Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Arianism, world

Arianism, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Arianism world - - - - 381 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 46. "Arianism. Condemned... at councils of Nicea (325) and Constantinople (381); doctrine and movement originated by the Alexandrian priest Arius (d. 336), who maintained that the Son was both 'creature' and 'God,' different in essence from the Father but related to him by 'participation' and by 'adoption'--i.e., as a creature elevated through obedience to the paternal will. Stressing the dissimilar essences of the persons, Arians believed in a trinity in which the Son and Holy Spirit were subordinate to the unbegotten Father. "
Arianism world 0 - - - 660 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 123. "The conversion of the Franks had also much influence on the other Germanic invaders, though the example of the native population among whom they were settled worked even more powerfully. The Burgundians abandoned Arianism in 517, and in 532 became part of the Frankish kingdom. The imperial conquests of Justinian ended the Arian kingdoms of the Vandals and Ostrogoths. The rivalry of the creeds was terminated in Spain by the renunciation of Arianism by the Visigothic King, Recared, in 587, and confirmed at the Third Council of Toledo, in 589. About 590 the gradual conversion of the Lombards to Catholicism [from Arianism] began--a process not completed till about 660. Thus all Arianism ultimately disappeared. "
Arianism world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "ARIANISM... named after its principle exponent ARIUS who was a thorough-going Greek RATIONALIST who inherited the almost universally held LOGOS CHRISTOLOGY of the Eastern Roman Empire... In February 325, Arius was condemned as a heretic at a Synod in Antioch. The Emperor Constantine, who was sympathetic to Arianism, then called the first ECUMENICAL council--known as the Council of Nicaea--which met in May 325 and also condemned Arius and his teachings, but instead of resolving the issues, the Council launched an Empire-wide Christological debate during which it often seemed that Arianism would triumph as the dominant form of Christianity. Only after a hundred years of heated debate did ORTHODOXY emerge triumphant. Today, a FORM of Arianism has been revived among UNITARIANS and the JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES "
Arica USA - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 320. "Elements of Hinduism pervade the new religious movements in America, especially those with eclectic teachings, such as Arica, the MSIA movement led by Dr. John-Roger Hinkins, and the commune headed by Stephen Gaskin. "
Arikara North America 3,000 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 48. "Arikara... They numbered 3,000 in 1780, 460 in 1970. "
Arikara North America 460 - - - 1970 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 48. "Arikara... They numbered 3,000 in 1780, 460 in 1970. "
Arikara North America - Northern Great Plains 3,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Arikara world 3,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Aristotelian Greece - - 1
unit
1
country
-335 B.C.E. Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992); pg. 16. "Aristotle was the last, and the most influential of the great Greek philosophers. Born in 384 at Stagyra in Thrace, he was sent by his father, a court physician, to Plato's Academy... He challenged Plato's idealism most directly in his empirical approach to the study of nature. In Lesbos he did original work in marine biology... In 335 he founded his own school at Athens, the Lyceum. As a centre of systematic research it far outstripped the Academy. When teaching, Aristotle would walk and talk, and from this habit, the Lyceum students became known as the peripatetics. "
Aristotelian Greece - - - - -322 B.C.E. Yenne, Bill. 100 Men Who Shaped World History. San Francisco, CA: Bluewood Books (1994); pg. 22. "Aristotle 384-322 BC. Taught by Plato and the teacher of Alexander the Great, Aristotle was one of history's greatest philosophers, and was one of the first to fully explore the relationship and synergy of all aspects of nature and humanity... Born in Stagira, a Greek outpost... Aristotle became a pupil of Plato at age 17, remaining first as a student and later as a teacher at Plato's Academy in Athens for 20 years... Under Alexander's auspices, he formed his own school, the Lyceum, which he headed until 323 BC... his major impact on the evolution of learning was his application of a systematic method to the study of human relationships with other aspects of the world. Aristotelian thought was ultimately harmonized with Christian theology by St. Thomas Aquinas in the 13th century, with Jewish theology by Maimonides (1135-1204) and with Islam by Averroes (1126-1198). "
