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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to International Pentecostal Church of Christ, world

International Pentecostal Church of Christ, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
International Pentecostal Church of Christ world 160,000 - 1,800
units
8
countries
1997 *LINK* web page: "Our Progress: A Short History of the International Pentecostal Church of Christ " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999); "Last Updated December 15, 1997 by Clyde M. Hughes, General Overseer " "Currently, the IPCC has churches or ministers in 18 states; it has 1800 churches in 8 nations; and approximately 160,000 members worldwide. "
International Pentecostal Holiness Church USA 112,000 - 1,460
units
- 1986 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Holiness Pentecostals; pg. 240-241. Church reporting.
International Pentecostal Holiness Church USA 131,674 - - - 1990 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "International Pentecostal Holiness Church. "
International Pentecostal Holiness Church USA 137,313 - 1,582
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). -
International Pentecostal Holiness Church USA 157,163 - 1,653
units
- 1995 *LINK* web site for Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches (accessed 1998); [Orig. source: Source: Kenneth B. Bedell, editor, Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches, annual.] Table: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches: U.S. Religious Bodies with more than 60,000 Members "; "...prepared for the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census... for the 1997 edition of the Statistical Abstract of the U.S. "
International Pentecostal Holiness Church USA 157,163 - 1,653
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
International Pentecostal Holiness Church USA 170,382 - 1,681
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Intl. Pentecostal Holiness Church
International Pentecostal Holiness Church world 378,538 - - - 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). -
Internet-based religion USA - 20.00% - - 2010 *LINK* Gibson, David (RNS). "Is the New Christianity No Longer About 'We' and All About 'Me'? " in Salt Lake Tribune (15 Jan 2000). "According to one survey, eight in 10 Americans say the Internet plays a role in their spiritual lives, and in another close to 20% say they will rely 'primarily or exclusively on the Internet for religious input' by 2010. Combine that with the Gallup poll showing that seven in 10 Americans believe you can be religious without going to church and we begin to see the outlines of a high-tech religion in which 'worshippers' sit alone in front of computers or flat-screen TVs at the time of their choice and commune to the rhythms of a 'faith' whose tenets they have chosen from a menu of options. "
Interstate & Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists Association Alabama 1,926 0.05% 12
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 1,499. [Listed as 'Interstate -- Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists.']
Interstate & Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists Association Florida 111 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 89. [Listed as 'Interstate -- Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists.']
Interstate & Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists Association Louisiana 4,125 0.10% 30
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 3,183. [Listed as 'Interstate -- Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists.']
Interstate & Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists Association Mississippi 12,055 0.47% 85
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 9,298. [Listed as 'Interstate -- Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists.']
Interstate & Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists Association Texas 76 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 59. [Listed as 'Interstate -- Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists.']
Interstate & Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists Association Texas 59 0.00% - - 1990 Ramos, Mary G. (ed). 1996-1997 Texas Almanac. Dallas, TX: Dallas Morning News (1995). [Source: Glenmary: "Churches & Church Membership in the U.S., 1990 "]; pg. 325-327. Table: "Religious Groups, Members/Adherents, In Texas, 1990 "; pg. 7: Texas pop. (1990 U.S. census): 16,986,335; "Data based on reports from 133 church bodies. "; This figure is from MEMBERS column ( "Members " in this study includes only communicant, confirmed members with full membership status), not the more inclusive "adherents " column.
Interstate & Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists Association Texas 76 0.00% - - 1990 Ramos, Mary G. (ed). 1996-1997 Texas Almanac. Dallas, TX: Dallas Morning News (1995). [Source: Glenmary: "Churches & Church Membership in the U.S., 1990 "]; pg. 325-327. Table: "Religious Groups, Members/Adherents, In Texas, 1990 "; pg. 7: Texas pop. (1990 U.S. census): 16,986,335; "Data based on reports from 133 church bodies. "; This figure is from ADHERENT column ( "Adherents " defined as all members, incl. regular participants not considered as communicant.), not the more restrictive "member " column.
