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Index

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Arya Samaj, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Arya Samaj USA - - 20
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Global Directory: Directory of Arya Samaj in United States of America " (viewed 24 Jan. 1999) counted listings in directory
Arya Samaj world 500,000 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 40. "A modern reform movement in Hinduism followed by Dyananda Sarasvati in 1875... The Arya Samaj has about a half-million followers at present, nearly a hundred times the membership of the Brahma-Samaj from which Dyananda borrowed... "
Arya Samaj world - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "new sects and movements in Hinduism both in India and the West, for example, the Sri Aurobindo Ashram, the Theosophical Society, Arya Samaj, Brahmo Samaj, Ananda Marga, Transcendental Meditation... "
Arya Samaj world - - - 20
countries
1998 *LINK* official web site of Arya Samaj; web page: "Introduction to Arya Samaj " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) Hindu:Arya Sama:
United States, Canada, Guyana, Surinam, Trinidad, Mexico, United Kingdom, Netherlands, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, South Africa, Malawi, Mauritius, Pakistan, Burma, Thailand, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Australia
Arya Samaj world - - 77
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Global Directory: Directory of Arya Samaj " (viewed 24 Jan. 1999) counted listings in directory
Aryan Asia - - - - -1500 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 64. "Aryan. A powerful group of Indo-European-speaking people who spread through Iran and Northern India in the first half of the second millennium B.C. Aryan is also the name given to the group of languages descended from the one spoken by this group, the modern representations of which include Farsi, Hindi, Urdu, Bengali, Marathi, Gujerati, and others... After the Aryans had settled in Iran for several centuries, a major cultural split occurred around 1500 B.C., resulting in the migration of a large subgroup through Afghanistan into India... Modern Hinduism is an especially interesting product of Aryan and Dravidian mutual assimilation. "
Aryan India - - - - -1100 B.C.E. Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998); pg. 19. "Hindus. Over three thousand years ago, a wandering Aryan tribe settled on the banks of the Indus River (in modern-day India) and... "
Aryan Brotherhood USA - - - - 1993 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 58. "The Aryan Brotherhood, a white-supremacist prison organization, has strong ties to the Aryan Nations. According to the U.S. Justice Department, the Brotherhood has existed in federal and state prisons in Arizona, California, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, and Oklahoma. "
Aryan Nations Idaho - - - - 1993 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 56. "Among the groups which embody [Christian] Identity principles is the Aryan Nations. Based in Idaho's panhandle, this neo-Nazi group claims to represent the 'real' America, as it offers followers a unique blend of bigotry and biblical interpretation. The group's founder and leader is Reverend Richard Butler, pastor of the Church of Jesus Christ Christian... Butler and a number of his followers then relocated [from California] to a twenty-acre stretch of wooded land near Hayden Lake, Idaho, where they formed the Aryan Nations. "; Pg. 58: "...Aryan Nations has reached out to other organizations to form broad-based white-supremacist affiliations. International congresses held at Hayden Lake drew followers of more than a dozen white-supremacist groups... "
Aryan Nations USA 500 - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 65. [Chapter: Extremists of the "Religious " Far Right] The Aryan Nations... The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith estiamtes that the Aryan Nations now has a membership of no more than 500... "
Aryan Nations USA - - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 65. "The Aryan Nations... uppermost corner of Idaho's panhandle... logging hamlet of Hayden Lake... international headquarters of the Aryan Nations, a far-right pseudo-religious militant organization dedicated to establishign a separate, self-governing all-Aryan kingdom (meaning whites only) in the Pacific Northwest. Its founder and spiritual leader is Richard G. Butler, that is, 'Rev.' Butler of the Church of Jesus Christ Christian... Every summer, Butler invites an assortment of like-minded people... for the 'Aryan Nations World Congress.'... attract many Identity followers, they also draw in hard-core Klansmen, young and old neo-Nazis... In 1987, however, Idaho passed some of the nation's harshest laws against paramilitary training... and against racial and religious harrassment. These new laws have lowered attendance; only several hundred people showed up for the 1986 and 1987 hate holidays, reportedly half the attendance of 1982. "