Aristotelian world - - - - -350 B.C.E. Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 9. "Aristotle: Renowned fourth-century BCE Greek philosopher. In the Middle Ages, when reek thought in its Arabic garb had penetrated the circles of the Jewish philosophers, Aristotle is quoted and his opinions discussed. "
Aristotelian world - - - - -50 B.C.E. Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992); pg. 17. "Aristotle was virtually canonised by the medieval schoolmen as a pagan saint. Many of his ideas, oddly welded to Christian or Islamic faith, were carried down through the ages as dogma and remained unchallenged for almost 2,000 years. Of course he can't be blamed for the way posterity made him an infallible authority. "; "Aristotle left many writings--most of them closely-argued treatises. He is not an entertaining writer like Plato, and from being revered by the Church scholars, became reviled in the Renaissance, and the stigma of the boring professor has stuck to him. But in scope, and often in precision, he surpasses Plato. he was the first to divide and subdivide the areas of enquiry--the first to attempt a classification of knowledge. Andronicus of Rhodes put the treatises into order about 50 BC. He placed a series of writings after the Physics & called them Meta-Physics (literally 'after physics') "
Armenian Armenia 3,552,000 96.00% - - 1996 Kasbarian, Lucine. Armenia: A Rugged Land, An Enduring People (series: 'Discovering Our Heritage'). Parsippany, NJ: Dillon Press (1998); pg. 4. "Population: Estimated 1996 population - 3.7 million... about 96 percent are ethnic Armenians; the rest are Russians, Kurds, and other minorities. "
Armenian California: Fresno County 40,000 - - - 1998 Kasbarian, Lucine. Armenia: A Rugged Land, An Enduring People (series: 'Discovering Our Heritage'). Parsippany, NJ: Dillon Press (1998); pg. 135. "Today about 40,000 Armenians live in Fresno County, California, where their family-owned businesses continue to pack dried fruits and nuts and grow their own special varieties of melons, grapes, and raisins. "
Armenian California: Glendale 45,000 - - - 1998 Kasbarian, Lucine. Armenia: A Rugged Land, An Enduring People (series: 'Discovering Our Heritage'). Parsippany, NJ: Dillon Press (1998); pg. 139. "The largest community of Armenians in the United States today is located in southern California, where in the city of Glendale alone there are some 45,000 Armenians. In this region you can see Armenian-owned businesses with storefront signs written in both English and Armenian. "
Armenian Massachusetts: Boston 50,000 - - - 1998 Kasbarian, Lucine. Armenia: A Rugged Land, An Enduring People (series: 'Discovering Our Heritage'). Parsippany, NJ: Dillon Press (1998); pg. 139-141. "The third largest [U.S. Armenian] community is in the greater Boston area, where about 50,000 Armenians live. Watertown, Massachusetts, is home to many Armenian institutions, including the Armenian Library and Museum of America, which houses many artifacts and family heirlooms such as coins, rugs, and costumes. "
Armenian New York: New York City 100,000 - - - 1998 Kasbarian, Lucine. Armenia: A Rugged Land, An Enduring People (series: 'Discovering Our Heritage'). Parsippany, NJ: Dillon Press (1998); pg. 139. "The second largest [Armenian community in the U.S.], and one of the oldest..., is in the New York metropolitan area, where 80,000 to 100,000 Armenians make their home. Many Armenian organizations also have their national headquarters in the New York area. "
Armenian world - - - - 1998 Kasbarian, Lucine. Armenia: A Rugged Land, An Enduring People (series: 'Discovering Our Heritage'). Parsippany, NJ: Dillon Press (1998); pg. 134. "Unlike people of most nationalities, more Armenians live outside their homeland than within it... Today there are Armenian communities on almost every continent on Earth, and in nations as diverse and as different as Australia, Israel, and Switzerland. "
Armenian Apostolic Church Armenia 1,155,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 46. "Armenian Church... in Soviet Armenia, where about a third of the world's approximately 3 1/2 million Armenians now live. Around 125,000 live in North America. "
Armenian Apostolic Church Armenia 3,540,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; Listed in table as "Armenian Apostolic (Orthodox) "
Armenian Apostolic Church Armenia 3,478,000 94.00% - - 1996 Kasbarian, Lucine. Armenia: A Rugged Land, An Enduring People (series: 'Discovering Our Heritage'). Parsippany, NJ: Dillon Press (1998); pg. 4-5. "Population: Estimated 1996 population - 3.7 million... Major Religion: Christian; 94 percent of Armenians belong to the Armenian Apostolic Church. "
Armenian Apostolic Church Armenia 3,227,611 94.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Armenian Orthodox 94%; Total population: 3,433,629.
