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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Islam, Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo)

Islam, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Islam Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) - 1.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
Islam Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) 4,649,854 10.00% - - 1998 *LINK* official government web site of Democratic Republic of Congo (former Zaire) Religions : Catholiques romains 50% ; Protestants 20% ; Kimbanguistes 10% ; Musulmans 10% ; autres 10%; [Total] Population : 46.498.539 (estimation)
Islam Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) 700,000 1.40% - - 2000 K. F. Bin Mohd Noor. "Muslims Statistics... for Year 2000 " [orig. src: Barrett. World Christian Encyclopedia, 1982] Table; Listed in table simply as 'Zaire'
Islam Zambia 700,000 15.00% - - 1986 *LINK* Web site: "Arabic Paper "; web page: "Muslim Countries of the World " (viewed 15 June 1999). [Written 1998.] [NOTE: Questionable statistical methodology.] "In 1986... Muslim Education Trust organization [U.K.] obtained... 1971 census & [info. from] Embassies of the respective countires... 1971 census showed the Muslim Minorities countries had around 308 Million Muslim.. "; "...add (784.5M [independent Muslim countries]+ 308M) = 1092.5 Million Muslims in 1971 "; Table shows country, "population " [number of Muslims in the country], & % Muslim. Total adds up to 317,391,000, so these figures are apparently intended to be estimates for 1986.
Islam Zambia 92,000 1.00% - - 1994 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Southern Africa (PCSA) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate):.. Zambia: 9.2 million... Zambia: Christianity (63%). Indigenous beliefs (36%). Islam (1%)... "
Islam Zambia - - - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 9,349,975. Christian 50%-75%, Muslim and Hindu 24%-49%, indigenous beliefs 1%.
Islam Zambia - 1.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
Islam Zambia 35,000 0.30% - - 2000 K. F. Bin Mohd Noor. "Muslims Statistics... for Year 2000 " [orig. src: Barrett. World Christian Encyclopedia, 1982] Table
Islam Zimbabwe - 1.50% - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD, 1979); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 6,500,000. Muslims 1.5% - largely immigrant Yao from Malawi.
Islam Zimbabwe 1,000,000 15.00% - - 1986 *LINK* Web site: "Arabic Paper "; web page: "Muslim Countries of the World " (viewed 15 June 1999). [Written 1998.] [NOTE: Questionable statistical methodology.] "In 1986... Muslim Education Trust organization [U.K.] obtained... 1971 census & [info. from] Embassies of the respective countires... 1971 census showed the Muslim Minorities countries had around 308 Million Muslim.. "; "...add (784.5M [independent Muslim countries]+ 308M) = 1092.5 Million Muslims in 1971 "; Table shows country, "population " [number of Muslims in the country], & % Muslim. Total adds up to 317,391,000, so these figures are apparently intended to be estimates for 1986.
Islam Zimbabwe - 1.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
Islam Zimbabwe 140,000 0.90% - - 2000 K. F. Bin Mohd Noor. "Muslims Statistics... for Year 2000 " [orig. src: Barrett. World Christian Encyclopedia, 1982] Table
Islam - active Europe - Western 10,000,000 - - - 1996 Decoo, William. "Issues in Writing European History and in Building the Church in Europe " in Journal of Mormon History (Spring 1997); pg. 164. "...the approximately 10 percent [of Christians] that still go 'very regularly' represent 38 million people in Western Europe. Islam counts almost 10 million faithful in European countries. About 100 million West Europeans are 'occassional' church-goers. "
Islam - Arab USA 68,000 - - - 1966 Noel, Donald L. Book review of The Arab Moslems in the United States: Religion and Assimilation by Abdo A. Elkholy, New Haven, Connecticut: College & University Press (1966) in Social Forces (1967, vol. 46, no. 1); pg. 137. "Arab-Moslem Americans... After presenting necessary background information on this small minority (approximately 68,000 in the U.S.)... "
Islam - Arab USA 100,000 10.00% - - 1986 McCarthy, Kevin. Saudi Arabia: A Desert Kingdom (series: Discovering Our Heritage). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Dillon Press, Inc. (1986); pg. 108. "Today about one million Arabs live in the United States. Perhaps 10% of them are Moslems. Most of these Arabs are third- and fourth-generation descendants of Middler Eastern people who arrived here between 1875 and 1948. "
Islam - black USA 1,000,000 - - - 1992 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992). [Orig. source: Author interview with Eric C. Lincoln]; pg. 184. "C. Eric Lincoln... estimates that as many as 1 million of America's Muslims are black. "
Islam - black USA 1,000,000 - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 437. "Since then, the number of African American Muslims in America has risen to over a million, roughly one-fourth of all American Muslims? "
