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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Isis worship, Roman Empire

Isis worship, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Isis worship Roman Empire - - - - 30 C.E. Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992); pg. 28. "Christianity had lots of rivals other than Judaism. There was the cult of Isis, Mithraism, the official divinities, and Orphic Mysticism. "
Isis worship Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1928. "During the Hellenistic period... very little is heard about Mysteries. But at the time of the Roman Empire such religions suddenly sprang up. The best-known are the Mysteries of Isis and Mithras... the conquest of Egypt by Augustus [was] a prerequisite for the mission of the Mysteries of Isis. "
Isis worship Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1928. "The various Mysteries appealed to sociologically different strata of society... the cult of Isis attracted the middle classes, wealthy freedmen and courtesans... "
Isis worship Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 307. "The Greeks called [Mithraism] and other such cults--like those of Eleusis, Dionysus, and Isis--mysteria, from a root meaning literally 'to keep one's mouth shut,' and from which the English words mystery and mysticism are derived. The term mystery applies to a sect capable of conferring initiation on its members. "
Isis worship Roman Empire - 0.00% - - 300 C.E. Casson, Lionel. Ancient Egypt. New York: Time-Life Books (1965); pg. 164. "But though this international cult [Osiris, Isis, Horus worship] endured for some centuries, it was doomed by the birth of a new religion in neighboring Palestine. By the Fourth Century A.D., Isis and the whole pantheon of Egyptian deities had fallen before a triumphant new rival, Christianity. As the new creed swept around the Mediterranean, one of its first stopping places was Egypt, and the ancient and exhausted land provided the inspiration for several features of incalculable importance to the young and vigorous religion. "
Isis worship world - - - - -200 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1461. "This fact [that it was the state religion of Egypt] encouraged the spread of the Isis and Serapis cult in the Greek ruling circles of the Ptolemies, in Cyrene, Cyprus, Crete, the coastal towns of Asia Minor and the Greek islands whose religious centre as Delos. On the other hand, for political reasons, an expansion beyond the sphere of influence of the Ptolemies was not regarded favourably anywhere. There was only branches of the Isis cult in seaports, such as Athens, Salonica, and on Euboea. But even in Egypt itself, linking the royal cult with the Isis-Serapis religion was in many respects a disadvantage as pure religious feelings cannot arise when the practice of a religion is welcomed and rewarded so distinctly by those in high places. "
Isis worship world - - - - -200 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1461. "The political decline of the Ptolemies, which started in 200 BC, followed by the compete loss of autonomy that resulted from Egypt's incorporation into the Roman Empire, provided a real opportunity for the Isis religion to expand. Having lots its political aspect, it became possible for the religious and ethical aspect to be strengthened. On Delos, for instance, the Isis cult became purely religious, and as Delos was an important centre for trade with Italy, the Delian cult even reached that country. The tranformation of the cult of Isis into a religion of Mysteries first occurred in the Roman Empire. Because there was no longer a political aspect to worshipping the goddess, the cult now appealed to people as individuals: each one was personally offered salvation, and promised regeneration after death. If a man entered into the service of Isis it was his own personal decision. "
Isis worship world - - - - 100 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 319. "Isis, the goddess whose cult began in Egypt and spread to Asia Minor, Cyprus, Crete, Greece, Rome, and Britain, is the Great Sorceress Who Heals, Mother of Heaven, Queen of the Cosmos, Lady of Wisdom, the personification of the life force itself, especially as healer and protector. When her brother and husband Osiris was drowned by his loutish brother Set, Isis recovered the body, elicited his sexual essence from it, and conceived a child, Horus... Many art historians, along with mythologist Joseph Campbell, believe that Isis and Horus became the model for countless Christian depictions of the Madonna and Child, just as Mary took on the titles once applied to Isis... "
Isis worship world - - - - 312 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1461. "After the conquest of Egypt by Alexander the Great in 331 BC the country was ruled by Greeks for 300 years, and during this period the cult of Isis became completely Hellenized. When the Romans took over the government in 30 BC they relied on the supprt of the Greek middle class in Egypt and the langauge of administration remained Greek; during this era, the goddess's cult spread over the entire Mediterranean basin. It was only when Constantine the Great, after his victory at the Milvian bridge in 312 AD raised Christianity to the level of the national religion, that the Isis cult lost its importance and was subsequently prohibited. "
ISKCON Australia - - 9
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "So far, 65 religious groups and associations have completed a questionnaire and are listed below... ISKCON now has 9 centres in Australia and 500 centres worldwide. "
ISKCON Canada 450 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Interactive Bible " (ultra-conservative Evangelical); web page: "Statistics of Religion in North America " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999); Web page by: Steve Rudd, 33 Highcliffe Ave., Hamilton, Ontario Canada L9A 3L3 Table: "[NRMs] in Canada: Membership numbers "; "Scientologist 700; Hare Krishna 450; Moonies 650; Children of god 250; New age type groups 4100 "
ISKCON Denmark 150 - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "Danish members of the Unification Church number (at the very most) around 40 after more than 20 years of missionary work in the country. ISKCON presents the same picture. The organization has around 40 regular devotees in Denmark, and some 150 people who are affiliated to the organization in one way or the other, although not on a full-time scale. "
ISKCON Denmark - - 1
unit
- 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "ISKCON counts three centres in Denmark in its public registration of where the organization can be found around the world. One of the centres is a farm where two people live and work. Another is a vegetarian restaurant, and a third is the group's actual temple, where some 25 people live and work (other inner members, who have married, usually live outside the temple/monastery premises). "
ISKCON France 500 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Total members: 500; F/T: 400; P/T: 100.
