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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Iglesia ni Cristo, world

Iglesia ni Cristo, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Iglesia ni Cristo world 10,000,000 - - 68
countries
1996 *LINK* web site: "Catholic Answer "; opposing or NON-OBJECTIVE web page: "Iglesia Ni Cristo " (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); Last modified May 25, 1996. "...in some 67 countries outside the Philippines... The exact number of members is uncertain because the Iglesia keeps that a secret, but it is estimated to be between 3 and 10 million world-wide... vast majority of Iglesia's members... are Filipino. "
Iglesia ni Cristo world - except Philippines - - 220
units
67
countries
1988 *LINK* web site: "Let Us Reason Ministries "; OPPOSING VIEW web page: "INC: Who Are They? " (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Igleslia Ni Christo means Church Of Christ (in Philipino)... today they have expanded to at least 220 congregations in 67 countries outside the Philippines... in 1988 they reported 220 congregations outside the Philippines... "
Iglesia ni Cristo world - except Philippines - - 200
units
- 1996 *LINK* web site: "Catholic Answer "; opposing or NON-OBJECTIVE web page: "Iglesia Ni Cristo " (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); Last modified May 25, 1996. "Since it was founded in the Philippines in 1914, it has grown to the point that it boasts over 200 congregations in some 67 countries outside the Philippines, including a large and expanding contingent in the U.S. "
Iglesias Guarani nandeva Paraguay 525 - 6
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " PARAGUAY... Iglesias Guarani nandeva; Members: 525; Congregations: 6
Igorot Philippines 1,100,000 2.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Cordillera (Philippines) " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "CORDILLERA (PHILIPPINES)... Cordillera is situated on the island of Luzon, one of the main islands of the Republic of Philippines between the South-China Sea to the West and the Pacific Ocean in the East. Area... The Cordillera people are indigenous Igorots. The population of the Cordillera is 1.1 million, about 2% of the Philippine population. Languages: There are seven ethno-linguistic groups in five provinces which have a common background and language called Ilocano. Organisations: The Cordillera Peoples Alliance (CPA) on the Philippines represents Cordilleras in UNPO. It is a federation of more than 120 organisations of the indigenous peoples of the Cordillera. Its major aim is to unite the Igorot people to fight a common cause. "
Igreja Baptista Livre em Angola Angola 16,432 - 33
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Igreja Evangelica Irmaos Mennonitas em Angola Angola 2,600 - 20
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Africa: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " "ANGOLA: Igreja Evangelica Irmaos Mennonitas em Angola?Members (1990): 2,600+/-; Congregations: 20 "
Igreja Evangelica Pentecostal Brazil 1,000,000 - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 133. "Of the total of about 30 million adherents of Pentecostal Churches, the largest number in any one country is in Brazil where one Church alone, the Assembleias de Deus, counts four million members, and where the Igreja Evangelica Pentecostal -- a member-Church of the World Council of Churches -- counts one million. "
Igreja Pentecostal Deus e Amor world - - - 31
countries
1995 *LINK* Nascimento, Elma Lia. "Praise the Lord and pass the catch-up ", "news from Brazil, November 1995; dateline: Brazzil ". (viewed 30 July 1999, web site: RickRoss.com) "Another Brazilian church, Deus e Amor, has already spread to 30 other countries, but the 33-year old church has had a steady and slow expansion, nothing that compares to the Universal's boom. "; [English full name: "God is Love " Pentecostal Church]
Ijan Nigeria - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Ijo Nigeria 2,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 211-212. "Ijo: Location: Niger River delta (coastal region of southern Nigeria); Population: 2 million; Religion: Traditional tribal religion "; Pg. 212: "The traditional Ijo believe in a High God, called Wonyingi ('our mother'), who created and controls the destiny of everything on earth. An individual's spirit is believed to meet with Wonyingi before birth to make an agreement or contract for the person to live a particular life. "
Ikhwan al-Safa Iraq - - - - 950 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 337. "Ikhwan al-Safa. (Arab.; lit. 'brethren of purity'). A secret philosophical-religious society which arose in the tenth century at Basra, in Iraq. They were associated with the Batini Ismailis... The Brethren injected into this propaganda a new scientific and philosophical spirit and dedicated themselves to enlightening and spiritually purifying themselves. "
Ila Zambia - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Illinois Illinois 200 - - - 1854 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 31. "Illinois... They lived along the western border of what is the present state of Illinois. Most tribal settlements were scattered along the Illinois River... Allied with the French, they were crushed by the Five Nations Iroquois in 1684. When the great Ottawa chief, Pontiac, was killed by an Illinois in 1769, the Kickapoo declared war. Only a few hundred Illinois survived. After selling their land, they went into exile in Kansas. In 1854, a treaty grouped the Peoria, Kaskaskia, Miami, Wea, and Piankashaw tribes on an Oklahoma reservation. Population figures were estimated at about 200. "
