Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to homosexual - couples heading households, California

homosexual - couples heading households, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
homosexual - couples heading households Georgia, USA 14,513 - - - 1990 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 362. "The U.S. government completed its first-ever attempt to enumerate the number of gay and lesbian couples in the nation as part of its 1990 census. Data suggests that there are 145,130 such couples heading housholds in this country. California had 25% of all those responding;... Georgia and Washington, 5% each. "
homosexual - couples heading households Idaho 4,934 - - - 1990 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 362. "The U.S. government completed its first-ever attempt to enumerate the number of gay and lesbian couples in the nation as part of its 1990 census. Data suggests that there are 145,130 such couples heading housholds in this country. California had 25% of all those responding... States wih the smallest percentages were Wyoming (0.6%), South Dakota (0.6%), and Idaho (1.7%). "
homosexual - couples heading households Massachusetts 19,157 - - - 1990 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 362. "The U.S. government completed its first-ever attempt to enumerate the number of gay and lesbian couples in the nation as part of its 1990 census. Data suggests that there are 145,130 such couples heading housholds in this country. California had 25% of all those responding; Massachusetts 6.6%... "
homosexual - couples heading households Minnesota 14,803 - - - 1990 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 362. "The U.S. government completed its first-ever attempt to enumerate the number of gay and lesbian couples in the nation as part of its 1990 census. Data suggests that there are 145,130 such couples heading housholds in this country. California had 25% of all those responding;... Minnesota 5.1%... "
homosexual - couples heading households New York 16,835 - - - 1990 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 362. "The U.S. government completed its first-ever attempt to enumerate the number of gay and lesbian couples in the nation as part of its 1990 census. Data suggests that there are 145,130 such couples heading housholds in this country. California had 25% of all those responding;... New York 5.8%... "
homosexual - couples heading households South Dakota 1,742 - - - 1990 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 362. "The U.S. government completed its first-ever attempt to enumerate the number of gay and lesbian couples in the nation as part of its 1990 census. Data suggests that there are 145,130 such couples heading housholds in this country. California had 25% of all those responding... States wih the smallest percentages were Wyoming (0.6%), South Dakota (0.6%), and Idaho (1.7%). "
homosexual - couples heading households USA 290,260 - - - 1990 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 362. "The U.S. government completed its first-ever attempt to enumerate the number of gay and lesbian couples in the nation as part of its 1990 census. Data suggests that there are 145,130 such couples heading housholds in this country. "
homosexual - couples heading households Washington 14,513 - - - 1990 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 362. "The U.S. government completed its first-ever attempt to enumerate the number of gay and lesbian couples in the nation as part of its 1990 census. Data suggests that there are 145,130 such couples heading housholds in this country. California had 25% of all those responding;... Georgia and Washington, 5% each. "
homosexual - couples heading households Wyoming 1,742 - - - 1990 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 362. "The U.S. government completed its first-ever attempt to enumerate the number of gay and lesbian couples in the nation as part of its 1990 census. Data suggests that there are 145,130 such couples heading housholds in this country. California had 25% of all those responding... States with the smallest percentages were Wyoming (0.6%), South Dakota (0.6%), and Idaho (1.7%). "
homosexual - lesbian Massachusetts: Northampton 3,000 10.00% - - 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 338. "Often absent from these gay neighborhoods, however, are large numbers of lesbians... Of courrse, there are exceptions, even to boystowns. Take Northampton, Massachusetts. Dubbed 'Lesbianville, U.S.A.' by Newsweek magazine, Northampton falls under many lesbian's definitino of an oasis because of its active and visible lesbian population, which is estimated at 3,000 in a town of 30,000. And that number has increased after the run on the town caused by a huge media stir in 1992, when Northampton was the subject of a segment on ABC's newsmagazine 20/20... Many others heard about Northampton and dropped everything to live in a town where lesbians are accepted. The twon newspaper prints announcements of lesbian commitment ceremonies alongside those of heterosexual marriages. It is not uncommon to see women holding hands as they walk down Main Street. "
Hong Kong Council of the Church of Christ in China Hong Kong 26,092 0.44% 48
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Hong Kong Council of the Church of Christ in China (HKCCCC) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Hong Kong Council of the Church of Christ in China (HKCCCC)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 5.9 million... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 26,092/48. "
Hong Kong Council of the Church of Christ in China world 26,092 - 48
units
1
country
