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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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back to Ji, Japan

Ji, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Ji Dejiao Malaysia - - 9
units
- 1982 *LINK* Yoshihara, Kazuo. "Dejiao: A Chinese Religion in Southeast Asia " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "Most of the Dejiao groups which belong to the general Dejiao league called the Nangyang Moral Uplifting (Dejiao) General Society have names beginning with the character Zi, but another group, including the Ji De Ge in Perak, have names beginning with the character Ji... The Ji group Dejiao had nine organizations as of 1982 [in Malay]. "
Jicarilla Apache North America - Southern Great Plains 800 - - - 1845 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Jicarilla Apache world 800 - - - 1845 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Jie Uganda - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Jikko Kyo Japan - - - - 1921 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 112-113. "Kyoha Shinto: 'Sect Shinto'... In 1921... the official association of Shinto sects had 13 groups... list also included Izumo oyashiro-kyo, Jikko-kyo, Misogi-kyo, Shinshu-kyo, Shinto shuseiha and Shinri-rikyo. "
Jikko Kyo Japan - - - - 1996 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 69. "Jikko-kyo: 'Practice Teaching'. One of the thirteen sects of kyoha [sect] shinto. It developed out of a lay mountain-religion tradition founded in the early 18th century by Ito, Jikigyo... The teachings were reinterpreted by Kotani Sanshi Rokugyo (d. 1841)... it was recognized as a sect supervised by the Shinto jimukyoku... in 1873. In 1882 it became an independent sect called Shinto Jikko-kyo... The sect combined reverence for Mt. Fuji with emperor-worship and broadly Confucian ethical principles... Today the teachings emphasise cheerfulness and sincerity in daily work. Thousands of members dressed in white climb Fuji every August... "
Jikko Kyo Japan - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 136. "Sect Shinto consists of a wide range of sects with very different philosophies and practices. 13 are officially recognized... Some sects focus on worship of mountains... Members of Jikko Kyo and Fuso Kyo worship Mount Fuji...; Mitake Kyo centers around the worship of Mount Ontake... "
Jimmy Swaggart audience USA 2,300,000 - - - 1986 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 279-280. "From February 1986 to July 1988 Jimmy Swaggart's viewers in the United States went from 2.3 million to 836,000, according to the Arbitron Ratings Company... "
Jimmy Swaggart audience USA 836,000 - - - 1988 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 279-280. "Since the PTL, Swaggart, and Oral Roberts scandals, TV evangelists have lost a staggering amount of support. From February 1986 to July 1988 Jimmy Swaggart's viewers in the United States went from 2.3 million to 836,000, according to the Arbitron Ratings Company... "
Jimmy Swaggart audience world - - - 140
countries
1985 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 279-280. "Fundamentalism's most visible strength is its effective use of the media, an outlandish, incongruous, perfect balance: the hard edge of technology in service to the high touch of religion.

- Before falling from grace, Jimmy Swaggart had broadcast in 140 countries weekly and in fifteen different languages. He claimed to reach one third of the planet. "

Jimmy Swaggart audience world 500,000,000 - - - 1986 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 277. "At the height of his fame, before his widely publicized 'fall,' it is estimated that Swaggart was reaching 500 million people, the largest television audience ever to watch a regularly scheduled program of any kind. His preaching was carried on more than 3,000 stations not counting cable. Contributions poured into his office, which had its own ZIP code. It is estimated that in 1986 the money flowed in at the rate of about half a million dollars a day. " [This is obviously an exaggerated figure.]