Illinois North America - Central Prairies and Woodlands 8,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Illinois world 8,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Ilongot Philippines 2,500 - - - 1975 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 283-284. "Ilongot: Alternate Names: Bugkalut; Location: Philippines (northern Luzon); Population: 2,500 (1970s); Religion: Native beliefs; Protestantism "; "Since the 1950s, Protestant missionaries have been making conversions among the Ilongot. "
Inca Latin America - - - - 1500 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "INCA RELIGION: much of what is known of Inca religion comes from Spanish sources and archaeological evidence. The Inca appear to have WORSHIPED a CREATOR GOD who had no name but was given a series of titles. Numerous other DEITIES also existed and were worshiped. Ceremonies were held in large areas in the open air and TEMPLES were used to store RITUAL paraphernalia. Many PRIESTS and attendants served the religion which involved large public ceremonies and constant SACRIFICE. Human victims--mainly women and children--appear to have been sacrificed in times of crisis. "
Inca Peru - - - - 1100 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1423. "Within four centuries the Inca family expanded from rulers of part of a small town to a semi-divine tribe of which the head, the Sapa Inca, ruled an immense empire, which they termed Tahuantinsuyu, the Four Quarters, to imply that their father the sun god destined them to rule the entire known earth. In the mid-11th century, about the time of the Norman Conquest of Britain, a family of American Indians came from the Esat and ascended the mountains into a civilized country which had broken up into warring tribal groups... They were allowed to rule half of the town which they now named The Cuzco, and although they were respected because of the mystery of their origin, it was not until the reign of their great-grandson that the Incas ruled the whole of the town. This must have been in the first half of the 12th century of our era. At the time of the Inca arrival Peru was divided... "
Inca Peru - - - - 1500 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "
Inca Peru - - - - 1533 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1424. "In a series of outstanding raids and unexpected attacks the Inca forces destroyed the Chanca confederacy and Inca Viracocha found himself in command of all the mountain tribes around Cuzco. In another generation the Incas spread their rule over the whole Peruvian part of the Andes, including the sacred though ruined ancient city of Tiahuanaco... The Chimu were permitted to worship their own gods, but every temple had to support an oratory to the sun which made it quite clear that his children, the Incas, were the real rulers of the country... The capture of the Chimu kingdom made the Inca masters of all the civilized areas of Peru... the Spaniards arrived. In a short campaign they captured Atahuallpa, and murdered him; but not before he had Huascar, the true heir, killed. Thus in 1533 fell the divine sun kingdom of the Incas. "
Inca South America 16,000,000 - - - 1532 C.E. Bleacher, Sonia. The Inca: Indians of the Andes. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1960); pg. 24, 26. Pg. 24: "By 1532, when the Spaniards arrived, the Incas had developed one of the three great civilizations in South America... "; Pg. 26: "For greater convenience the Inca had divided the Empire into four slices, and each of these men [four wise men of royal blood] presided over a province... The Inca called their Empire Tahuantinsuya -- the Land of the Four Quarters. The population of the Land... was between 8 and 16 million. It included thriving, hard-working farmers, outstanding potters, weavers of fine textiles, craftsmen who worked in gold and silver... Quecha, the language of the Inca, was the dominating language of this Empire, and Inca had put its stamp on everything. "
Inca South America 6,000,000 - - - 1532 C.E. McIntyre, Loren. The Incredible Incas and Their Timeless Lands. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society (1975); pg. 8, 12-13. Pg. 8: "Their love of precious metals was esthetic, for neither Incas nor their subjected needed to buy anything. Six million or more worshipful people rendered abundant tribute to the Incas and paid their taxes in work... "; pg. 12-13: "The empire dawned about 1438... Finally, in 1532, Francisco Pizarro led a small band of Spaniards into the Inca Empire. "
Inca world 3,500,000 - - - 1100 C.E. Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 188. "...Incas. This largest of the Indian domains began as a military power about A.D. 1000 in the highlands of Peru. In 1100 the first Inca ruler recorded by history took the throne, and for the next four hundred years the Inca empire expanded its territory and intensified its rule until the realm became known as the 'four quarters of the world.' It must have seemed just that to the more than 3,500,000 Indians who made up the Inca nation. By 1500 it extended from Ecuador far south into what is nowArgentina. At the height of its power it stretched 2,000 miles along the high plateaus of the Andes and the coastal plains of the Pacific Ocean, covering 380,000 square miles...'
