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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

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Huchnom, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Huguenot Florida - - - - 1564 C.E. Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 24. "Among the very first European Christians in the New World were members of the Reformed chuch. As early as 1564, Huguenots (French Protestants), fleeing persecution, settled along the St. John's River near present-day Jacksonville, Florida. The colony was destroyed the next year by the Spanish who had already claimed the territory. "
Huguenot France - - - - 1598 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1369. "Huguenots: French Protestants of the 16th and 17th centuries who were branded as heretics and subjected to severe persecution by the Catholic authorities: defiantly resisting their oppressors in the wars of religion which ravaged France in the late 16th century, they were rewarded in 1598 with the Edict of Nantes which granted Huguenots freedom of conscience and full civil rights; the Edict was revoked in 1685 by Louis XIV and many Huguenots fled to England and Prussia. "
Huguenot France 300,000 - - - 1598 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 330. "Huguenot... The Edict [of Nantes] was revoked by Louis XIV in 1685, leading to a great exodus, estimated as more than 300,000, of Huguenots from France. A later edict gave freedom to Protestants in 1787. "
Huguenot France - 10.00% - - 1598 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 330. "Huguenot. A name of uncertain origin applied to the Reformed French Protestants... In 1598 [Henry IV] granted the Edict of Nantes that provided limited toleration for the Reformed, who probably numbered 10 percent of the population at that time. "
Huguenot France - - - - 1600 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 347. "The Reformed church in France was known as Huguenot... "
Huguenot France - - - - 1685 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "HUGUENOTS: French PROTESTANTS who followed John CALVIN. They suffered constant persecution and over 10,000 were slaughtered in the SAINT BARTHOLOMEW'S DAY MASSACRE. Later many more were expelled from France after the Edict of Nantes, which gave them religious FREEDOM, was revoked in 1685. Leaving their homeland, they made significant contributions to many countries where they found refuge. "
Huguenot Quebec - - - - 1749 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 24. "During the last half of the [16th] century, others [Huguenots] began to flee to the towns of New France along the St. Lawrence River. They continued to arrive until forbidden to migrate by Cardinal Richelieu in 1628. Huguenots did not prosper, but a few did survive in Canada until the fall of Quebec in 1759. They were soon absorbed into other Protestant churches. "
Huguenot United Kingdom: England - - - - 1685 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1369. "Huguenots: French Protestants... the Edict [of Nantes] was revoked in 1685 by Louis XIV and many Huguenots fled to England and Prussia. "
Huguenot USA - - 7
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); [Orig. source: Paullin (1932)]; pg. 25. Table 2.1: "Numbers of Congregations per Denomination, 1776 "
Hui China 5,000,000 0.48% - - 1982 McLenighan, Valjean. China (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1984); pg. 117. "The Uighurs, Kazakhs, and Kirghiz write and speak Turkic langauges. But the 4 or 5 million members of the Hui national minority all write and speak Chinese. Except for the fact that they are Muslims, there is little to distinguish the Hui from the Han. Though most Hui live in Ningsia (Ningxia) Autonomous Region, some live in Yunnan, Sinkiang, and the area between Peking and Wuhan. "
Hui China 8,107,000 0.67% - - 1996 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 8-9, 81. "Population: 1,210,000,000 (1996)... Ethnic Groups: Han Chinese, 92%; Zhuang, 1.33%; Mancu, .75%; Hui, .67%; Miao, .67%; Uygur, .58%; Yi, .57%; Tibetan, .42%; Mongol, .42% "; Pg. 81: "The Hui are Muslims, descendants of Chinese who adopted the religion of Islam when it entered China in the 7th century. The 8 million Hui make up 0.67 percent of the population. Most of them live in the Ningxia autonomous region and in smaller autonomous communities in the provinces of Gansu, Henan, and Hebei. The Hui use the Chinese language. "
Hui China: Ningxia - - - - 1996 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 81. "The Hui are Muslims, descendants of Chinese who adopted the religion of Islam when it entered China in the 7th century. The 8 million Hui make up 0.67 percent of the population. Most of them live in the Ningxia autonomous region and in smaller autonomous communities in the provinces of Gansu, Henan, and Hebei. The Hui use the Chinese language. "
Hui China: Shaanxi: Xi'an 60,000 - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 73-74. Pg. 73: "Xi'an, capital of Shaanxi Province "; Pg. 74: "Some 60,000 Hui Muslims live in Xi'an "
Human and Ethical Union Norway 49,428 - 157
units
- 1990 *LINK* Government statistics web site (viewed circa Nov. 1998) Table: "Religious and philosophical communities outside Church of Norway "
Human and Ethical Union Norway 64,322 - 120
units
- 1996 *LINK* Government statistics web site (viewed circa Nov. 1998) Table: "Religious and philosophical communities outside Church of Norway "
Humanism Australia 4,075 0.02% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "Humanism "]
Humanism Germany 40,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Freireligiöse, Freie Humanisten " in table. Source: REMID.
