within traditional Oraon society... The Kabirpanthi sect (followers of the 15th-century reformer Kabir) and the Tana Bhagat are two of the more important of these Hindu groups among the Oraons. Census returns show that nearly 60% of Oraons are now Hindu. "
Kabrai Togo - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Kadampa Tibet - - - - 950 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 167. "Kadampa, Tib., lit. 'oral instruction'; a school of Tibetan Buddhism founded by Atisha. After the degeneration of Buddhism in Tibet in the 10th century, this school saw the correct exposition of the traditional writings as its primary task... This school did not survive as an independent tradition, but the Kadampa transmissions were absorbed by the other schools, particularly by the Gelugpa school. "
Kadars India - south - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Speakers of Dravidian languages are found mainly in South India and include primitive hunters and food gatherers such as Chenchus and Kadars... "
Kadohadacho Confederacy North America - Southern Great Plains 2,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kadohadacho Confederacy world 2,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kagyu - Baram Tibet - - - - 1150 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 167-168. "Kagyupa, Tib., lit. 'oral transmission'; one of the four principal schools of Tibetan Buddhism... In the 12th century... Gampopa integrated the doctrines of the Kadampas into the Kagyu tradition and formed it into an independent school, which was named after the birthplace of its founder, Dagpo-Kagyu. Already in the next generation four further schools developed out of this: (1) Kamtshang or Karma Kagyu, (2) Tsalpa Kagyu, (3) Baram Kagyu, (4) Phagmo Drupa Kagyu. The last of these divided into 8 subschools of which the Drugpa Kagyu and the Drigung Kagyu still exist. "
Kagyu - Drigung Tibet - - - - 1150 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 167-168. "Kagyupa, Tib., lit. 'oral transmission'; one of the four principal schools of Tibetan Buddhism... In the 12th century... Gampopa integrated the doctrines of the Kadampas into the Kagyu tradition and formed it into an independent school, which was named after the birthplace of its founder, Dagpo-Kagyu. Already in the next generation four further schools developed out of this: (1) Kamtshang or Karma Kagyu, (2) Tsalpa Kagyu, (3) Baram Kagyu, (4) Phagmo Drupa Kagyu. The last of these divided into 8 subschools of which the Drugpa Kagyu and the Drigung Kagyu still exist. "
Kagyu - Drugpa Tibet - - - - 1150 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 167-168. "Kagyupa, Tib., lit. 'oral transmission'; one of the four principal schools of Tibetan Buddhism... In the 12th century... Gampopa integrated the doctrines of the Kadampas into the Kagyu tradition and formed it into an independent school, which was named after the birthplace of its founder, Dagpo-Kagyu. Already in the next generation four further schools developed out of this: (1) Kamtshang or Karma Kagyu, (2) Tsalpa Kagyu, (3) Baram Kagyu, (4) Phagmo Drupa Kagyu. The last of these divided into 8 subschools of which the Drugpa Kagyu and the Drigung Kagyu still exist. "
Kagyu - Kamtshang Tibet - - - - 1150 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 167-168. "Kagyupa, Tib., lit. 'oral transmission'; one of the four principal schools of Tibetan Buddhism... In the 12th century... Gampopa integrated the doctrines of the Kadampas into the Kagyu tradition and formed it into an independent school, which was named after the birthplace of its founder, Dagpo-Kagyu. Already in the next generation four further schools developed out of this: (1) Kamtshang or Karma Kagyu, (2) Tsalpa Kagyu, (3) Baram Kagyu, (4) Phagmo Drupa Kagyu. The last of these divided into 8 subschools of which the Drugpa Kagyu and the Drigung Kagyu still exist. "
Kagyu - Karma Germany 3,000 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Karma-Kagy?Verein " in table. Source: Meier-Hüsing. Listed in "Buddhism " section.