Armenian Apostolic Church Armenia 3,478,000 94.00% - - 1997 Dhilawala, Sakina. Armenia (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1997); pg. 77. "While the majority of the population of Armenia (about 94%) are members of the Armenian Apostolic Church... "
Armenian Apostolic Church Armenia 3,216,468 94.00% - - 1998 *LINK* CIA World Factbook 1998 (viewed June 24, 1999) Armenian Orthodox 94%; Total population: 3,421,775 (July 1998 est.)
Armenian Apostolic Church Armenia - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 42-43. "Religions: Armenian Apostolic Church; some American Christian sects "; "In the late 20th century, the Armenian liturgy has changed little from its classical form, canonized in the Middle Ages. Not all Armenians are members of the Armenian Apostolic Church, partly due to the pressures of communism in Soviet Armenia, and the attraction of other Christian faiths in the diaspora. Nevertheless, the Armenian Church has played an important role in the preservation of Armenian history & culture. "
Armenian Apostolic Church Armenia 3,310,210 94.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies "By official 1994 estimate, [total] population 3,521,517. Approximately 94 percent of population belongs to Armenian Apostolic Church. Other religions include Russian Orthodox, Roman Catholic, Protestant denominations, and Islam. "
Armenian Apostolic Church Australia 8,290 0.05% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "Armenian Apostolic Church "]
Armenian Apostolic Church Azerbaijan 430,304 5.60% - - 1994 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Mid-1994 estimate [total pop.] 7,684,456. In 1989 Muslim 87 percent (about 70 percent of which Shia), Russian Orthodox 5.6 percent, and Armenian Apostolic 5.6 percent (much less in early 1990s).
Armenian Apostolic Church Azerbaijan 170,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; Listed in table as "Armenian Apostolic (Orthodox) "
Armenian Apostolic Church Azerbaijan 179,342 2.30% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Muslim 93.4%, Russian Orthodox 2.5%, Armenian Orthodox 2.3%, other 1.8% (1995 est.); Total population: 7,797,476 (1997 est.).
Armenian Apostolic Church Azerbaijan 180,678 2.30% - - 1998 *LINK* CIA World Factbook 1998 (viewed June 24, 1999) "Population: 7,855,576 (July 1998 est.)... Religions: Muslim 93.4%, Russian Orthodox 2.5%, Armenian Orthodox 2.3%, other 1.8% (1995 est.); note: religious affiliation is still nominal in Azerbaijan; actual practicing adherents are much lower "
Armenian Apostolic Church Canada 75,000 - 10
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 653. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in Canada "; Membership figs. based on reports from group officials. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants. Listed as "Armenian Holy Apostolic Church (Canadian Diocese) ".
Armenian Apostolic Church Canada 75,000 - 10
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 694. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Armenian Holy Apostolic Church (Canadian Diocese)
Armenian Apostolic Church Georgia (country) 454,480 8.00% - - 1994 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Mid-1994 estimate 5,681,025 [total pop.]. In 1993 Georgian Orthodox 65 percent, Muslim 11 percent, Russian Orthodox 10 percent, and Armenian Apostolic 8 percent.
Armenian Apostolic Church Georgia (country) 430,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; Listed in table as "Armenian Apostolic (Orthodox) "
Armenian Apostolic Church Georgia (country) 412,803 8.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Christian Orthodox 75% (Georgian Orthodox 65%, Russian Orthodox 10%), Muslim 11%, Armenian Apostolic 8%, unknown 6%; Total Population: 5,160,042.