Humanism Netherlands - 25.00% - - 1993 O'Brien, J. & M. Palmer. The State of Religion Atlas. Simon & Schuster: New York (1993); pg. 108. "The proportion of people who call themselves humanists and who belong to humanist organizations is small, although a few states -- the Netherlands with 25% and Norway with 20% -- are obvious exceptions. "
Humanism Norway - 20.00% - - 1993 O'Brien, J. & M. Palmer. The State of Religion Atlas. Simon & Schuster: New York (1993); pg. 108. "The proportion of people who call themselves humanists and who belong to humanist organizations is small, although a few states -- the Netherlands with 25% and Norway with 20% -- are obvious exceptions. "
Humanism USA 275,000 - - - 1980 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998). [Orig. source: Tim LaHaye. The Battle for the Mind. (Old Tappan, NJ: Fleming H. Revell, 1980)]; pg. 70. "After naming the horrors they cause, LaHaye claims that there are only about 275,000 hard-core humansits... in the [U.S.]. They are far outnumbered by sixty million born-again Christians plus a generally moral nonevangelical public. "
Humanism USA 29,000 - - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 15-17. Table 1-2: Self-Described Adherence of U.S. Adult Population 1990. Phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by Graduate School of City U. of New York.
Huna Poland - - - - 1992 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 243-244. "In Poland he found (Maxwell, 1992:37) the following NRMs: 22 Zen Buddhist organizations; 13 Hindu orgs.; 2 Theosophical orgs; Hawaiian Kahuna, a magic movement... " [these are number of organizations, not necessarily be number of "units "]; [ "Kahuna ", a modern reformulation of Hawaiian traditional religion, is more commonly known as Huna.]
Hung Hsui-chuan China - - - - 1864 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1827. "In modern times, the messianic figures who have commanded the greatest following have appeared in non-Christian countries or among underdeveloped peoples. An example is Hung Hsui-chuan, the son of a Chinese peasant household who emerged as a visionary, after repeatedly failing the Civil Service examinations, and inspired the Taiping rebellion which began in southern China in 1851 and lasted until 1864, with Nanking as its capital for most of this period. "
Hungarian Baptist Union North America - - - - 1979 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 265. "Many ethnic Baptist groups swell the total of the fellowship in the United States: Finnish Baptist Union of America, French Baptist Conference, Hungarian Baptist Union, Italian Baptist Association, Polish Baptist Conference in the U.S.A. and Canada; Roumanian Baptist Association and the Czechoslovak Baptist Convention of America. "
Hungarian Reformed Church in America North America - - 7
units
- 1924 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 212. "Hungarian Reformed Church in America... With the break-up of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the resulting impoverishment of Hungary, the church in that country transferred jurisdiction of its U.S. churches to the Reformed Church in the U.S., in an agreement reached at Tiffin, Ohio, in 1921. Three of the original congregations, together with four others more recently organized, refused to accept the agreement; in 1924, they united to form the Free Magyar Reformed Church in America at Duquesne, Pennsylvania. The present name was adopted in 1958. "
Hungarian Reformed Church in America North America 10,500 - 31
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 212. "Hungarian Reformed Church in America... There are 31 congregations with 10,500 baptized members in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Arizona, the District of Columbia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Florida, California, and Ontario, Canada. "
Hungarian Reformed Church in America USA 9,780 - 27
units
- 1990 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Hungarian Reformed Church of America. "
Hungarian Reformed Church in America USA 9,780 - 27
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
Hungarian Reformed Church in America USA 9,780 - 27
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Hungarian Reformed Ch. in N. America
Hungarian Reformed Church in America world - - 7
units
- 1924 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 212. "3 of the original congregations, together with 4 others more... in 1924, they united to form the Free Magyar Reformed Church in America at Duquesne, Pennsylvania. The present name [Hungarian Reformed Church in America] was adopted in 1958. "
Hungarian Reformed Church in America world 11,000 - 30
units
- 1986 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 159. "Hungarian Reformed Church in America... Hipatcong, NJ [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1986 the Church reported 11,000 members, 30 congregations, and 42 ministers. "
Hungarian Reformed Church in America world 10,500 - 31
units
2
countries
1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 212. "Hungarian Reformed Church in America... There are 31 congregations with 10,500 baptized members in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Arizona, the District of Columbia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Florida, California, and Ontario, Canada. "