1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Hong Kong Council of the Church of Christ in China (HKCCCC) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Hong Kong Council of the Church of Christ in China (HKCCCC)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 5.9 million... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 26,092/48. "
Hong Kong Dejiao Association Hong Kong - - 30
units
- 1950 *LINK* Yoshihara, Kazuo. "Dejiao: A Chinese Religion in Southeast Asia " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "[1947] a group of Dejiao members crossed to Hong Kong... and founded the first branch [there], the Zi Yuan Ge... Many other branches followed. Later these branches united to form the Hong Kong Dejiao Association. The present structure and activity of this Association, the umbrella organization for all the Dejiao organizations, cannot be confirmed after 1950. There used to be around 20 to 30 organizations belonging to this Association "
Hong Kong Dejiao Association Hong Kong - - 15
units
- 1966 *LINK* Yoshihara, Kazuo. "Dejiao: A Chinese Religion in Southeast Asia " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "The Hong Kong Dejiao Association has not been registered under the Hong Kong Company Ordinances. Most of the leaders of this Association are associated with the Zi Jing Ge, and it appears that the Association ceased all activity after 1969. Records from 1965 and 1966 show that there were fifteen organizations affiliated with the Hong Kong Dejiao Association at that time. Among these were organizations such as the Ci Yun Ge and Ci Xin Ge which have no relations with the Zi Jing Ge "
Honganji Japan - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 163. "Jodo-shin-shu: Jap., lit. 'True School of the Pure Land' [distinct from Jodo-shu ('School of the Pure Land')]. The short form is Shin-shu (Shin school). A school of Japanese buddhism that was founded by Shinran (1173-1262) but first organized as a school by Rennyo (1414-99)... The Jodo-shin-shu has no monastic aspect; it is purely a lay community... Today the Jodo-shin-shu is the most important school of Buddhism in Japan and consists of 2 factions: Otani & Honganji. The main temples... are in Kyoto. This division took place in the 17th century... Both factions maintain large universities. "
Honganji Japan - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996). Chapter: Buddhism; pg. 125. "Jodo Shin is the leading school of Buddhism in Japan today, with no religious ruls whatever that distinguish its members from ordinary folk. Its two main subschools are Otani and Honganji. "
Honmichi Japan 480,072 0.42% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Shinto new religion (year of origin: 1913).
Honmichi Japan 900,000 - - - 1996 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 55. "Honmichi: 'Original Way'. A group related to but smaller than Tenrikyo, it also claims descent from Nakayama,Miki and split from Tenrikyo in 1925. Its leader Onishi, Aijiro received a separate revalation from the kami on the basis of which he openly criticised the emperor system and predicted a devastating war if Japan did not turn to his teachings. Honmichi was disbanded and Onishi imprisoned. The movement regrouped after the war. Its membership is currently put at about 900,000. "
Honmon Butsuryushu Japan 465,158 0.40% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Buddhist new religion (year of origin: 1857).
Honniasont North America - Eastern Woodlands 4,000 - - - 1638 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Honniasont world 4,000 - - - 1638 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Hopi Colorado - - - - 1998 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998); pg. 21. "Hopis... Hopis are among the Pueblo Indians of the American West. They hold ceremonies in underground chambers called 'kivas.'... Illustration: A Hopi pueblo in Mesa Verde, Colorado... "
Hopi North America 2,800 - - - 1680 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 54. "Hopi... Their number was estimated at 2,800 in 1680. Tribal registers list over 9,000 today. "
Hopi North America 9,000 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 54. "Hopi... Their number was estimated at 2,800 in 1680. Tribal registers list over 9,000 today. "
Hopi North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 2,800 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Hopi USA 10,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 236, 238. "Hopi: Location: United States (Arizona); Population: 10,000; Religion: Traditional Hopi "; "All Hopi are initiated into katsina societies at about age 9 - 11. As adults, Hopi may be initiated into priesthood societies (called wuutsim) priestess societies, or Snake societies... During the 1880s, the US government divided up the Native North American reservations between religious groups. The Hopi were assigned to the Mennonites (and Baptists). The Reverent H. R. Voth arrived in 1893 and tried to destroy the Hopi Way and replace it with Mennonite Christianity. The Hopi despised him; modern Hopi still remember Voth and what he attempted to do. "
Hopi USA - Southwest - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 17). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2300. "Once there were hundreds of villages, now there are only 25 (in north-west New Mexico and north-east Arizona). The villages cluster together in accordance with tribal links--for there are five separate tribes of Pueblo Indians: Hopi, Zuni, Keres, Tiwa and Tewa. "
Hopi world 2,800 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Hopi world 6,000 - - - 1993 Carmody, Denise Lardner & John Tully Carmody, Native American Religion: An Introduction, Paulist Press: New York, NY (1993); pg. 256. "Recently numbering about 6,000 "; NOTE: adherent figure is really an estimate of tribe pop., regardless of which religion individuals practice. In earlier periods, all tribe practiced tribal religion, but not necessarily true today.