Aryan Nations world 500 - - - 1994 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 30. "One of Christian Identity's strongest supporters is Richard Butler. Butler founded Aryan Nations as a nonreligious branch of Christian Identity. Aryan Nations is headquartered in Hayden Lake, Idaho. The group claims about five hundred members. "
Aryan Warriors Nevada - - - - 1993 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 58. "The Aryan Brotherhood, a white-supremacist prison organization, has strong ties to the Aryan Nations... A similar gang, known as the Aryan Warriors, has been active within the Nevada prison system. "
Asatru Sweden - - - - 800 C.E. Zickgraf, Ralph. Sweden (series: Places and Peoples of the World). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1988); pg. 65. "Christians considered the Vikings pagans, because they worshipped many gods. The chief Viking god was Odin, known as father of the gods and the god of the hanged... Thor was the god of war, whose hammer gave forth lightning, and Frew was the god of fertility... "
Asatru Utah 3 - 1
unit
- 1990 *LINK* Mims, Bob. "Battling Toward Valhalla: Practitioners of Asatru celebrate life in the way of the ancient Vikings " in Salt Lake Tribune (Saturday, January 30, 1999). "Parker, who has seen Asatru in Utah grow to four kindreds [congregations] and 50 adherents since he launched his Eagle's Kindred with two other believers in 1993... "
Asatru Utah 50 - 4
units
- 1999 *LINK* Mims, Bob. "Battling Toward Valhalla: Practitioners of Asatru celebrate life in the way of the ancient Vikings " in Salt Lake Tribune (Saturday, January 30, 1999). "Parker, who has seen Asatru in Utah grow to four kindreds [congregations] and 50 adherents since he launched his Eagle's Kindred with two other believers in 1993... admits his beliefs today represent 'quite a transition' from his fundamentalist Baptist upbringing. "
Asbury Bible Churches world - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 187. "Asbury Bible Churches... Dublin, GA [H.Q.]... The Asbury Bible Church parallels the John Wesley Fellowship in most ways, but is organizationally separate. Like the John Wesley Fellowship, the Asbury Bible Churches were organized in 1971 by former members of the Southern Methodist Church who withdrew when that church dropped its membership in the American Council of Christian Churches. They follow the same conservative interpretation of Wesleyan doctrine and loose congregational polity and draw on the Francis Asbury Society of Ministers for their pastors. The Churches are also members of the American Council of Christian Churches. Membership: Not reported. "
Ashaninka South America 45,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 60-61. "Ashaninka: Alternate names: Campa (derogatory); Location: Peru, Brazil; Population: 45,000; Religion: Native mythical beliefs "; "The Ashaninka cosmovision is mainly mythical. There is not a figure of a creator but a hero, Avireri, who transformed humans into animals, plants, mountains, and rivers... Throughout their history, the Ashaninka have had an apocalyptic vision of the world. They believe that this world is plagued by evil forces and people will be destroyed, and then there will be a new world with new people without sickness or death. "
Ashanti Ghana - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter: Drums; pg. 725-726. "The religion of the Ashanti in Ghana lays great emphasis on drumming during public worship. "; "The dance mode of drumming is equally important in Ashanti religious practice, for the dance is a form of dramatic expression... Hence for the Ashanti it is a vital element of worship... "
Ashanti world 1,000,000 - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 15, 23. "Ashanti: Population: 1,000,000; Location: Ghana and the Ivory Coast; Language: Twi "; Pg. 23: "Many Ashanti crafts reflect the importance of religion and religious ritual in Ashanti life. The worship of the spirits of the dead is the most important expression of religious faith, followed by worship of the golden stool [a symbol of the divine throne], the spirit not only of Ashanti union but also of the entire Ashanti people. "
Ashkenazi Judaism Israel 1,500,000 - - - 1984 Unterman, Alan. "Judaism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 21. "The majority of Jews in [the USA] and approximately half of the [3 million] Jews in the latter [Israel] are Ashkenazi Jews of central or eastern European origin who share a religious subculture with Yiddish as its lingua franca. "
Ashkenazi Judaism Israel 935,000 21.25% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Israel ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 38-39. "Jews now make up about 85% of Israel's 4.4 million people... Nearly 50% of Israel's Jews were born in the country. Another 25% were born in Europe and are referred to as Ashkenazim, or European Jews. "