Inca world 12,000,000 - - - 1500 C.E. Carmody, Denise Lardner & John Tully Carmody, Native American Religion: An Introduction, Paulist Press: New York, NY (1993); pg. 257. "When whites encountered the Inca in the sixteenth century this empire stretched along the Pacific from the north of Ecuador to central Chile, controlling perhaps twelve millionn people. "
Independent Assemblies of God International Brazil 500,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 190. "Independent Assemblies of God, International... It is claimed that their missionary church in Brazil is the largest Protestant church in that country, having 'close to half a million followers.' There are also 200 millionaries in the Philippines... There are 800 churches, 1,800 ministers and evangelists... "
Independent Assemblies of God International Brazil 500,000 - - - 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). "...close to half a million followers [in Brazil] "
Independent Assemblies of God International Canada - - 214
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 694. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Independent Assemblies of God Intl. (Canada)
Independent Assemblies of God International USA - - 800
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 190. "Independent Assemblies of God, International... It is claimed that their missionary church in Brazil is the largest Protestant church in that country, having 'close to half a million followers.' There are also 200 millionaries in the Philippines... There are 800 churches, 1,800 ministers and evangelists... "
Independent Assemblies of God International world - - 300
units
- 1975 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Latter Rain Pentecostals; pg. 285-286. "Independent Assemblies of God International... Membership: Not reported. In the mid-1970s there were approximately 300 congregations affiliated with the Assemblies. "
Independent Baptist Church of America world 130 - 8
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 367. "A group of 8 Scandinavian Baptist churches, holding the common Baptist doctrines, but stressing 'the laying on of hands,' pacifism, and the second coming of Christ. They have about 130 members. "
Independent Brethren Church Pennsylvania - - 2
units
1
country
1972 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Brethren; pg. 317. "Independent Brethren Church was formed in 1972... the Upper Marsh Creek congregation at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, of the Church of the Brethren withdrew and became an independent body. Later that year, members from the Antietam congregation left and established the independent Blue Rock congregation near Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. These two congregations unted as the Independent Brethren Church... "
Independent Brethren Church Pennsylvania 85 - 2
units
1
country
1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 317. "Membership: In 1980 the Independent Brethren Church had approximately 85 members in two congregations. "
Independent Church South Africa: Johannesburg - - - - 1981 Gibbs, Richard. Living in Johannesburg (series: "Living in Famous Cities "). East Sussex, England: Wayland Publishers (1981); pg. 38-39. "Johannesburg is a city rich in religion... The majority of the blacks are Christians... The Independent Church has the largest following, but very few churches. Members, identified by their blue and white robes, gather and hold services wherever a few of them get together. Street corners, backyards, waste grounds -- all can serve as a suitable site. The Church's doctrine is a blend of Christianity and traditional African tribal religion... "
Independent Church of Australia world 250 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site of the Independent Church of Australia (viewed circa Aug. 1998); [Note: When I revisited this site 27 Feb. 1999 I could no longer find mention of the organization's size] Christianity:
"Only two hundred and fifty members active throughout Australia and New Zealand. "
Independent Ecumenical Catholic Church world 200 - 4
units
- 1977 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 76. "Independent Ecumenical Catholic Church (Shotts); (Defunct)... Membership: In 1977 the church reported four churches, 200 members, and eight ordained clergy. "
Independent Ecumenical Catholic Church world 0 - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 76. "Independent Ecumenical Catholic Church (Shotts); (Defunct)... Membership: In 1977 the church reported four churches, 200 members, and eight ordained clergy. However, in 1979 Shotts, who had been charged in a child molestation case, also abandoned the church and placed himself under Archbishop Edward Stelik of the North American Old Catholic Church... The Independent Ecumenical Catholic Church is presumed to have disolved. "
Independent Evangelical Church of Neuchatel world - - 40
units
- 1865 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 527. "Neuchatel, Independent Evangelical Church of: (organized 1873) has its origin in the preaching of Farel in the canton of Neuchatel... About 1865 the state seriously curtailed the freedom of the Synod... There were then 40 churches. "