Interstate & Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists Association USA 18,293 - 129
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Interstate -- Foreign Landmark Missionary Baptists.']
Inuit Alaska 12,500 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 832. "...the Eskimo... At the present time they number some 50,000, of whom approximately half are to be found in Greenland and the rest fairly evenly divided between Canada and Alaska. "
Inuit Alberta 450 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit British Columbia 240 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit Canada 12,500 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 832. "...the Eskimo... At the present time they number some 50,000, of whom approximately half are to be found in Greenland and the rest fairly evenly divided between Canada and Alaska. "
Inuit Canada 29,455 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit Canada 35,000 - - - 1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 315. "The Canadian Census of 1991 counted a total of 1,016,335 Native North Americans, including about 500,000 North American Indians; 480,000 Metis and nonstatus Indians; and approximatley 35,000 Inuit. "
Inuit Greenland 25,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 832. "...the Eskimo... At the present time they number some 50,000, of whom approximately half are to be found in Greenland... "
Inuit Manitoba 240 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit New Brunswick 55 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit Newfoundland 2,615 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit Northwest Territories 18,370 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit Nova Scotia 80 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit Nunavut 21,250 85.00% - - 1999 Associated Press. "Celebrations begin for creation of Canada's new territory " in Dallas Morning News (Thursday, April 1, 1999); pg. 10A. "Nunavut is being created out of the eastern 60% of the Northwest Territories, culminating 20 years of lobbying by Inuit leaders. About 85% of Nunavut's 25,000 people are Inuit. "
Inuit Ontario 530 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit Prince Edward Island 10 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit Quebec 6,780 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit Saskatchewan 55 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "; NOTE: These figures represent ethnic/tribal affiliation, not stated religious preference.
Inuit USA 12,500 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 832. "...the Eskimo... At the present time they number some 50,000, of whom approximately half are to be found in Greenland and the rest fairly evenly divided between Canada and Alaska. "
Inuit USA 57,152 0.02% - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 17. "In 1990, through the Census Bureau's system of self-identifying, there were 1,959,234 individuals identified as Indians, including Alaska Natives. This is 0.8% of the total U.S. population of 248,709,873. The 'Indian' population breaks down ethnologically as 23,797 Aleuts, 57,152 Eskimos, and 1,878,284 Indians. "
Inuit world 35,000 - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 161. "Presently there are about 35,000 Eskimos living in the Arctic. "
Inuit world 50,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 832. "Primarily a coastal people, the Eskimo occupy an area extending from Greenland and Labrador in the east to the Bering Sea in the west; some groups live on the Siberian shore of the Bering Straits. At the present time they number some 50,000, of whom approximately half are to be found in Greenland and the rest fairly evenly divided between Canada and Alaska. "
Inuit world 90,000 - - 3
countries
1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 244. "Inuit: Alternate names: Eskimo; Location: United States (Alaska); Canada (Greenland); Aleutian Islands; Russia (Siberia); Population: 90,000; Religion: Traditional animism; Christianity "; "Missionaries introduced various forms of Christianity, including Russian Orthodoxy, Catholicism, Anglicanism, and Lutheranism; these have largely replaced traditional Inuit religious practices, although many of the traditional animistic beliefs still linger. As with most hunting cultures, many traditional Inuit customs and taboos were intended to mollify the souls of hunted animals, such as polar bears, whales, walrus, and seals... "
Inuit Yukon 30 - - - 1991 *LINK* 1991 Census Highlights of Registered Indians: Annotated Tables, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (1995); pg. 3. Table 1.0: "Ethnic Composition of the Aboriginal Population: Canada, Provinces and Territories, 1991 Census "