Ashkenazi Judaism world 9,900,000 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 41. "Ashkenazim... constitute more than ninety per cent of all Jews. " [Other source: Anderson's "The World's Religions " states 11,000,000 in Judaism in 1945; 11,000,000 * 90% = 9,900,000]
Ashkenazi Judaism world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 68-69. "Ashkenazim. Jews whose ancestry lay in North, Central or Eastern Europe, as distinct from Sephardim of Spain and North Africa... Scholars disagree about Ashkenazic origins. The prevailing theory is that Mediterranean Jews were invited by Charlemagne to settle Germanic territories (ca. 800), and a steady emigration followed. These gradually moved eastward to Poland, particularly after Luther's efforts to expel Jews from the Germanic states. By 1600 Poland became world Jewry's primary population center. Immigration to the U.S. in the 19th and 20th centuries transformed it into an Ashkenazic center despite its early communities of Spanish Jews... survivors today live primarily in North Amber, Israel, and the U.S.S.R. Smaller settlements are found in South America, Britain, Scandinavia, Australia, and South Africa. "
Ashkenazi Judaism world 11,600,000 - - - 1982 Charing, Douglas. The Jewish World. London, UK: Silver Burdett Co. (1983); pg. 14. "There are 2 main groups in world Jewry: the Ashkenasim, and the Sephardim. The word 'Ashkenasim' comes from the Hebrew word for Germany, and describes the Jews who lived in France and Germany, and who fled from persecution to Poland, Russia and parts of central Europe. Before 1933 they made up 90% of the world's Jews, but now the figure is nearer 80%. "; Graphic: "...1982. There are about 14.5 million Jews in the world now, which represents less than 1/2% of the world's population. "
Ashkenazi Judaism world - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 273. "Ashkenazi: Literally means 'German'. Originally referred to Jews who lived in medieval Germany, and those who, as a result of persecution, spread from there to other parts of Europe. They had a distinctive culture based on the Yiddish language. In the 19th and early 20th centuries many of these Jews immigrated to North and South America, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Today the word is widely taken to mean reference to Jews of German and East European descent. "
Ashkenazi Judaism world 9,800,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 132. "The Sephardi-Ashkenzai division still exists to a lesser degree in Jewish life today, with Ashkenazim forming more than 70 percent of the Jews in the world...differences... have now faded, but many distinctive customs and traditions still persist. "
Ashkenazi Judaism world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Judaism; pg. 262. "Ashkenazim: Jewry from Eastern Europe, especially Germany, the largest of the two major divisions of the Jewish community, the other being the Sephardim. Many of them spoke Yiddish. "
Ashkenazi Judaism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 10. "Ashkenazim: Jews whose ancestors lived in the Middle Ages in Germany and the surrounding countries, as distinct from those with a Spanish or oriental ancestry, the Sephardim. The name Ashkenaz in the Bible (Genesis 10:3) was identified in the Middle Ages with Germany, hence Ashkenazim, 'Germans'. There are no doctrinal divisions between Ashkenazim and Sephardim abut each community preserves its own traditions. "
Ashurism Assyria - 0.00% - - 256 C.E. *LINK* web site: "Assyria Online! "; web page: "Brief History of the Asyrians " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999), by Peter BetBasoo. "Assyria is located in north Mesopotamia and spans four countries: In Syria it extends west to the Euphrates river; in Turkey it extends north to Harran, Edessa, Diyarbakir, and Lake Van; in Iran it extends east to Lake Urmi, and in Iraq it extends to about 100 miles south of Kirkuk. "; "Assyrians have practiced two religions throughout their history: Ashurism and Christianity. Ashurism was, of course, the first religion of the Assyrians. The very word Assyrian, in its Latin form, derives from the name of Ashur, the Assyrian god. Assyrians continued to practice Ashurism until 256 A.D, although by that time, most Assyrians had accepted Christianity. "
Asmat Indonesia 65,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 52. "Asmat: Location: Indonesian province of Irian Jaya on the island of New Guinea; Population: Approximately 65,000; Religion: Christianity; Asmat religion based on spirit worship "; "The Asmat are a Melanesian, or Papuan, people... "; "Prior to the introduction of Christianity into the territory, the Asmat religion was based on a belief in spirits which inhabited things in the natural world... "; [NOTE: This is a measure of cultural/ethnic affiliation, NOT how many practice traditional Asmat religion.]