Jingu-kyo Japan - - - - 1872 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 71. "Jingu-kyo: A religious and educational organisation founded in 1872 attached to the Ise Jingu. It acquired the status of a Shinto sect during the Meiji period but is not counted among the thirteen 'Sect Shinto' groups... It was dissolved in September 1899 to be reclassified as a secular organisation, the Jingu Hosai-kai (Ise Shrine Offering Association). It was later renamed the Tokyo-dai-jingu. "
Jinja Honcho Japan 58,511,648 - 78,986
units
- 1970 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 75-76. "In 1993-4 the official Yearbook of Religions (shukyo nenkan) gave the following statistics for incorporated shrines and individuals affiliated with Jinja Honcho [1970 figures are given in square brackets for comparison]. Shrines - 79,173 [78,986]. 'Kyoshi' (a loose term for 'clergy'...) - 20,336 [17,011]. 'Believers' - 82,631,196 [58,511,647]. "
Jinja Honcho Japan 82,631,200 68.86% 79,173
units
- 1994 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 75-76. "Jinja Honcho: Usually translated into English as 'The Association of Shinto Shrines' or 'The Shrine Association', Jinja Honcho is the present co-ordinating or governing body for most of 'shrine Shinto'... In 1993-4 the official Yearbook of Religions (shukyo nenkan) gave the following statistics for incorporated shrines and individuals affiliated with Jinja Honcho [1970 figures are given in square brackets for comparison]. Shrines - 79,173 [78,986]. 'Kyoshi' (a loose term for 'clergy'...) - 20,336 [17,011]. 'Believers' - 82,631,196 [58,511,647]. It should be remembered that most of Jinja Honcho's 'Shinto' believers will also be among the 88 million or so who identify themselves in surveys as 'Buddhist' believers in a total population of ca.120 million. "
Jinja Honcho - clergy Japan 17,011 - - - 1970 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 75-76. "In 1993-4 the official Yearbook of Religions (shukyo nenkan) gave the following statistics for incorporated shrines and individuals affiliated with Jinja Honcho [1970 figures are given in square brackets for comparison]. Shrines - 79,173 [78,986]. 'Kyoshi' (a loose term for 'clergy'...) - 20,336 [17,011]. 'Believers' - 82,631,196 [58,511,647]. "
Jinja Honcho - clergy Japan 20,336 0.02% - - 1994 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 75-76. "In 1993-4 the official Yearbook of Religions (shukyo nenkan) gave the following statistics for incorporated shrines and individuals affiliated with Jinja Honcho... Shrines - 79,173... 'Kyoshi' (a loose term for 'clergy'...) - 20,336... 'Believers' - 82,631,196... total Japanese population of ca.120 million. "
Jivaro Peru - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "
Jivaro South America 30,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 268-269. "Jivaro: Location: Ecuador; Peru (Eastern slopes of the Andes mountains); Population: 10,000 - 30,000; Language: Jivaro; Quechua; Religion: Traditional mystical and spiritual beliefs "; "The Jivaro belong to a spiritual and mystical world. The Jivaro hold a deep-rooted belief that spiritual forces all around them are responsible for real-world occurrences... Many daily customs and behaviors are guided by their desire to attain spiritual power or avoid evil spirits... There are a great many deities or gods that the Jivaro revere... "
Jivaro world 20,000 - - 2
countries
1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 198. "The South American Jivaros are world-famous for one product that they have provided for the international market: shrunken human heads... The Jivaro culture is dwindling today... However, there are still many Jivaros, or Jibaros, as they are called in Spanish, who today live deep in the Amazon rain forests of southeastern Ecuador and northern Peru. Their total population is estimated to be fifteen to twenty thousand. They are divided into five separate groups, generally antagonistic toward each other. Customs and institutions vary slightly among the different groups. "
Joachimism world - - - - 1202 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "JOACHIM OF FIORE (1132-1202): on a PILGRIMAGE to Jerusalem, he experienced a religious CONVERSION and later entered the CISTERCIAN ORDER. After a short spell as ABBOT of Corazzo, he resigned to devote himself to APOCALYPTIC writings which develop an elaborate interpretation of HISTORY involving three great stages based on the persons of the TRINITY. Although he said little about the third phase, or age of the SPIRIT, except that it would see the rise of new religious Orders which would CONVERT the whole world, it became the focus of speculation in the movement known as JOACHIMISM. The spiritual FRANCISCANS, various PROTESTANT groups and in recent times NEW AGE movements, have all been influenced by his work.; JOACHIMISM: a medieval APOCALYPTIC movement which developed a forward looking eschatology anticipating the Age of the Spirit based on the works of JOACHIM OF FIORE. "