Islam - black USA 1,250,000 - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 438. "Meanwhile, the hundreds of black mosques with no more connection to the Nation of Islam have become a strong presence in inner-city communities, their members openly opposing drug dealers, abstaining from alcohol, tobacco, and gambling, and promoting 'conservative' attitudes towards dress, family life, sexual conduct, and religious worship. No longer strictly African American, these congregations are accepting members of all ethnic communities. Like most American Muslims, their mosques tend to be politically liberal but socially conservative. The best estimates of Islam population in the United States range between 3 and 5 million, of whom approximately 25% are African Americans (the term Black Muslim no longer applies). "
Islam - black converts USA 1,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Seitz, Barr (ABC News). "Fastest-Growing Religion Often Misunderstood "; Broadcasted on BICNews 13 December 1997; (viewed online 26 Feb. 1999). "Most of the growth has come from immigration, but muchof it is home-grown. For many black Americans, Islam has become the religion of choice and some one million‹mostly men‹have converted. "
Islam - clerics Asia - Central 35,000 - - - 1944 Time-Life Books. The Soviet Union (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984); pg. 79. "Some 25,000 mosques have been shuttered or levelled in Central Asia, and the number of clerics there has dwindled from 35,000 to 1,000. "
Islam - clerics Asia - Central 1,000 - - - 1984 Time-Life Books. The Soviet Union (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984); pg. 79. "The Soviets seem to be more wary of the Muslim religion, knowing that it can be explosively nationalistic. Some 25,000 mosques have been shuttered or levelled in Central Asia, and the number of clerics there has dwindled from 35,000 to 1,000. "
Islam - folk world 525,700,000 - - - 1983 Parshall, Phil. Bridges to Islam: A Christian Perspective on Folk Islam; Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Book House (1985) [2d printing. 1st printing: 1983]; pg. 16 & 32. "...perhaps 70 percent of all Muslims in the world are influenced by a system we could properly term folk Islam. This book will focus on this major bloc of Muslims that the orthodox community considers aberrant. "; [pg. 32] "India, Pakistan, & Bangladesh together have a population of a quarter of a billion Muslims. This is about about one-third of the world's Islamic population. "
Islam - orthodox North America 33,000 - - - 1994 Lincoln, C. Eric. The Black Muslims in America (Third Edition, with a new "Postscript "; 1st printing 1961). Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (1994); pg. 224. "Apart from the followers of [Nation of Islam leader Elijah] Muhammad, there are scarcely 33,000 Moslems in the whole of North America--compared with 345,000 in South America, 12.5 million in Europe, and more than 400 million in Africa and Asia. "
Islam - other Kuwait 210,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Islam - other world 10,996,340 0.19% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. "Muslims. 83% Sunni Muslims, 16% Shia Muslims (Shiites), 1% other schools. " Islam world total: 1,099,634,000. Total world population: 5,716,425,000.
Islam - other world 11,263,250 0.19% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. "Muslims. 83% Sunni Muslims, 16% Shia Muslims (Shiites), 1% other schools. " Islam world total: 1,126,325,000. Total world population: 5,716,425,000.
Islam - Warith Deen Mohammed USA 250,000 - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 437. "In 1985 [Warith Deen Mohammed] formally dissolved the [Black Muslim/Nation of Islam] movement, and its members became integrated with mainstream Islam, a continuing process referred to by African American Muslims as 'the change' or 'the second experience.' Warith Deen Mohammed has upwards of 250,000 followers, to whom he communicates with a scholarly and inspiring weekly television program about Muslim life. He is considered by many as the most prominent and respected indigenous Muslim leaders in the West. "
Islamic Conference world 1,000,000,000 - - - 1999 "Iran president, pope call for interfaith dialogue " in Dallas Morning News (March 12, 1999); pg. 11A. "Romeo Panciroli, the apostolic nuncio in Iran, called it a 'meeting between the maximum authorities of the two great religions.' He noted that Mr. Khatami is president of the 55-nation Islamic Conference, which says it represents 1 billion Muslims. The Roman Catholic Church it has roughly the same number of followers. "
Islamic fundamentalist world - - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 191-192. "Laced across this grass-roots, decentralized network are more formal organizations--the Islamic Group, the Islamic Jihad, the Hezbollah, Hamas... and dozens more--each group connected by secret memberships, international bank transfers, telephone, and global couriers. In the fundamentalist movement, no one person or group of people has control. "
Islamic Group USA - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 461. "Amal ('Hope') is a Shiite group formed in Lebanon?Their militia?figured prominently in the fighting in Lebanon during the 1980s... but they appear to have no special religious beliefs of note. The same can be said for the so-called Islamic Group, which has been tied to terrorist plots in the U.S. These cells (which qualify as neither cults nor sects) garner a disproportionate share of media attention, but their religious significance is virtually nil. "