Kagyu - Karma Tibet - - - - 1150 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 167-168. "Kagyupa, Tib., lit. 'oral transmission'; one of the four principal schools of Tibetan Buddhism... In the 12th century... Gampopa integrated the doctrines of the Kadampas into the Kagyu tradition and formed it into an independent school, which was named after the birthplace of its founder, Dagpo-Kagyu. Already in the next generation four further schools developed out of this: (1) Kamtshang or Karma Kagyu, (2) Tsalpa Kagyu, (3) Baram Kagyu, (4) Phagmo Drupa Kagyu. The last of these divided into 8 subschools of which the Drugpa Kagyu and the Drigung Kagyu still exist. "
Kagyu - Karma Tibet - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 175. "Karma Kagyu, Tib., lit. 'Orgal Transmission Lineage of the Karma-pas'; a subdivision of the Kagyupa school, founded in the 12th century by Dusum Khyenpa... The Karma Kagyus were strongly supportive of the Rime movement and are now one of the most successful Buddhist schools in the West. "
Kagyu - Phagmo Drupa Tibet - - - - 1150 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 167-168. "Kagyupa, Tib., lit. 'oral transmission'; one of the four principal schools of Tibetan Buddhism... In the 12th century... Gampopa integrated the doctrines of the Kadampas into the Kagyu tradition and formed it into an independent school, which was named after the birthplace of its founder, Dagpo-Kagyu. Already in the next generation four further schools developed out of this: (1) Kamtshang or Karma Kagyu, (2) Tsalpa Kagyu, (3) Baram Kagyu, (4) Phagmo Drupa Kagyu. The last of these divided into 8 subschools of which the Drugpa Kagyu and the Drigung Kagyu still exist. "
Kagyu - Shangpa Tibet - - - - 1350 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 167-168. "Kagyupa, Tib., lit. 'oral transmission'; one of the four principal schools of Tibetan Buddhism... A further school associated with the Kagyu, was founded by Khyungpo Naljor (1310-?). It bears the name Shangpa Kagyu and possesses a special mahamudra transmission, which originated with Naropa's sister Niguma. Through the effort of the Rime movement, this tradition still exists. "
Kagyu - Tsalpa Tibet - - - - 1150 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 167-168. "Kagyupa, Tib., lit. 'oral transmission'; one of the four principal schools of Tibetan Buddhism... In the 12th century... Gampopa integrated the doctrines of the Kadampas into the Kagyu tradition and formed it into an independent school, which was named after the birthplace of its founder, Dagpo-Kagyu. Already in the next generation four further schools developed out of this: (1) Kamtshang or Karma Kagyu, (2) Tsalpa Kagyu, (3) Baram Kagyu, (4) Phagmo Drupa Kagyu. The last of these divided into 8 subschools of which the Drugpa Kagyu and the Drigung Kagyu still exist. "
Kaharingan Indonesia 330,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 582. "The Indonesian state's requirement that all citizens adhere to a monotheistic religion was threatened the practice of the Ngaju's traditional animism. In response, Ngaju have formalized their religion under the name of Kaharingan... & [had] the religion classified as an 'offshoot' of Balinese Hinduism. Kaharingan claims 330,000 adherents, including many Dayak who are not Ngaju. There is a 16-member council (almost all Ngaju) to coordinate theology and rituals; however, this does not include balian or basir. Through a 300-page study book..., Hindu-Balinese-style meeting halls, and sermons, prayers, and hymns, the council aims to instill concepts of individual salvation & a supreme being... Nowadays, no tiwah celebration takes place without being registered with the council, which directs the police to issue the required permit. "
Kaharingan Indonesia - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 300. "Hinduism (3% of the population) in Indonesia means almost exclusively the religion of Bali, which is not a direct transplant of Indian religion but rather a synthesis of indigenous and Indian elements. In addition, some ethnic groups have succeeded in legitimizing their own animist religions by having them reclassified as 'Hinduism,' e.g., the Aluk To Dolo of the Sa'dan Toraja, and the Kaharingan of the Dayak. "
Kaingang Brazil 1,200 - - - 1912 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. viii. "The Kaingang, from the state of Sao Paulo, numbered 1,200 in 1912... "