ISKCON Germany 5,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "ISKCON (Hare Krishna) " in table. Source: REMID.; In comments column: "350 Devotees, mit befreundetem Umfeld ca. 5,000 " [ "50 DEVO teas, with friendly surrounding field approx. 5,000 "]
ISKCON Germany, West 500 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Total: 500; Full-time: 100; Part-time: 400.
ISKCON Italy 2,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Total: 2,000; Full-time: 500; Sympathizers: 30,000.
ISKCON Netherlands 250 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Total: 250; Full-time: 150; Sympathizers: 20,000.
ISKCON New Zealand 399 0.01% - - 1986 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1986 NZ population: 3,263,228.
ISKCON New Zealand 375 0.01% - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1991 NZ population: 3,373,853.
ISKCON New Zealand 255 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1996 NZ population: 3,616,633.
ISKCON Ontario: Toronto 80 - - - 1985 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 241. "In 1984 a Toronto magazine estimated that there were 10,000 Hare Krishna members in that city. But when Irving Hexham, Raymond Curie, and Joan Townsend (1985) checked on the matter, they found that the correct total was 80. "
ISKCON Russia 3,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Shterin, Marat S. "NEW RELIGIONS, CULTS AND SECTS IN RUSSIA: A CRITIQUE AND BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE PROBLEMS " the Krishnas have 2,500 - 3000
ISKCON Russia - 0.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 153,646,000; [Listed in table as "Hare Krishna "]
ISKCON Slovenia - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 359-360. "Slovenes are mostly Roman Catholic... 90% of Slovenes claim to be nominally Catholic... Small numbers of people belong to other religious groups... Of recent groups, some are non-Christian, such as Hare Rama Hare Krishna. "
ISKCON Sweden 500 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Total: 500; Full-time: 100; Part-time: 400.
ISKCON Switzerland 100 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "
ISKCON United Kingdom - - - - 1995 *LINK* "Religion; Secularisation " web page; "Sociology at Hewitt " site, Hewitt School, Norfolk, UK Note also the recent growth in smaller (uncounted) sects, e.g. Jehovah's witnesses, Mormons, Krishna Consciousness.