Islamic Group world - - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 191-192. "Laced across this grass-roots, decentralized network are more formal organizations--the Islamic Group, the Islamic Jihad, the Hezbollah, Hamas... and dozens more--each group connected by secret memberships, international bank transfers, telephone, and global couriers. In the fundamentalist movement, no one person or group of people has control. "
Islamic Jihad world - - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 191-192. "Laced across this grass-roots, decentralized network are more formal organizations--the Islamic Group, the Islamic Jihad, the Hezbollah, Hamas... and dozens more--each group connected by secret memberships, international bank transfers, telephone, and global couriers. In the fundamentalist movement, no one person or group of people has control. "
Ismaili Afghanistan - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 16-17. "Afghanistan is one of the most solidly Muslim countries in the world... About 10-20% of Afghanis are Shi'ah Muslims, of both the Imami and Ismaili sects. "
Ismaili Asia - - - - 1200 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1472. "Ismailis... the Fatimid rulers of Egypt from the 10th century were Ismailis and so were the Assassins... of Persia and Syria in the 12th and 13th centuries: the present imam of the Ismailis is the Aga Khan. "
Ismaili Egypt - - - - 1000 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1472. "Ismailis. Sect of Islam, named for Ismail (d. 760), eldest son of the sixth imam or spiritual leader of the Shia Moslems, excluded from the succession by his father: in the 9th century Ismaili preachers proclaimed the imminent return to earth of Ismail's son as the Mahdi, or Messiah: the Fatimid rulers of Egypt from the 10th century were Ismailis... "
Ismaili Egypt - - - - 1171 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1470. "...the Fatimid Caliphate which conquered Egypt and rujled there till overthrown by Saladin in 1171. During its ascendancy Egypt was a centre of culture, and many Fatimid buildings and works of art remain. "
Ismaili Germany 300 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Ismailiten ('Siebener-Schiiten') " in table. Source: Spuler-Stegemann.; Listed in 'Islam' section. Number of adherents listed as "200-300 "
Ismaili Iran - - - - 1999 Lyle, Garry. Iran (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 87. "Members of a few other Islamic sects live in Iran... Ismailism... lingers on in Iran and other Islamic countries... "
Ismaili Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 218-219. "Ismailis (Fatimid Ismailis): A group of Shiites which does not recognize Musa al-Kazim (d. 799) as the seventh Imam, but consider Ismail, the other son of al-Kazim's father, Jafar al-Sadiq (d. 765) as the last Imam visible on earth. Fatimid Ismailis, for this reason, are sometimes also called the Seveners. Ismailis are divided as to whether they acknowledge Ismail as a seventh Imam, or one of his sons. When the Ismailis spread into North Africa in the 10th to 12th centuries the Fatimids of Egypt recognized a son of Ismail's son, Muhammad. The fourth Fatimid caliph founded Cairo in 969. "
Ismaili Pakistan - - - - 1974 Lang, Robert. The Land and People of Pakistan (Portraits of the Nations series). Philadelphia & New York: J. B. Lippincott Co. (revised edition 1974); pg. 129. "An unusual offshoot of the Shi'as is the Ismaili sect, under the leadership of the Agha Khan, the fabulously wealthy young Muslim who graduated from Harvard... and now lives in Paris. There are now Ismailis in Pakistan, particularly on the northwest frontier; the Hunzas in Gilgit are members of this sect. "
Ismaili Tunisia - - - - 910 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1470. "The Ismailites are a smaller branch of Shiites, but came into prominence earlier than the Imamites. They believe in seven imams. A dynasty was established in Tunisia in 910 headed by Ubaydallah, called the Mahdi, a reputed descendant of Mohammed's daughter Fatima. This was the Fatimid Caliphate which conquered Egypt and rujled there till overthrown by Saladin in 1171. "
Ismaili world - - - - 765 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 433. "In 765, the Shiites split into two sects, the Seveners and the Twelvers (Ithna Asharis or Imami). "
Ismaili world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 635. "Sab'iyya (Arab; lit. 'sevener'). A name applied to the Isma'iliyya (especially the Qarmatians), who restricted the Imams to seven... The term sab'iyya was in all probability first used to signify the Ismaili doctrine that history is divided into seven eras... "; Pg. 636: "Dissemination of the Sab'iyya doctrines in different parts of the Muslim world resulted in the appearance of the revolutionary governments of the Qarmatians, Fatimids, Assassins, and other Ismaili groups. The Druzes can also be traced back to the early Sab'iyya... [later] the present day Nizari and... Must'ali Ismailis. "
Ismaili world - - - - 1993 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993); pg. 4-5. "At present there are 2 Isma'ili [Seveners] groups. The Nizari Isma'ilis recognize the legitimacy of Nizar, whose line of Imams has continued from 1095 to today... Nizaris live mainly in Pakistan, India, West Africa, Syria, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan... " Other Isma'ili branches are Musta'lians and Druze.