Invisible College Kansas 40 - - - 1999 Email response from Bruce Nelson (eleusis@sprintmail.co), the contact mentioned on the Classical Religion Society web site. Received 8 Feb. 1999. "The Classical Religion Society is a branch of the Invisible College which is based here in Kansas and has about 40 members... The college has another 70 members who live ouside of Kansas City in different states and foreign countries. "
Invisible College world 110 - - - 1999 Email response from Bruce Nelson (eleusis@sprintmail.co), the contact mentioned on the Classical Religion Society web site. Received 8 Feb. 1999. "The Classical Religion Society is a branch of the Invisible College which is based here in Kansas and has about 40 members. The College sponsors a number of practice and study groups in areas such as Neoplatonism, Tibetan Buddhism, Contemplative Christianity, and the Hermetic tradition in addition to its interests in the Greek and Roman traditions... The college has another 70 members who live ouside of Kansas City in different states and foreign countries. "
Invisible Empire, Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Connecticut 50 - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 49. "The Invisible Empire, Knights of the Ku Klux Klan... this faction is now based in Connecticut... Its active membership in Connecticut is down to only about fifty members... "
Invisible Empire, Knights of the Ku Klux Klan USA 2,000 - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 49. "There are more than a dozen splinter [KKK] organizations. The major ones are as follows:... The Invisible Empire, Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. Previously based in Louisiana and responsible for violent acts during the turbulent civil rights years, this faction is now based in Connecticut and represents the only national Klan with a significant membership outside the South. Its active membership in Connecticut is down to only about fifty members (but 1,500 - 2,000 nationally), yet Imperial Wizard James Farrands is making a notable effort to link up with other hate groups around the country. In early 1988 at an Invisible Empire rally in Texas, Klansmen were joined by a group of Dallas skinheads. Their goal: 'Racial purity--we believe that all civilizations were the result of the White Race and that the fall of civilization in the past resulted because of the decline of the racial purity of the culture--the WHITE RACE.' "
Iowa Kansas 1,500 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 45. "Today, there are about 1,500 Iowa in Kansas, and more than 400 in Oklahoma. "
Iowa North America 1,100 - - - 1760 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 45. Estimates of total population from another source.
Iowa North America - Central Prairies and Woodlands 1,200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Iowa Oklahoma 400 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 45. "Today, there are about 1,500 Iowa in Kansas, and more than 400 in Oklahoma. "
Iowa world 1,200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Iowa world 1,900 - - 1
country
1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 45. "Today, there are about 1,500 Iowa in Kansas, and more than 400 in Oklahoma. "
Iroquois North America 60,000 - - - 1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 250, 252. "Iroquois: Location: United States (New York, Wisconsin); Canada (Quebec, Ontario); Population: 60,000 (US and Canada); Religion: Traditional tribal religions "; Pg. 252: "European missionaries of many denominations established missions among the Iroquois in the 1600s and attempted to convert them to Christianity. Many Iroquois have since become Christian or combined Christianity with their traditional beliefs. Today, some Iroquois remain purely traditional, but the majority are Christian. "
Iroquois North America - Eastern Woodlands 16,000 - - - 1670 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Iroquois (Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onandaga, and Seneca) (1670): 16,000 "
Iroquois USA - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1455. "Although the majority of Iroquois are now Christian, there is a remnant whose beliefs and culture are based on the visions of the prophet Handsome Lake. "
Iroquois USA 49,038 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Iroquois USA 49,038 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Iroquois USA - New England - - - - 1550 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1455. "The origins of the Iroquois, the most advanced group of American Indians north of the Pueblos, are lost in the confusion of archeological time. Their legends assume that they were always in their historical homeland of New England... The two great law-givers of the Iroquois lived at the time when Elizabeth I was ruling in England and the great Mogul, Akbar, was ruling in India... In those days the life of those Iroquois was not unlike that of Europeans at the end of Neolithic times, about 4000 years ago... An Iroquois philosopher and law-maker, who later became a demigod, Hiawatha lived during the 16th century... "