Independent Fundamental Churches of America USA 69,587 - 670
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Independent Fundamental Churches of America
Independent Holiness Church Canada 600 - 13
units
- 1987 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 244-247. Table 1: Canadian Current Statistics. (# of adherents is from table's "inclusive membership " column, not the sometimes smaller "full communicant or confirmed members " col.) Listed in table as "Independent Holiness Church. "
Independent Holiness Church Canada - - 12
units
- 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 212. "Independent Holiness Church... Sydenham, ON, Canada [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1987 the church had 13 congregations (12 in Canada and one in the U.S.), and approximately 250 members. "
Independent Holiness Church North America 250 - 13
units
- 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 212. "Independent Holiness Church... Sydenham, ON, Canada [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1987 the church had 13 congregations (12 in Canada and one in the U.S.), and approximately 250 members. "
Independent Holiness Church USA - - 1
unit
- 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 212. "Independent Holiness Church... Sydenham, ON, Canada [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1987 the church had 13 congregations (12 in Canada and one in the U.S.), and approximately 250 members. "
Independent Lutheran Church Germany 39,200 - - - 1997 *LINK* web page: "Religion News of the World "; collected by Ph. Keulemans - Update: 30/11/1998. (viewed 5 July 1999). Date section: November 25 [1998]: "Membership Dwindles in almost all German Protestant Churches " [Orig. source: Idea/GC] "the Independent Lutheran Church... survey conducted by the evangelical news agency idea (Wetzlar)... The Independent Lutherans decreased by 4.2% to 39,200... "
Independent Lutheran Church Germany 44,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Selbständige Evangelisch-Lutherische Kirche " in table. Source: REMID. Independent Evangelical Lutherans: MOST are members of Evangelische Kirche in Deutschland churches.
Independent Methodists, Association of USA - - 5
units
- 1965 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 187. "...organized in 1965 in Jackson, Mississippi... Membership: From a beginning with five churches... "
Independent Methodists, Association of USA 3,000 - 33
units
- 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 187-188. "...the Association in 1987 reported more than 3,000 members in 33 congregations with 47 ministers licensed or ordained by the association. All of the congregations are located in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. "
Independent Methodists, Association of world - - 5
units
1
country
1965 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 187. "Association of Independent Methodists... Jackson, MS [H.Q.]... organized in 1965 in Jackson, Mississippi, by former members of the Methodist Church... Membership: From a beginning with five churches... "
Independent Methodists, Association of world 3,000 - 33
units
1
country
1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 187-188. "Association of Independent Methodists... Jackson, MS [H.Q.]... Membership: From a beginning with five churches, the Association in 1987 reported more than 3,000 members in 33 congregations with 47 ministers licensed or ordained by the association. All of the congregations are located in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. "
Independent Old Roman Catholic Hungarian Orthodox Church of America Canada 100 - - - 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 77. "Independent Old Roman Catholic Hungarian Orthodox Church of America... Membership: In 1988 the Church reported eight congregations, 13 clergy and approx. 300 members in the U.S. and the [sic; the = three?] congregations and more than 100 members in Canada. "
Independent Old Roman Catholic Hungarian Orthodox Church of America North America 400 - 11
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 77. "Independent Old Roman Catholic Hungarian Orthodox Church of America... Membership: In 1988 the Church reported eight congregations, 13 clergy and approx. 300 members in the U.S. and the [sic; the = three?] congregations and more than 100 members in Canada. "
Independent Old Roman Catholic Hungarian Orthodox Church of America USA 300 - 8
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 77. "Independent Old Roman Catholic Hungarian Orthodox Church of America... Membership: In 1988 the Church reported eight congregations, 13 clergy and approx. 300 members in the U.S... "
Independent Old Roman Catholic Hungarian Orthodox Church of America world 400 - 11
units
2
countries
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 77. "Independent Old Roman Catholic Hungarian Orthodox Church of America... Membership: In 1988 the Church reported eight congregations, 13 clergy and approx. 300 members in the U.S. and the [sic; the = three?] congregations and more than 100 members in Canada. "
Independent Orthodox Church in America Africa - - - - 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: House of Bishops (viewed 18 April 2005) Bishops in Africa:

Diocese of Africa
Most Reverend Dr. Solomon Okoro, SGS
Republic of Benin
African ministry

Independent Orthodox Church in America Arizona - - 1
unit
- 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: Clergy (viewed 18 April 2005) Clergy List: Bishops, Priests, Deacons, Brothers, and Sisters: AZ: Fr Vinson
Independent Orthodox Church in America Benin - - - - 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: House of Bishops (viewed 18 April 2005) Bishops in Africa:

Diocese of Africa
Most Reverend Dr. Solomon Okoro, SGS
Republic of Benin
African ministry

Independent Orthodox Church in America California - - 3
units
- 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: Clergy (viewed 18 April 2005) Clergy List: Bishops, Priests, Deacons, Brothers, and Sisters: CA: Fr Robert, Bishop David, Sister Juliet
Independent Orthodox Church in America California - - - - 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: House of Bishops (viewed 18 April 2005) Bishops in California:

The Most Reverend +David Pascua
Bishop Ordinary of the Missionary Diocese of St. George
Independent Orthodox Church in America

Independent Orthodox Church in America Connecticut - - 1
unit
- 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: Clergy (viewed 18 April 2005) Clergy List: Bishops, Priests, Deacons, Brothers, and Sisters: CT: Fr Michael
Independent Orthodox Church in America Florida - - 2
units
- 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: Clergy (viewed 18 April 2005) Clergy List: Bishops, Priests, Deacons, Brothers, and Sisters: Fl: Brother Spencer, Bishop Zachariah
Independent Orthodox Church in America Florida - - - - 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: House of Bishops (viewed 18 April 2005) Bishops in Florida:

The Most Reverend?Mother Zachariah
Bishop Ordinary of the Diocese of Christ the King
Abbess-General of the Order of the Holy Spirit
Independent Orthodox Church in America

Independent Orthodox Church in America Georgia, USA - - 5
units
- 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: Clergy (viewed 18 April 2005) Clergy List: Bishops, Priests, Deacons, Brothers, and Sisters: GA: Bishop Aaron, Rev Brother Jacob, Brother Jeremy, Brother Scott, Sister Kimberly
Independent Orthodox Church in America Georgia, USA - - - - 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: House of Bishops (viewed 18 April 2005) Bishops in Georgia:

The Most Reverend +Aaron Evans, OJT, S.T.M.
Missionary Bishop of the Diocese of St. James
Abbot-General of the Poor Brothers and Sisters of Christ
Independent Orthodox Church in America

Independent Orthodox Church in America Hawaii - - 1
unit
- 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: Clergy (viewed 18 April 2005) Clergy List: Bishops, Priests, Deacons, Brothers, and Sisters: HI: Fr Deacon Pat
Independent Orthodox Church in America Illinois - - 1
unit
- 2005 *LINK* Website: Independent Orthodox Church in America; webpage: Clergy (viewed 18 April 2005) Clergy List: Bishops, Priests, Deacons, Brothers, and Sisters: IL: Rev Brian


Independent Orthodox Church in America, continued

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