Kaingang Brazil 200 - - - 1916 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. viii. "The Kaingang, from the state of Sao Paulo, numbered 1,200 in 1912, only 200 in 1916... "
Kaingang Brazil 80 - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. viii. "The Kaingang, from the state of Sao Paulo, numbered 1,200 in 1912, only 200 in 1916, and today have dwindled to 80. "
Kaingang world 80 - - 1
country
1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. viii. "The Kaingang, from the state of Sao Paulo, numbered 1,200 in 1912, only 200 in 1916, and today have dwindled to 80. "
Kakure Kirishitan Japan 150,000 - - - 1614 *LINK* Nosco, Peter. "Secrecy and the transmission of tradition: Issues in the study of the 'underground' Christians " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies (March 1993, 20/1), pg. 3. (viewed on JJRS web site 30 Jan. 1999) "DURING THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY as many as 150,000 for the most part poorly catechized and ill prepared Japanese Christians went 'underground' in response to persecution by the Tokugawa state. The story of these people and their successors‹the so-called kakure Kirishitan (hidden Christians) "
Kakure Kirishitan Japan - - - - 1850 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 83. "Kakure kirishitan: 'Hidden Christians' who survived the early Tokugawa persecutions, compulsory Buddhist registration and forced renunciation of Christianity during the two-century sakoku ('closed country') period to re-emerge as distinctive religious communities in the mid-nineteenth century. In some cases the kakure kirishitan adopted Shinto tendencies, partly as camouflage and partly to perpetuate indigenous ancestor-veneration... "
Kakure Kirishitan Japan: Amakusa and Sakitsu 6,000 - - - 1868 *LINK* Nosco, Peter. "Secrecy and the transmission of tradition: Issues in the study of the 'underground' Christians " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies (March 1993, 20/1), pg. 23. (viewed on JJRS web site 30 Jan. 1999) "it is estimated that there were five to six thousand Christians in Amakusa and Sakitsu in the 1860s; and Fr. Prudence Girard estimated that there were some 20,000 Christians in some 40 to 50 communities in and near Nagasaki. "
Kakure Kirishitan Japan: Nagasaki 20,000 - 50
units
- 1868 *LINK* Nosco, Peter. "Secrecy and the transmission of tradition: Issues in the study of the 'underground' Christians " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies (March 1993, 20/1), pg. 23. (viewed on JJRS web site 30 Jan. 1999) "it is estimated that there were five to six thousand Christians in Amakusa and Sakitsu in the 1860s; and Fr. Prudence Girard estimated that there were some 20,000 Christians in some 40 to 50 communities in and near Nagasaki. "
Kakure Kirishitan Japan: Sotome 8,000 - - - 1868 *LINK* Nosco, Peter. "Secrecy and the transmission of tradition: Issues in the study of the 'underground' Christians " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies (March 1993, 20/1), pg. 23. (viewed on JJRS web site 30 Jan. 1999) "Fr. De Rotz estimated that there were some eight thousand Christians in Sotome when he arrived in the late 1860s "
Kale Heywet Church Ethiopia 1,500,000 - 3,500
units
- 1999 *LINK* "Eastern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "In 1974, the SIM-related congregations formed their own denomination called the Kale Heywet Church (KHC), which today numbers 3,500 congregations and 1.5 million baptized believers. "
Kale Hiywot Church of Eritrea Eritrea 336 - 3
units
- 1999 *LINK* "Eastern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Today the Kale Hiywot Church of Eritrea (KHCE) has an orphanage at Dekemhare and is composed of three functional churches and several fellowships with a total of 336 members. "
Kalenjin Kenya - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Kalenjin Kenya 2,700,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 230, 232. "Kalenjin: Location: Kenya; Population: About 2.7 million "; "Currently, nearly everyone professes to being a member of some organized religion--either Christianity or Islam. Major Christian sects include the Africa Inland Church (AIC), the Church of the Province of Kenya (CPK), and the Roman Catholic Church. Muslims are relatively few in number among the Kalenjin. Generally speaking, today only older people can recall details of traditional religious beliefs. " [NOTE: This statistic is of tribal/ethnic affiliation, NOT a count of those practicing Kalenjin traditional religion.]