Jodo Japan - - - - 1175 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 163. "Jodo-shu: Jap., lit. 'School of the Pure Land'; school of Japanese Buddhism derived from the Pure Land school of China. The Jodo-shu was brought to Japan, along with other Buddhist teachings, by the monk Ennin (793-864)... Important representatives... were Kuya (942-1017). In their time recitation of Amida's name was a component of the practice of all Buddhist schools, especially of the Tendai and Shingon schools. In the 12th century Honen (1133-1212) founded the actual Jodo school... He succeeded in assembling a great host of followers around him & forming them into a powerful organization. "
Jodo Japan 3,646,000 - 8,245
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 105. "Pure Land School [of Buddhism]:... Minor differences exist in the four Japanese sects of Jodo (8,245 temples & 3,646,000 adherents), Shin (19,815 & 13,327,000), Yuzenembutsu (357 & 153,000), and Ji (494 & 350,000). "
Jodo Japan 2,960,000 - - - 1956 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969). [Orig. source: Morgan, Kenneth W. (ed.), The Path of the Buddha; New York: The Ronald Press Co. (1956), pg. 332-333.]; pg. 275. "Today Pure Land Buddhists number some 18,500,000 adherents. Of these, 77 percent are Shin and 16 percent are Jodo, with the rest spread over several smaller groups. "
Jodo Japan - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 284. "The single most popular sect [of Buddhism Japan] is Jodo Shinshu, founded by Shinran... About half of the Japanese Buddhists belong to either Jodo Shinshu, or to Jodo, another form of Amidaism established by Honen... "
Jodo Shinshu Japan - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 537. "Next to Jodo Shin-shu (see Pure Land Sects) Nichiren Buddhism has the largest constituency of all religions in Japan today. "
Jodo Shinshu Japan - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 163. "Jodo-shin-shu: Jap., lit. 'True School of the Pure Land' [distinct from Jodo-shu ('School of the Pure Land')]. The short form is Shin-shu (Shin school). A school of Japanese Buddhism that was founded by Shinran (1173-1262) but first organized as a school by Rennyo (1414-99)... The Jodo-shin-shu has no monastic aspect; it is purely a lay community... Today the Jodo-shin-shu is the most important school of Buddhism in Japan and consists of 2 factions: Otani & Honganji. The main temples... are in Kyoto. This division took place in the 17th century... Both factions maintain large universities. "
Jodo Shinshu Japan - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996). Chapter: Buddhism; pg. 125. "Honen was followed by a disciple named Shinran (1173-1262), whose Jodo Shin ('True Pure Land') sect eschews monasticism, although its leadership is hereditary... Jodo Shin is the leading school of Buddhism in Japan today, with no religious rules whatever that distinguish its members from ordinary folk. Its two main subschools are Otani and Honganji. "
Jodo Shinshu Japan - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 284. "The single most popular sect [of Buddhism Japan] is Jodo Shinshu, founded by Shinran... About half of the Japanese Buddhists belong to either Jodo Shinshu, or to Jodo, another form of Amidaism established by Honen... "
Jodo Shinshu USA 100,000 - - - 1970 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 1050-1051. "... Jodo Shinshu school founded by Shinran Shonin in the twelfth century and now the most widespread form of Buddhism in Japan... by 1970 it had a[n American] membership of about one hundred thousand served by eighty active ministers... "
Johannische Kirche Germany 3,300 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Johannische Kirche " in table. Source: REMID.
John Birch Society USA - - - - 1958 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 169. "After the demise of the Second Red Scare, many of the fears that had fueled it remained powerful in the minds of a few. In 1958 Massachusetts candy-maker Robert Welch founded the John Birch Society, an extremist organization that saw Communist conspiracy almost everywhere (including in the Eisenhower Administration). Fundamentalist preacher Billy James Hargis and his Christian Crusade, and Australian evangelist Fred Schwartz and the Christian Anti-Communist Crusade were in the same ideological camp. "
John Brown Anti-Klan Committee USA - - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 135-136. "Other Left-Wing Activity. Although only fringe, fragmented organizations, several other left-wing extremist groups still exist:

...John Brown Anti-Klan Committee (JBAKC). Based in New York, JBAKC sounds like a valid organization committed to fighting the Ku Klux Klan, but according to the Anti-Defamation League... it 'actually promotes racism and advocates organized violence.' With chapters in thirteen states, JBAKC is thought to be a front for the May 19th Communist Organization and also works in collaboration with NAPO. Though fighting Klan activities, it supports 'the struggle to free the Black Nation' and also . . .

calls for independence for other 'oppressed nations' including Mexicans, Puerto Ricans... and it supports the use of violence to achieve these goals. The JBAKC's basic premise is that the Ku Klux Klan is a paramilitary branch of the American government... considerably expands the meaning of [its] slogan 'Death to the Klan.'