Armenian Apostolic Church Germany 35,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Armenisch-Apostolische Kirche " in table. Source: REMID. [Listed in 'Orthodox and Eastern Churches' section.]; "Armenisch-Apostolische Kirche " and "Armenisch-Orthodoxe Kirche " are listed separately.
Armenian Apostolic Church Iran 108,000 - - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD, 1979 edition); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) There remain [of Christians]: Armenians 108,000; Nestorian 25,000; Roman Catholics 21,000
Armenian Apostolic Church Iran: Kurdistan - - - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 97. "The population of Iranian Kurdistan is 98% Muslim. The remaining 2% is made up of Armenian and Assyrian Christians and some Jews. "
Armenian Apostolic Church Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999); pg. 60. Pg. 60: "Jordan's population of 4.4 million (not including the West Bank)... About 7 per cent of the nation's people are Christian... A small percentage of Armenians and other cultural minorities live in Amman, as well as in other parts of the country. "
Armenian Apostolic Church Lebanon 66,000 6.00% - - 1932 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986); pg. 168. Table: "Estimated Demographic Change in Lebanon, 1932 - 1980 "; "Based on population of 1.1 million. "; Listed in table as "Armenian Christian "
Armenian Apostolic Church Lebanon 104,000 4.00% - - 1980 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986); pg. 168. Table: "Estimated Demographic Change in Lebanon, 1932 - 1980 "; "Based on population of 2.6 million, not including 350,000 Palestinians. "; Listed in table as "Armenian Christian "
Armenian Apostolic Church Lebanon 130,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; Listed in table as "Armenian Apostolic (Orthodox) "
Armenian Apostolic Church New York: Buffalo 126 - 1
unit
- 1926 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997). [Orig. source: 1926 U.S. govt. census from Bureau of the Census, 1930, vol. 1]; pg. 8. "Table 31. Number of churches, membership [incl. children]... 1926 "; Reports prepared by pastors/boards of elders. Listed in table as Church of Armenia in America. [Table does not make it entirely clear which Armenian rel. body these figures represent.>
Armenian Apostolic Church North America 125,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 46. "Armenian Church... Around 125,000 live in North America. "
Armenian Apostolic Church Soviet Union - - - - 1984 Time-Life Books. The Soviet Union (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984); pg. 79. "Armenians [during Soviet occupation]... continue to hold fast to their faith and observe its traditional practices; Armenian children still flock to the 17-centuries-old Gregorian church in Echmiadzin, leading their beriboned farm animals to be blessed before they are sacrificed. "
Armenian Apostolic Church USA 275,000 - 90
units
- 1970 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 996-997. "In the U.S. the Armenian Apostolic Church became the largest and most prosperous of the Monophysite churches. Organized in 1899, in 1970 it consisted of about 275,000 members and nearly 90 congregations... "
Armenian Apostolic Church USA - - 95
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). "The Armenian Apostolic Church of America has 66 churches; the separated Apostolic Church has 29 [the separated church is under the Holy See of Cilicia in Antelias].