Iroquois world 16,000 - - - 1650 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1456. "...Dekanawida and Hiawatha came together... persuaded the tribal councils to come in peace to a series of conferences... the whole five nations joined into a league of mutual friendship and protection which they called 'The Extended Lodge', meaning that the Council Lodges of each nation were now joined together. The five nations now controlled the area from the shores of Lake Erie to the lower reaches of the Hudson River, the greater part of New York State. Yet a century later, at the time of their greatest power, their total population was only about 16,000. "
Iroquois world 16,000 - - - 1670 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Iroquois (Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onandaga, and Seneca) (1670): 16,000 "
Isaa Djibouti - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Isis worship Egypt - - - - -400 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1461. "Isis' ancient role as throne goddess, the Queen of Egypt was perpetuated among the Greek kings... The Isis religion therefore had a political element, it was the national religion of the Egyptian state: those who worshipped Isis and Serapis acknowledged their loyalty to the reigning royal house. "
Isis worship Egypt - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 34. "Much more powerful as a rival to Christianity were the mystery religions that were quite numerous & rapidly spreading during this period. They were syncretistic kinds of faiths that fused Hellenic & Oriental thought. The most important ones were the Dionysian & Orphic mysteries of Thrace; the Eleusinian from Eleusis, near Athens; the religion of the Great Mother, Cybele, from Anatolia in Asia Minor; the Persian religion of Mithra and the Egyptian cult of Isis & Osiris. "
Isis worship Nubia - - - - 298 C.E. *LINK* web site: "Joseph Schaffner Library: Resources for History B94: History of Ancient Egypt "; web page: "Nubia: The Land Upriver " (viewed 21 April 1999). "The Blemmyes... were a fierce nomadic tribal people from the mountainous regions of the Eastern Desert in Nubia... Under the Emperor Diocletian, [the Romans] evacuated the Dodekaschoenus in ca. AD 298, officially ceding it to the Nubadae, as guardians of Egypt's southern frontier. This ultimately allowed the Blemmyes to establish a kingdom of their own in northern Lower Nubia. The Blemmyes had adopted the ancient pharaonic religion, and after Egypt's conversion to Christianity, they fought the Romans and Upper Egyptians on religious grounds... By the fourth century AD, Lower Nubia was divided between the Nubadae in the south and the Blemmyes in the north... However, as the Blemmyes were devoted to the goddess Isis, Marcian permitted them continued access to the Temple of Isis at Philae in order to worship there. Both the Blemmyes and the Nubadae continued to worship at Philae long after Egypt had converted to Christianity. "
Isis worship Rhode Island - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* web site: "House of Netjer " (viewed Dec.1998) "Kemetic Orthodox following today is small... in the world, we know only of 2 temples...: the House of Netjer and Ordo Servorum Isidis... Ordo Servorum Isidis has no connection with the House of Netjer... Based in Rhode Island... "
Isis worship Roman Empire - - - - -80 B.C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 10. "The great majority of those who felt religious longings simply adopted Oriental religions... The most popular of these Oriental religions were those of the Great Mother (Cybele) and Attis, originating in Asia Minor; of Isis and Serapis from Egypt; and of Mithras from Persia... That of Isis and Serapis, with its emphasis on regeneration and a future life, was well established in Rome by B.C. 80, but had long to endure governmental opposition. "
Isis worship Roman Empire - - - - -50 B.C.E. Casson, Lionel. Ancient Egypt. New York: Time-Life Books (1965); pg. 163. "Under such unpromising circumstances, Egypt was once again able to leave its mark upon history. The First Century B.C., and the several centuries that followed, was an age in which people throughout the Mediterranean world were in desperate search of a religious experience that could offer them some hope and comfort. The story of the great Egyptian deities, Osiris... Isis... and Horus... proved to possess universal appeal. The emphasis on immortality in the worship of this ideal family trinity gained numerous devotees throughout the length and breadth of the Roman Empire, from the ancient Near East to far-off Britain. "


Isis worship, continued

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