ISKCON United Kingdom: Britain 20,000 - - - 1985 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Adherents.com] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... ISKCON: Britain:... [Notes from author: "...an Indian informant they're expressed in numbers of families rather than individuals - 200-300 families of initiated devotees (which probably includes a fairly high proportion of celibates) and 10,000 families of life members - as well as people who attend the UK temples, for which they have no numbers, except that there were about 60,000 at the main temple to celebrate Krishna's birthday last year. "]
ISKCON United Kingdom: Britain 4,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Listed in table as "ISKCON (Hare Krishna) "; Total membership: 4000; F/T: 300; P/T: the rest; Sympathizers: "the Hindu community, i.e., 300,000 "
ISKCON United Kingdom: Britain - - - - 1989 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 246. "Barker (1989:147):... far larger [than in U.S.] number of worshippers in ISKCON temples in Britain who are drawn from the Asian community and are regarded as litlte more or less than members of one Hindu tradition among many by their fellow Asians. ISKCON is... a respected member of the National Council of Hindu Temples... "
ISKCON USA 32,000 - 40
units
- 1980 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 48-49. "According to Hare Krishna officials there are now about ten to twelve thousand initiated full-time members in the United States, living in forty temples... there are tens of thousands of additional 'lay' members who attend religious events... "
ISKCON USA 20,000 - - - 1982 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 246. "Hare Krishna (...ISKON) was credited with approx. 20,000 members in the U.S. in the early 1980s (Barker, 1982:30), but a Krishna spokesperson told Appel (1983:13) that there were 5,000 full-time members in the U.S... "
ISKCON USA 3,000 - - - 1982 Long, Robert Emmet (ed.). Religious Cults in America (The Reference Shelf: Volume 66 Number 4), New York: The H. W. Wilson Co. (1994). [Orig. source: Article by J. Gordon Melton. From appendix A of The Cult Experience, Cleveland, OH: The Pilgrim Press (1982)]; pg. 88. "Although new members are still taken in, growth of the Society has slowed, and membership seems to have leveled out at around 3,000. Where temples are located a large group of non-members may gather on Sundays, when the Krishnas give their free feasts. "
ISKCON USA 3,000 - - - 1982 Melton, J. Gordon & Robert L. Moore. The Cult Experience: Responding to the New Religious Pluralism. New York: The Pilgrim Press (1984 [3rd printing; 1st printing 1982]); pg. 140. "Although new members are still taken in, growth of the Society has slowed, and membership seems to have leveled out at around 3,000. Where temples are located a large group of nonmembers may gather on Sundays, when the Krishnas give their free feasts. "
ISKCON USA 5,000 - - - 1982 Melton, J. Gordon & Robert L. Moore. The Cult Experience: Responding to the New Religious Pluralism. New York: The Pilgrim Press (1984 [3rd printing; 1st printing 1982]); pg. 125. "The largest of these group number less than 10,000, and the two most famous--the Hare Krishnas and the Unification Church--number less than 5,000. "
ISKCON USA 250,000 - - - 1984 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 246. "Melton (1991, Vol. 3:206) states that the Krishna group reported 3,000 core community members in 1984 but also claimed 250,000 'lay constituents.' "
ISKCON USA 15,000 - - - 1988 Palmer, Spencer J. & Roger R. Keller. Religions of the World: A Latter-day Saint View, Brigham Young University: Provo, Utah (1990); pg. 95. "In the later 1980s the [ISKON/Hare Krishna] society numbered more than fifteen thousand in this country and an uncounted number in India, owing to the popularity of Vishnu and ISKON temples there. "
ISKCON USA 3,000 - - - 1989 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 241. "After more than twenty years of operations, the membership of ISKCON (the Hare Krishnas) is estimated at 3,000 (Melton, 1989). "
ISKCON USA 250,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) 3,000 core members; 250,000 lay constituents in United States; 8,000 members worldwide
ISKCON Utah 2,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Mims, Bob. "Utah Krishnas Look Forward To 13th Annual Festival of India " in Salt Lake Tribune, 11 Sept. 1999. (viewed online 11 Sept. 1999) "If Caru Das and Utah's 2,000 Hare Krishna devotees have their way, guests attending next year's Festival of India will be able to visit a new hilltop temple complex of colonnades, patios, gardens and fountains dedicated to the Hindu deity Krishna. Das, spokesman for the Spanish Fork ashram, said construction crews, assisted by numerous volunteers, expect to finish the $1 million, 15-acre temple site by June 1, 2000.... Das had special praise for his Mormon neighbors, noting the Canyon Point Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is helping excavate a 189,000-gallon lake. Mormon volunteers also have pitched in to help with plumbing and electrical work. "
ISKCON Utah: Utah County - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher "LDS Foundation Aids Krishna Temple " in Salt Lake Tribune, June 5, 1999 (viewed online 11 June 1999). "Utah's Hare Krishna temple construction fund has received a $25,000 donation from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Foundation. Krishna leaders in Spanish Fork were thrilled with the donation. 'We've always felt welcome in Utah since we arrived 15 years ago, and have had nothing but warm relations with our Mormon friends and neighbors,' says Vaibhavi Devi, the temple's designer. 'And now, when we are struggling for funds to build a temple, their generous response has been so gratifying that I get goose bumps when I think of it.'... In addition to the funds, many local Mormons have contributed labor whenever it was needed, she says. The Radha Krishna Temple will be 15,000 square feet and is modeled after the ancient Palace Temple of Kusum Sarovar... "