Kali worship India - - - - 1800 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1555. "In the shrine of Danteshwari... in Bastar, Central India, human heads were regularly presented at [Kali's] altar. "
Kali worship India - - - - 1870 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1554. "Until a century ago, travelers in lonely parts of India ran the risk of being ritually strangled in honour of Kali... "
Kali worship India - - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 24. "The lower classes, in their fear of the dreadful Kali, have sometimes gone to morbid extremes to please her. From the 13th to the 19th Centuries, devotees known as thugi, from which the English word thug comes, went around the countryside strangling human victims in the belief that a human sacrifice would satisfy Kali's thirst for blood for a thousand years. Even with approval of the Brahmans, who discouraged blood sacrifices, the British authorities had great difficulty in suppressing the thugi, and some Kali votaries still kill animals in her name. "
Kali worship India - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1555. "Most other gods of India today are satisfied with simple offerings of flowers, coconuts, rice and fruit, but Kali remains the chief goddess to whom blood sacrifices continue to be made, though owing to the restrictions imposed by enlightened legislation the victim is now usually a goat. "
Kali worship India: West Bengal - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1555. "The worship of Kali remains widely prevalent in Bengal among all classes of the population, and the biggest temple raised in her honour is that of Kalighata; Calcutta, which was built in the environs of a small village where the temple stands, is an anglicized version of this name. "
Kali worship India: West Bengal - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 398. "Kali... Kali is widely worshiped to this day in Bengal as the supreme mother. "
Kalinga Philippines 40,000 - - - 1975 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 363. "Kalinga; Location: Philippines (northern Luzon); Population: Estimated at 40,000 in the 1970s; Language: Kalinga; Religion: Native spirit beliefs "; "In the 1970s, the Kalinga numbered 40,000 (though the population is much larger now)... "; "Christian conversion (mostly to Catholicism) has remained limited due to the daunting geographical barriers to missionary penetration. "
Kalki movement India 5,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* "Briefly... " in Hinduism Today International (June 1997) "Has God arrived? So believe five million people in India alone... " the report continues. The Kalki Yagnas Trust, headquartered near Chennai, says there are now Kalki centers worldwide.
Kalmyks New Jersey - - 3
units
- 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 203, 206. "The Kalmyks in the United States have four functioning temples--three in Howell, New Jersey, and one in Philadelphia. "
Kalmyks Pennsylvania: Philadelphia - - 1
unit
- 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 203, 206. "The Kalmyks in the United States have four functioning temples--three in Howell, New Jersey, and one in Philadelphia. "
Kalmyks Russia 174,528 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 203, 205-206. "Kalmyks: Location: Russia (Republic of Kalmykia in the southwest); Population: 174,528 [1989]; Religion: Tibetan sect of Mahayana Buddhism (Lamaism) "; "The Kalmyks were faithful and fervent Buddhists, following the faith of their forebears. If Kalmykia is classified as a part of Europe, then the Kalmyks would be considered the only Buddhist ethnic group inhabiting Europe. They belong to the Tibetan 'Yellow Hat' or Gelugpa (Virtuous Way) sect of the Mahayana or Northern branch of Buddhism, which is also commonly referred to as Lamaism. It still contains an admixture of indigenous beliefs and shamanistic practices. The Kalmyks were converted from their earlier shamanistic beliefs to Tibetan Buddhism shortly before they reached the Lower Volga area in the early 17th century. "
Kalmyks Russia: Kalmykia - - - - 1931 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 203, 205-206. "Kalmyks: Location: Russia (Republic of Kalmykia in the southwest); Population: 174,528 [1989]; Religion: Tibetan sect [Geluk] of Mahayana Buddhism (Lamaism) "; "Religion in the Kalmyk Autonomous Republic was completely suppressed [by Soviets]. All Buddhist temples were either closed or destroyed. The last elected religions head of the Kalmyk people, Lama Lubsan Sharab Tepkin (born in 1875), was arrested in 1931, tried, condemned, and exiled... "