Hungarian Reformed Church in America world 8,600 - 31
units
2
countries
1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). U.S. and Canada
Hupa North America 1,000 - - - 1850 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 65. "Hupa... About 1,000 in the mid-19th century, their population has grown to more than 4,000 today. "
Hupa North America 4,000 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 65. "Hupa... About 1,000 in the mid-19th century, their population has grown to more than 4,000 today. "
Hupa North America - Pacific Coast 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Hupa world 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Hurufis Turkey 0 0.00% - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Naqshbandi.net "; web page: "HURIFISM/Baktashi " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999). "The word 'Baktashi' refers to two different groups of people... first group are true... Baktashis [who] follow... Hadrat Hajji Baktash-i Wali. [2nd] group of Baktashis are the fake... ones. These are Hurufis... Most of them were called 'Baktashi' in the past. In the course of time, they decreased in number and became non-existent. Nowadays, no fake... Baktashis exist in Turkey. "
Hussite Bohemia - - - - 1415 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 331. "Huss, John (Christian; 1372 or 1373-1415). A teacher at the University of Prague and a priest, Huss was influenced both by John Wycliffe and a native Czech reform movement. His powerful preaching led to his being recognized as the leader of the reform party in Bohemia... News of his death resulted in a revolution in Bohemia, where he was regarded as a martyr. the successful Hussites soon divided into two factions... "
Hussite Bohemia - - - - 1418 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 473. "The sectarian movements led by John Wyclif in England and John Huss in Bohemia were associated with the spirit of rising nationalism. Wyclif's followers, the Lollards, were largely suppressed, but those of Huss, who was burned at the stake in 1418, became so strong in Bohemia that eventually they were tolerated alongside the Catholics. This was the first example in the Christian West of religious pluralism, the recognition of more than one religion within a given territory. "
Hussite Czech Republic - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 331. "The Hussite heritage left Bohemia receptive to the Protestant Reformation, and succeeding generations of Czech Protestants have understood themselves as rooted in the work of Huss. "
Hussite Czech Republic 180,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.; Listed in table as "Czechoslovak Hussite "
Hussite Czech Republic - 1.70% - - 1998 *LINK* official government info web site Table; Listed in table as "Czech Hussite "
Hussite - Taborites Bohemia - - - - 1415 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 331. "Huss, John (Christian; 1372 or 1373-1415)... News of his death resulted in a revolution in Bohemia, where he was regarded as a martyr. the successful Hussites soon divided into two factions, the more extreme Taborites and the Utraquists... "
Hussite - Utraquists Bohemia - - - - 1415 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 331. "Huss, John (Christian; 1372 or 1373-1415)... News of his death resulted in a revolution in Bohemia, where he was regarded as a martyr. the successful Hussites soon divided into two factions, the more extreme Taborites and the Utraquists... A civil war allowed the Utraquists to negotiate a settlement through which the Bohemian church was once again in communion with Rome, while retaining the right to administer the cup to laity. "
Hutterian Brethren Canada - - - - 1919 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1376. "Even in the United States the Hutterians were not safe from persecution... when the United States entered the First World War in 1917, the Hutterians, as German-speaking pacificsts, encountered local social and political hostility... In the face of these threats the great majority of them migrated to Canada in 1918 and 1919. There, in Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan they have prospered economically and multiplied in number. "
Hutterian Brethren Canada 10,000 - 100
units
- 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1376. "Today, the Hutterians consist of... well over 100 colonies in Canada and about 50 in the U.S... Each individual colony has about 50 to 150 members, a figure that remains constant as, when a group grows to about 150 it divides and establishes a daughter colony. "
Hutterian Brethren Canada 20,000 - - - 1998 "Perils of Modern World Encroach Upon Amish " in Christian Century (July 15-22, 1998); pg. 673. "Hutterite community, which numbers about 20,000 in Alberta and elsewhere in Western Canada, plus another 40,000 in the U.S... "
Hutterian Brethren Canada 6,100 - 111
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "USA/Canada: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " Hutterian Brethren; Members: Canada - 18,900+/-; USA - 6,100+/-; Total - 25,000+/-; Congregations: Canada - 295 USA - 111; Total - 406
Hutterian Brethren Connecticut 225 0.01% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Hutterian Brethren.']