Armenian Apostolic Church USA 150,000 - - - 1995 1995 Yearbook of American and Canadian Churches -
Armenian Apostolic Church USA 150,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* OPPOSING VIEW (anti-) web page: "Orthodox " (viewed 26 Feb. 1999); [Orig. source: 1995 Yearbook of American and Canadian Churches] "The Orthodox in the U.S.A.: Total: 1,885,436; Orthodox Church of America: 600,000; Armenian Diocese: 414,000; Antiochian Archidioceses: 350,000; Coptic Church: 180,000; Armenian Apostolic: 150,000; Other (8 denominations): 191,000 "
Armenian Apostolic Church USA - - 100
units
- 1998 Kasbarian, Lucine. Armenia: A Rugged Land, An Enduring People (series: 'Discovering Our Heritage'). Parsippany, NJ: Dillon Press (1998); pg. 141. "The majority of Armenians follow the Armenian Apostolic faith. Although there are more than 100 Armenian Apostolic churches in the United States, they are not all under the jurisdiction of a single administration. When Armenia became a Soviet state, the Soviet authorities discouraged the practice of religion. Among other things this meant that only 20 churches at a time were allowed to operate in the entire nation. Many Armenian Americans who felt that Armenia should be a free and independent nation were not pleased that the church in Armenia had to answer to the Soviet government. Differences among Armenian Americans led to the establishment of two separate administrative church bodies with two spiritual leaders... The split in the church led to the duplication of many Armenian church organizations. With the collapse of the Soviet Union, however, reunification of the two church bodies appears to be on the horizon. "
Armenian Apostolic Church world - - - - 500 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 471. "[after the] Council of Chalcedon in 451 AD... Another branch, the Jacobite, took the Monophysite position, as did the Armenians and the Copts in Egypt. "
Armenian Apostolic Church world 3,500,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 46. "Armenian Church. Native Monophysite church of the Armenians... The Supreme Catholicos resides in Etchmiadzin, in Soviet Armenia, where about a third of the world's approximately 3 1/2 million Armenians now live. Around 125,000 live in North America. "
Armenian Apostolic Church world 3,000,000 - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 86. "...the Armenian Church... At the present time there are between 2 1/2 and 3 million Armenian Christians with large communities in the Middle East, Europe, and North and South America. "
Armenian Apostolic Church world 900,000 - - 14
countries
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy; pg. 138. "Armenian Apostolic Church of America... 138 E. 39th St.; New York, NY [H.Q.]... In 1933, the Armenian Church in America split along political lines... Membership: In 1988, the church reported 350,000 members in 37 churches with 40 priests in the U.S. There were 4 churches in Canada. Affiliated congregations were located in 12 countries with a reported worldwide membership of 900,000. "
Armenian Apostolic Church world 4,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "Together, the Oriental Orthodox Churches have about 36,000,000 members. Syrian Orthodox Church... Coptic Orthodox Church c. 10,000,000; British Orthodox Church c. 5000?; Armenian Orthodox Church c.4,000,000; Ethiopian Orthodox Church c. 20,000,000 "
Armenian Apostolic Church world 7,000,000 0.12% - - 2000 Briefs: Armenian chief, church head plan yule visit to Bethlehem " in Deseret News (15 Jan 2000); pg. Reuters. Religion Briefs: Armenian chief, church head plan yule visit to Bethlehem in Deseret News (15 Jan 2000). -
Armenian Apostolic Church of America Canada - - 4
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy; pg. 138. "Membership: In 1988... There were 4 churches in Canada. "
Armenian Apostolic Church of America North America - - 41
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy; pg. 138. "Armenian Apostolic Church of America... 138 E. 39th St.; New York, NY [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1988, the church reported 350,000 members in 37 churches with 40 priests in the U.S. There were 4 churches in Canada. "
Armenian Apostolic Church of America USA - - 34
units
- 1973 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 84. -
Armenian Apostolic Church of America USA 350,000 - 37
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy; pg. 138. "Membership: In 1988, the church reported 350,000 members in 37 churches with 40 priests in the U.S. "
Armenian Apostolic Church of America USA 150,000 - 30
units
- 1992 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from table's "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Armenian Apostolic Church of America. "
Armenian Apostolic Church of America USA - - 29
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). "The Armenian Apostolic Church of America has 66 churches; the separated Apostolic Church has 29 [the separated church is under the Holy See of Cilicia in Antelias].
Armenian Apostolic Church of America USA 180,000 - 28
units
- 1995 *LINK* web site for Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches (accessed 1998); [Orig. source: Source: Kenneth B. Bedell, editor, Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches, annual.] Table: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches: U.S. Religious Bodies with more than 60,000 Members "; "...prepared for the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census... for the 1997 edition of the Statistical Abstract of the U.S. "
Armenian Apostolic Church of America USA 180,000 - 28
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.


Armenian Apostolic Church of America, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.