Kalmyks Russia: Kalmykia 174,528 - 1
unit
- 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 203, 206. "Kalmyks: Location: Russia (Republic of Kalmykia in the southwest); Population: 174,528 [1989]; Religion: Tibetan sect [Geluk] of Mahayana Buddhism (Lamaism) "; "The first sign of the revival of Buddhism [after Soviet suppression] in Kalmykia can be dated to January 1989, when the first (albeit small) khurul (Kalmyk Buddhist temple) began to function in Elista. In June of that year, the first group of 10 Kalmyk boys was selected and sent to Ulan Bator in Mongolia to study Buddhist scriptures and prayers at the local Buddhist academy. "
Kalmyks USA - - 4
units
- 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 203, 206. "The Kalmyks in the United States have four functioning temples--three in Howell, New Jersey, and one in Philadelphia. "
Kalmyks world - - - 2
countries
1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 203, 206. "Kalmyks: Location: Russia (Republic of Kalmykia in the southwest); Population: 174,528 [1989]; Religion: Tibetan sect [Geluk] of Mahayana Buddhism (Lamaism) "; "On 5 October 1996, the first large-scale multistoried temple was opened and consecrated. Many other temples have been built throughout Kalmykia. The Kalmyks in the United States have four functioning temples--three in Howell, New Jersey, and one in Philadelphia. "
Kamba world 1,500,000 - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 93, 98. "Kamba: Population: 1,500,000; Location: Kenya and northern Tanzania; Languages: Kiswahili, Kikamba, English "; Pg. 98: "Although the influence of British missionaries meant that many of the Kamba converted to Christianity, aspects of their native religion remain an important part of their life. Traditional religious customs include belief in one central God, the presence of ancestor spirits, and an afterlife where the dead are reunited with loved ones and friends... "
Kamia North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 400 - - - 1300 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Date given only as "ancient "
Kamia world 400 - - - 1300 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Date given only as "ancient "
Kammu Laos 500,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 367-368. "Kammu; Location: Laos; Population: About 500,000; Language: Kammu "; "The Kammu are mostly animists, people who believe in spirits, although a few are Buddhist or Christian... "
Kandyan Sinhalese Sri Lanka 4,000,000 24.24% - - 1988 Zimmermann, Robert. Sri Lanka (series: "Enchantment of the World "). Chicago: Childrens Press (1992); pg. 18-19. "Sri Lanka's population had reached over 16.5 million in 1988... "; "Sri Lanka is a multicultural state. The most important group is the Sinhalese who form 74% of the population. About 7 million of these are low-country Sinhalese who live on the plains, and 4 million Kandyan Sinhalese [An ethnic group] who live in the hill country. "
Kanisa la Mennonite Tanzania Tanzania 32,100 - 290
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Africa: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " TANZANIA: Kanisa la Mennonite Tanzania... Members: 32,100; Congregations: 290
Kanjipantha India - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: Jainworld; web page: "History of various sects " (viewed 16 Jan. 1999) "In connection with the account of the major and minor sub-sects prevailing among the Digambara sect, it is worth while to note that in recent years in the Digambara sect a new major sub-sect known as 'Kanji-pantha', consisting of the followers of Kanji Swami is being formed and is getting popular especially among the educated sections...in practical view point, are not approved by the Digambaras in general... However, the influence of Kanjipantha is steadily increasing and Sonagarh town in Gujarat and Jaipur in Rajasthan have become the centers of varied religious activities of the Kanajipanthis. "
Kansa North America 3,000 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 43. "Kansa... Their population was estimated at 3,000 in 1780. "
Kansa North America - Northern Great Plains 3,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Kansa Oklahoma 543 - - - 1985 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 43. "Kansa... In 1985, 543 were counted in Oklahoma. "
Kansa world 3,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)


Kansa, continued

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