Hutterian Brethren Europe - - - - 1529 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1376. "Recruited from the Anabaptists, an amorphous and widespread body of dissenters in early 16th century Europe, the Hutterian Brethren, or Hutterites, came into being as a distinct religious group in the late 1520s. "
Hutterian Brethren Minnesota 400 0.01% 4
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Hutterian Brethren.']
Hutterian Brethren Montana 3,307 0.41% 40
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Hutterian Brethren.']
Hutterian Brethren New York 675 0.00% 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Hutterian Brethren.']
Hutterian Brethren North America - - 19
units
- 1914 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 235. "By World War I there were nineteen communities [of Hutterian Brethren]; by 1931, thirty-three; by 1950 they numbered 8,542 persons distributed in about ninety communites in the Dakotas, Montana, Manitoba, and Alberta. "
Hutterian Brethren North America - - 33
units
- 1931 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 235. "By World War I there were nineteen communities [of Hutterian Brethren]; by 1931, thirty-three; by 1950 they numbered 8,542 persons distributed in about ninety communites in the Dakotas, Montana, Manitoba, and Alberta. "
Hutterian Brethren North America 8,542 - 90
units
- 1950 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 235. "By World War I there were nineteen communities [of Hutterian Brethren]; by 1931, thirty-three; by 1950 they numbered 8,542 persons distributed in about ninety communites in the Dakotas, Montana, Manitoba, and Alberta. "
Hutterian Brethren North America 15,000 - 150
units
- 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1376. "Today, the Hutterians consist of... well over 100 colonies in Canada and about 50 in the U.S... Each individual colony has about 50 to 150 members, a figure that remains constant as, when a group grows to about 150 it divides and establishes a daughter colony. "
Hutterian Brethren North America 40,000 - 375
units
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 97. "There are 375 colonies with 40,000 members in North America "
Hutterian Brethren North America 25,000 - 406
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "USA/Canada: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " Hutterian Brethren; Members: Canada - 18,900+/-; USA - 6,100+/-; Total - 25,000+/-; Congregations: Canada - 295 USA - 111; Total - 406
Hutterian Brethren North America - - - - 2001 *LINK* AP. "Amish Thriving " in Salt Lake Tribune, 21 Apr 2001. PHILADELPHIA -- Amish communities and other isolated religious colonies are thriving by persuading their children to continue their largely preindustrial ways and remain with their churches, according to a new study. The Amish, the largest of four "Old Order " groups examined, keep more than 75 percent of their children in the fold, the study found. Hutterites, the nation's oldest rigidly communal Protestant order, persuade more than 95 percent of their young to remain in the large agricultural communes mostly in the northwestern United States and western Canada. Results from the 10-year study have been compiled in a book published this month, On the Backroad to Heaven.
Hutterian Brethren North Dakota 500 0.08% 5
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Hutterian Brethren.']
Hutterian Brethren Ohio 100 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Hutterian Brethren.']
Hutterian Brethren Oklahoma 100 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Hutterian Brethren.']
Hutterian Brethren Pennsylvania 450 0.00% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Hutterian Brethren.']


Hutterian Brethren, continued

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