"
Joint Christian Services International Mongolia - - 40
units
- 1992 *LINK* "Asia " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Mongolia... In 1992, SIM became one of the eight founding member agencies to form the Joint Christian Services International, a development and secondment consortium that ministers in creative ways to the people of Mongolia. There are now about 40 registered churches in the country. "
Joint Christian Services International Mongolia - - - - 1992 *LINK* "Asia " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Mongolia... In 1992, SIM became one of the eight founding member agencies to form the Joint Christian Services International, a development and secondment consortium that ministers in creative ways to the people of Mongolia. There are now about 40 registered churches in the country. "
Jojitsu China - - - - 510 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 308. "Satyasiddhi school - Skt. (Chin., Ch'eng-shih; Jap., Jojitsu), lit. 'School of the Perfection of Truth'); school of Chinese Buddhism based on the Indian Sautrantikas... Important representatives of this school were Seng-t'ao & Seng-sung, both students of Kamarajiva, who spread the teaching of the Satyasiddhi school throughout China. As a result, by the beginning of the 6th cen. it was one of the most important Buddhist schools in the country. It stood in opposition to the San-lun school... attacks by Chi-tsang & Fa-lang, 2 important representatives of the San-lun school, finally led to a decrease of interest in the Satyasiddhi school... In the 7th cen. the Satyasiddhi school was brought to Japan by a Korean monk, where, however, it continued only as a part of the Sanron school, the Japanese form of the San-lun. "
Jojitsu Japan - - - - 624 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996). Chapter: Buddhism; pg. 122. "By the Nara period (710-94), six schools had been brought over from China: Sanron and Jojitsu (both established in 624), Hosso (654), Kusha (658), Kegon (736), and Ritsu (754); Jojitsu, Kusha, and Ritsu were Hinayana, the other three Mahayana. Of the six, only Hosso, Kegon, and Ritsu have survived in modern Japan, and these have only historical significance and slight membership. "
Jojitsu Japan - - - - 625 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 164. "Jojitsu school: Jap., lit. 'School of the Perfection of Truth'; name of the Japanese branch of the Satyasiddhi school. This teaching was brought to Japan in 625 by Ekwan, a Korean monk who had studied this school in China. Since then, this teaching has been studied in Japan by students of many Buddhist leanings but never regarded as an independent school, rather as part of the Sanron school. "
Jojitsu Japan - - - - 784 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 524. "The six Nara Buddhist schools. Six scholarly disciplines were pursued by a small number of monks at designated home temples in Nara. They were extensions of Chinese scholarship... Kusha... Jojitsu (Chin.: Ch'eng-shih; Skt.: Satyasiddhi) school. A Hinayana tradition of the Sautrantika branch joining the [Kusha] 'realist' analysis of phenomena to the Mahayana doctrine of a pervasive emptiness (Sunyata)... Sanron... Hosso... Kegon... Ritsu... "
Jola Gambia - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Jola Gambia 112,000 8.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 44. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Jon Frum movement Vanuatu - - - - 1998 Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. "Religion " in The Future Now: Predicting the 21st Century. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1998); pg. 64. "A similar cargo-cult on Vanuatu, the 'Jon Frum' movement, first appeared in the 1930s and periodically resurfaces to this day, exciting expectations of the return of the messianic Jon Frum to distribute cargo, drive out the whites and restore a religion of...excess. "
Jon Frum movement Vanuatu - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 593. "The predominant religion of the Ni-Vanuatu is Christianity. However, a large number of Ni-Vanuatu still practice traditional, indigenous religion and there are certain cargo cults on the islands. The most well-known of those is the John Frum movement that started in the 1930s. The John Frum movement exists in opposition to the Christian church and its followers often see it as a way to better their material lives. The message of the John Frum movement has been to maintain the traditional ways of life that the Christian church tried to abolish, such as kava drinking, traditional dancing, and other behaviors that were viewed as 'pagan' by church authorities. "
Jonaam Uganda - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Jonaam world - - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; "Zaire, Uganda "
Jonaam Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Jordan Baptist Convention Jordan 1,000 - 12
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Josephite Fathers Maryland: Baltimore - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 132-134. "Creoles: Location: United States (Louisiana; Texas); Religion: Roman Catholicism; some local sects "; "The majority of Creoles are Catholics, making up the largest per capita black Catholic population in the United States. Besides various local sects, the Josephite Fathers, based in Baltimore, are especially active in the Creole churches of Louisiana. "
Juaneno North America - Pacific Coast 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Juaneño "
Juaneno world 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Juaneño "