Asociacion Bautista de El Salvador El Salvador 5,402 - 61
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Asociacion Convencion Bautista de Costa Rica Costa Rica 1,984 - 22
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Asociacion Convencion de Iglesias Menonitas de Costa Rica Costa Rica 1,800 - 28
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " COSTA RICA: Asociacion Convencion de Iglesias Menonitas de Costa Rica; Members: 1,800+/-; Congregations: 25
Asociacion de Iglesias Hermanos Menonitas de Colombia Colombia 1,600 - 30
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " COLOMBIA: Asociacion de Iglesias Hermanos Menonitas de Colombia; Members: 1,600; Congregations: 30
Assam Baptist Convention India 24,360 - 266
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Assassins Asia - - - - 1100 C.E. Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 34-35. "The Assassins were a small breakaway group of Shia Muslims that began in Persia late in the eleventh century under the leadership of Hasan bin Sabbah. In 1090, Hasan and his followers captured the great and nearly impregnable fortress of Alamut, or Eagle's Nest. From there his influence spread through large portions of what is now Iran, Iraq, and Syria. "
Assassins Asia - - - - 1272 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "ASSASSINS: the European name for members of a minor branch of the ISMAILI branch of ISLAM... they were associated with Syria... As a movement they were suppressed by the Mongols between 1256 and 1272. "
Assassins India 250,000 - - - 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969); pg. 469. "Another, similar group of Ismailites were the Assassins of Alamut of Persia... Today some twenty thousand Assassins survive as a peaceful sect, living in the mountains of Lebanon. Another 250,000 live in India. "
Assassins Iraq - - - - 1200 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1472. "Ismailis... the Fatimid rulers of Egypt from the 10th century were Ismailis and so were the Assassins... of Persia and Syria in the 12th and 13th centuries... "
Assassins Lebanon 20,000 - - - 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969); pg. 469. "Another, similar group of Ismailites were the Assassins of Alamut of Persia... Today some twenty thousand Assassins survive as a peaceful sect, living in the mountains of Lebanon. Another 250,000 live in India. "
Assassins Middle East - - - - 1300 C.E. Wright, Robin. Sacred Rage: The Crusade of Modern Islam. New York: Linden Press/Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 41. "The Assassins' sect remained a potent force in the Middle East for two centuries, establishing a network of Assassin fortresses in Iran, Iraq, Syria and what is today Lebanon, until conquering Mongold eventually pushed the Assassins into obscurity. "
Assassins Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 215. "'Assassins': An Ismaili movement spread in the 11th century in the mountains of northern Iran around the fortress of Alamut by Husan-I Sabbah. He intimidated his enemies with political assassinations, often carried out by his followers... Disputed successions in the 12th century meant that the Assassins largely disappeared, but today there are still supporters of rival claimants: the Nizaris who support the claims of Nizar; and the Tayyibis who support Tayyib. "
Assassins Syria - - - - 1200 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1472. "Ismailis... the Fatimid rulers of Egypt from the 10th century were Ismailis and so were the Assassins... of Persia and Syria in the 12th and 13th centuries... "
Assassins world - - - - 909 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 636. "Dissemination of the Sab'iyya [Sevener] doctrines in different parts of the Muslim world resulted in the appearance of the revolutionary governments of the Qarmatians, Fatimids, Assassins, and other Ismaili groups. "
Assassins world - - - - 1272 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 69. "Assassins. The name given in medieval times by Europeans to the followers of the Nizari branch of the Isma'iliyya sect of Shi'ism. It was used first in Syria, then extended to include the Persian branch of the sect... The history of the Nizaris begins with Hasan-i Sabbah, who seized the key fortress of Alamut, south of the Caspian in A.D. 1090... Their downfall in Iran and in Syria was effected by the Monguls in 1256 and 1258, and the Mamluk Sultan Baybars deal the Assassins of Syria a final blow in 1272. "