Ismaili world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "ISMAILIS: a dynamic and essentially LIBERAL SECTARIAN ISLAMIC movement developing from the SHI'A... "
Ismaili world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 434. "The Seveners, also called Ismailis, recognize only 6 of 12 Imams of the Shiites, the 7th being Ismail ibn Jafar (d. 760)?The Ismailis are still an influential force, especially in India, led by Imam Prince Karim?The Persian poet Omar Khayyam is thought to have been an Ismaili. "
Ismaili Yemen 316,000 2.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 830-832. [Article: Yemenis] "Location: Republic of Yemen; Population: 15.8 million "; "Some 2% of the population are Ismaili Shi'ah, a sect that is similar to the Zaydis. "
Italian Baptist Association North America - - - - 1979 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 265. "Many ethnic Baptist groups swell the total of the fellowship in the United States: Finnish Baptist Union of America, French Baptist Conference, Hungarian Baptist Union, Italian Baptist Association, Polish Baptist Conference in the U.S.A. and Canada; Roumanian Baptist Association and the Czechoslovak Baptist Convention of America. "
Italian Pentecostal Assemblies of God world 1,500 - 16
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 382. "There are 2 pentecostal sects among Italians in the U.S., both growing out of [1904] movement... The Italian Pentecostal Assemblies of God, with headquarters in Newark, NJ, has 16 churches and 1,500 members. "
Italian Pentecostal Church of Canada Canada 3,500 - 18
units
- 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 250. Church reporting.
Italian Pentecostal Church of Canada Canada 3,300 - 21
units
- 1990 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 244-247, 156. Table 1: CCS. (# of adherents is from table's "inclusive membership " column, not "full communicant " col.) Listed as "Italian Pentecostal Church of Canada. " Began in Ontario, 1912. Association with Pentec. Assembl. of Canada, but distinct.
Italian Pentecostal Church of Canada world 5,000 - - - 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 250. Church reporting.
Iteso Uganda - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Izala Niger - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 336. "Of late, reformist religious groups such as Izala, an anti-Sufi movement, have made numerous converts among the youth by preaching against an Islam which they see as tainted by local traditions. Izala members advocate frugality, and Islamic education for all, challenge the authority of elders, and condemn the use of amulets. "
Izumo Oyashirokyo Japan - - - - 1921 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 112-113. "Kyoha Shinto: 'Sect Shinto'... In 1921... the official association of Shinto sects had 13 groups... list also included Izumo oyashiro-kyo, Jikko-kyo, Misogi-kyo, Shinshu-kyo, Shinto shuseiha and Shinri-rikyo. "
Izumo Oyashirokyo Japan 1,051,206 0.91% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Shinto new religion (year of origin: 1873).
Jacobite world - - - - 500 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 471. "[after the] Council of Chalcedon in 451 AD... Another branch, the Jacobite, took the Monophysite position, as did the Armenians and the Copts in Egypt. "
Jacobite world 100,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 368. "Jacobite Church (Christian). Monophysite church of Syria, named 'Jacobite' by the opponents of Jacob Baradeus (500-578), who traveled widely in support of the Monophysites and was recognized as the spiritual leader of the church in Syria... Today the head of the church is the Patriarch 'of the Apostolic See of Antioch,' but his seat is in Iraq... They are in agreement with the Coptic Christians in faith and sacraments, but make little use of icons. In the last century schools have been attached to the few remaining monasteries... There are about 100,000 Jacobites today. "
Jainism Africa 58,000 0.01% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Jainism Africa 59,000 0.01% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Jainism Africa 53,000 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "The Geography of Religion Website " (assembled by the students of Morehead State University, under Prof. Timothy C. Pitts); web page: "The Geography of Jainism " (viewed 2 March 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers (1996), pp. 356-357.] table with 3 columns: "Area "; "Adherents "; "Population Percentage "
Jainism Africa 65,000 0.01% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Jainism Asia 4,804,000 0.14% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Jainism Asia 4,835,000 0.14% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Jainism Asia 3,717,000 0.10% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "The Geography of Religion Website " (assembled by the students of Morehead State University, under Prof. Timothy C. Pitts); web page: "The Geography of Jainism " (viewed 2 March 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers (1996), pp. 356-357.] table with 3 columns: "Area "; "Adherents "; "Population Percentage "; [Geographical regions in this table: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, Northern America, Oceania, and Eurasia]


Jainism, continued

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