Juche Korea, North - - - - 1977 Gascoigne, Bamber. The Christians; New York: William Morrow & Co. (1977); pg. 290. "In one poster of the thirties Stalin was to be seen smiling benevolently in the night sky above the Kremlin. Marx would no doubt have been horrified to see his face mounted on gigantic placards beside Stalin or Mao, but in North Korea--where the cult of personality has been carried to its furthest extremes--Marx, Engels & Lenin have all been dropped from the pantheon. The theoretical basis of the creed is now referred to not as Marxism but Kimilsungism, and Kim Il Sung appears alone on the hoardings. It is arguable that all Communist countries have merely replaced old gods with new, but so far only North Korea has achieved monotheism. "
Juche Korea, North 23,000,000 100.00% - - 1999 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 1. "...Juche's approximately 23 million adherents... "
Juche Korea, North 23,000,000 - - - 1999 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 88. "...many casual observers of North Korea draw improper conclusions by applying a Western cultural paradigm that separates the political from the religious. Such a concept is totally foreign to the Juche mindset shared by 23 million Koreans. "
Juche Korea, North - - - - 1999 Nash, Amy K. North Korea (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 96. "Now the Dear Leader has taken command. Kim Jong Il had long been groomed to succeed his father, and when Kim Il Sung died in July 1994 Korea became the first historical instance of a Communist monarchy... The country now also officially worships Kim Jong Il. Homes throughout the country have framed photographs of both men and copies of their written works. The people are told that Kim Jong Il was born on Mount Paekdu like a mythic god, instead of in Siberia as Western analysts contend. Criticism of Kim Jong Il, even in private, is likely to meet with swift punishment. "
Juche Korea, North - - - - 1999 Nash, Amy K. North Korea (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 96. "The Cult of Kim and Chuche [Juche]... In many ways, the North Korean people worshiped Kim Il Sung [who died in 1994] as a god. His countrypeople called him the 'Great Leader' and his son, Kim Jong Il, the 'Dear Leader.' Children were taught from an early age to honor the Great Leader as the heroic father-figure who would protect them from outside evils. Even after his death, Kim Il Sung commands great reverence among the people. His huge memorial in Pyongyan receives thousands of mourners daily who pay their respects and lay wreaths. "
Juche Korea, North - - - - 1999 Nash, Amy K. North Korea (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 96-97. "Kim Il Sung constructed his own brand of Communist thought, called chuche sasang, which means self-reliance. From the start, Kim used chuche to rule the country, and it blossomed into the state political ideology when Kim declared North Korea's independence from Soviet and Chinese political influence in the 1960s... Chuche takes the theories of Karl Marx and of V.I. Lenin and applies them to the particular circumstances of North Korea... "
Juche world 23,000,000 - - 1
country
1999 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 1. "Welcome to Juche, the world's 'newest' major religion. If you have never heard of Juche before, you are not alone. Few people outside of North Korea have. Most general volumes on world religions mistakenly state that North Korea is a 'Marxist-Leninist dictatorship' where religious practices are virtually non-existent. Any such notion falls widely short of reality. In fact, Juche's approximately 23 million adherents, who worship their former and current dictators, outnumber those of more well-known world religions such as Judaism, Sikhism, Jainism, Bahaism, and Zoroastrianism. "
Judaism Afghanistan 32,000 - - - 1959 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990); pg. 209. "The Jewish community in Afghanistan numbered 32,000 before the 1960s, living mainly in Kabul, Heart, and Balkh. "
Judaism Africa 219,000 - - - 1800 Breuilly, Elizabeth, et al. Religions of the World: The Illustrated Guide to Origins, Beliefs, Traditions & Festivals. Facts on File Inc.: New York, NY (1997); pg. 41. 1800 Chart and accompanying text: "In 1800 there were approximately 3 million Jews worldwide, distributed as shown below... These numbers represent individuals who have identified themselves as being religious Jews. "; 7.3% of 3 million.
Judaism Africa 176,400 - - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983). [Source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 433. Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Judaism Africa 174,000 - - - 1981 Unterman, Alan. "Judaism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 25. Map: "Figure 1.4: Main centres of Jewish population, 1981 "
Judaism Africa 176,900 0.04% - - 1982 Robertson, Ian. Sociology (2nd ed.); New York, NY: Worth Publishers (1981 2nd edition; updated since 1977 1st ed.). [Orig. source: Encyclopaedia Britannica Book of the Year, 1982]; pg. 405. Table: "Estimated membership of the principal religions of the world "
Judaism Africa 153,600 - - - 1993 O'Brien, J. & M. Palmer. The State of Religion Atlas. Simon & Schuster: New York (1993); pg. 28-29. 1.2% of 12.8 million total world Jews.
Judaism Africa 163,000 0.02% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Judaism Africa 165,000 0.02% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Judaism Africa 337,000 0.05% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "The Geography of Religion Website " (assembled by the students of Morehead State University, under Prof. Timothy C. Pitts); web page: "The Geography of Judaism " (viewed 2 March 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers (1996), pp. 356-357.] table with 3 columns: "Area "; "Adherents "; "Population Percentage "


Judaism, continued

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