Assassins world 270,000 - - - 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969); pg. 469. "Another, similar group of Ismailites were the Assassins of Alamut of Persia... Today some twenty thousand Assassins survive as a peaceful sect, living in the mountains of Lebanon. Another 250,000 live in India. "
Assembleias de Deus Brazil 4,000,000 - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 133. "Of the total of about 30 million adherents of Pentecostal Churches, the largest number in any one country is in Brazil where one Church alone, the Assembleias de Deus, counts four million members, and where the Igreja Evangelica Pentecostal -- a member-Church of the World Council of Churches -- counts one million. "
Assembleias de Deus Brazil 15,000,000 - - - 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 161-162. "...Assembleia de Deus, a Brazilian pentecostal denomination with ties to the Assemblies of God, a worldwide org. with its headquarters in Springfield, Missouri... Assembleia de Deus. This denomination spread with breathtaking rapidity to every state & region in the country, & now claims somewhere between 11 and 15 million Brazilian members. "
Assembleias de Deus Brazil 13,000,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* Nascimento, Elma Lia. "Praise the Lord and pass the catch-up ", "news from Brazil, November 1995; dateline: Brazzil ". (viewed 30 July 1999, web site: RickRoss.com) "Even today the Universal is not the biggest evangelical church in Brazil. The Assembleia de Deu (Assembly of God), for example, has 13 million followers and the Congregation Cristo do Brasil (Brazil's Christian Congregation) and the Igreja Luteran (Lutheran Church) have 4 million apiece. "
Assemblies of God Alabama 53,228 1.32% 372
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 38,442. [Listed as 'Assemblies of God.']
Assemblies of God Alabama - 1.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Assemblies of God Alabama - 0.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Assemblies of God "; Actual % between 0 and 0.5%, so sell was left blank.
Assemblies of God Alaska 8,779 1.60% 85
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 4,904. [Listed as 'Assemblies of God.']
Assemblies of God Arizona 49,962 1.36% 218
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 30,468. [Listed as 'Assemblies of God.']
Assemblies of God Arizona - 0.40% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Assemblies of God Arizona - 0.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Assemblies of God "; Actual % between 0 and 0.5%, so sell was left blank.
Assemblies of God Arkansas 55,438 2.24% 434
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 32,156. [Listed as 'Assemblies of God.']
Assemblies of God Arkansas - 1.50% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Assemblies of God Arkansas - 3.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Assemblies of God "
Assemblies of God Australia 61,763 0.35% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census.
Assemblies of God Botswana 3,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site; (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) African Independent Churches (16) 5%. Protestants 26%. Community 172,000. Denominations 16. Largest -Congregational (LMS) 20,000. Lutheran 50,000; Dutch Reformed Church in Africa (DRC) 21,000; Assemblies of God 3,000; Baptists 800. Evangelicals 3%.
Assemblies of God Brazil 15,000,000 - - - 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 161-162. "...Assembleia de Deus, a Brazilian pentecostal denomination with ties to the Assemblies of God, a worldwide org. with its headquarters in Springfield, Missouri... Assembleia de Deus. This denomination spread with breathtaking rapidity to every state & region in the country, & now claims somewhere between 11 and 15 million Brazilian members. "
Assemblies of God Brazil 8,000,000 - - - 2000 *LINK* "The church is larger than you think " in DAWN Fridayfax 1998 #28. (Original source: Patrick Johnstone. "The Church is bigger than you think ", WEC, Bulstrode, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, U.K.) "Even according to conservative estimates, in which enthusiastic exaggerations of membership numbers such as that of the Assemblies of God were corrected from 16 to 8 million, there are more evangelical Christians in Brazil than in all of Europe "
Assemblies of God California 263,059 0.88% 1,123
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 157,872. [Listed as 'Assemblies of God.']


Assemblies of God, continued

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