ISKCON world 50 - 6
units
- 1967 Herman, A. L. A Brief Introduction to Hinduism: Religion, Philosophy, and Ways of Liberation; Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado (1991); pg. 27. "Bhaktivedanta...came back to the United States in December [1967] as the sole leader of fifty disciples and six ISKCON centers. "
ISKCON world - - - 8
countries
1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 230. [over 1000 devotees in America, and...] "The movement is spreading overseas, as well, and there are now ISKCON centers in England, Holland, Germany, France, Australia, and Japan... [In India] a number of centers have been opened. "
ISKCON world - - 200
units
60
countries
1977 Hubner, John & Lindsey Gruson. Monkey on a Stick: Murder, Madness and the Hare Krishnas; New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Publishers (1988); pg. xi. "in 1977... had over 200 temples and farms in 60 countries, tens of thousands of followers, and tens of millions of dollars. In the U.S. alone, ISKCON had 57 temples and farms, more than 5,000 devotees, and thousands of uninitiated believers. "
ISKCON world - - 100
units
- 1980 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 48. "There are over one hundred Krishna centers in Africa, Asia, Europe, Israel, Latin America, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. "
ISKCON world 41,500 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 14-15. "If we take the Hare Krishna movement and look at its worldwide following we get an estimated total membership of c.41,500 and full time membership of c.4,500, with possibly hundreds of thousands of sympathizers. "
ISKCON world - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "new sects and movements in Hinduism both in India and the West, for example, the Sri Aurobindo Ashram, the Theosophical Society, Arya Samaj, Brahmo Samaj, Ananda Marga, Transcendental Meditation, the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (Hare Krishna)... "
ISKCON world - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "Some new religions have been accepted by their parent communities as expressions of orthodoxy: for example the Hare Krishna movement is accepted by many Hindus "
ISKCON world - - 60
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). "The U.S. headquarters [of ISKON] is in Los Angeles, overseeing more than 60 temples or centers in the U.S. and abroad. "
ISKCON world 250,000 - - - 1993 O'Brien, J. & M. Palmer. The State of Religion Atlas. Simon & Schuster: New York (1993); pg. 35. New Religious Movements map ( "committed adherents "): "International Society for Krishna Consciousness 250,000 " Founded in 1965.
ISKCON world 1,000,000 - - - 1998 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Original source of world figure: web site: Ontario Consulants for Religious Tolerance] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... ISKCON:... World: 1,000,000 world (1998); 8,000 full time (1998) "
ISKCON world - - 500
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "So far, 65 religious groups and associations have completed a questionnaire and are listed below... ISKCON now has 9 centres in Australia and 500 centres worldwide. "
ISKCON world 1,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance -
ISKCON - full-time Denmark 40 - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "Danish members of the Unification Church number (at the very most) around 40 after more than 20 years of missionary work in the country. ISKCON presents the same picture. The organization has around 40 regular devotees in Denmark, and some 150 people who are affiliated to the organization in one way or the other, although not on a full-time scale. "
ISKCON - full-time France 400 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "
ISKCON - full-time Germany 350 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "ISKCON (Hare Krishna) " in table. Source: REMID.; In comments column: "350 Devotees, mit befreundetem Umfeld ca. 5,000 " [ "50 DEVO teas, with friendly surrounding field approx. 5,000 "]
ISKCON - full-time Germany, West 100 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Total: 500; Full-time: 100; Part-time: 400.
ISKCON - full-time Germany, West 250 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. "Another more detailed assessment for West Germany covering many more movements concludes that well over one million people are involved or 'influenced' by new religions, with a 'full-time' membership of 64,200. The estimated full time membership for 12 of these movements is: " [table]
ISKCON - full-time Italy 500 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Total: 2,000; Full-time: 500; Sympathizers: 30,000.
ISKCON - full-time Netherlands 150 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Total: 250; Full-time: 150; Sympathizers: 20,000.
ISKCON - full-time Sweden 100 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Total: 500; Full-time: 100; Part-time: 400.
ISKCON - full-time United Kingdom: Britain 600 - - - 1985 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Adherents.com] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... ISKCON: Britain:... [Notes from author: "...an Indian informant they're expressed in numbers of families rather than individuals - 200-300 families of initiated devotees (which probably includes a fairly high proportion of celibates) and 10,000 families of life members - as well as people who attend the UK temples, for which they have no numbers, except that there were about 60,000 at the main temple to celebrate Krishna's birthday last year. "]
ISKCON - full-time United Kingdom: Britain 300 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Listed in table as "ISKCON (Hare Krishna) "
ISKCON - full-time USA 1,000 - - - 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 230. "From American college and university campuses more than a thousand men and women have renounced the ordinary pursuits of life and have taken up their abode in the temples as brahmacharis. "


ISKCON - full-time, continued

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