Hospitalers Israel: Jerusalem - - - - 1070 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 328. "Hospitalers (Christian). The Knights Hospitalers of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, known after 1310 as the Knights of Rhodes and after 1530 as the Knights of Malta. Originally founded at Jerusalem (ca. 1070) to care for those on pilgramages or crusades, the order became militarized and, with the Knights Templars, furnished the Kingdom of Jerusalem with a permanent armed force. "
Hosso Buddhism China - - - - 845 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 248. "Fa-hsiang. Classical school of Chinese Buddhism founded by Hsuan-tsang on the teachings of Indian Yogacara Idealism; also known as Wei-shih tsung ('Consciousness-Only school')... The Fa-hsiang school school flourished during the middle of the T'ang Dynasty, but faded in the persecution of 845. Too abstract to compete with Ch'an (Zen) and Pure Land Buddhism, it nevertheless contributed to Ch'an's emphasis on 'mind.' "
Hosso Buddhism Japan - - - - 700 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 134. "Hosso school: Jap. (Chin. - Fa-hsiang school), lit. 'school of the characteristics of dharma'; school of Japanese Buddhism, continuation of the Chinese Fa-hsiang school (which in turn was based on the Yogachara school of India). The Hosso school was brought to Japan by the Japanese monk Dosho (629-700). He went to China in 653 and was there a student of Hsuan-tsang for ten years... Back in Japan Dosho propagated the Hosso teaching at the Guan-go-ji monastery... The lineage founded by him was called the transmission of the teaching of the Southern Monastery... The Hosso school never flourished in Japan to the extent that its counterparts had in India & China. "
Hosso Buddhism Japan - - - - 784 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 524. "The six Nara Buddhist schools. Six scholarly disciplines were pursuied by a small number of monks at designated home temples in Nara. They were extensions of Chinese scholarship... Kusha... Jojitsu... Sanron... Hosso (Chin.: Fa-hsiang, Dharma-characteristics) school. Representing the Buddhist idealism of Yogacara specifically, the Vijnaptimatrata (Representation Only) philosophy of Dharmapala and committed to seeing all realities as mere ideations of the mind... Kegon... Ritsu... "
Hosso Buddhism Japan 19,000 - 42
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 99-100. Idealistic School: One of two wings of Mahayana Buddhism in India, the Yogacara (Self-concentration) School founded by Asanga (c. 410-500 A.D.?)... Eventually absorbed by Fa-hsiang (Jap.: Hosso)... In Japan are 42 Hosso temples and 19,000 adherents.
Hosso Buddhism Japan - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996). Chapter: Buddhism; pg. 122. "By the Nara period (710-94), six schools had been brought over from China: Sanron and Jojitsu (both established in 624), Hosso (654), Kusha (658), Kegon (736), and Ritsu (754); Jojitsu, Kusha, and Ritsu were Hinayana, the other three Mahayana. Of the six, only Hosso, Kegon, and Ritsu have survived in modern Japan, and these have only historical significance and slight membership. "
Hotokusha Japan - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 328. "Hotoku movement. (Jap.; lit. 'repayment of blessings' movement). A religious and ethical movement founded by the 'peasant sage' Ninomiya Sontoku (1787-1856) for the benefit of the peasantry. An eclectic teaching--a 'pill,' as Ninomiya described it, composed two parts of Shinto and one part each of Confucianism and Buddhism--it was perhaps more importantly a practical application of ethical principles to the solution of rural economic problems... Ninomiya developed and implemented plans for the restoration of neglected farm land and villages and for the improvement of agricultural production... One of Ninomiya's disciples, Fukuzumi Masae, organized the Hotokusha (lit. 'society for repayment of blessings'), which still functions throughout Japan in spreading the teaching and work of the master. "
Hottentot Africa - South 100,000 - - - 1600 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 29. "The Hottentot at one time occupied a territory covering more than 100,000 square miles of southwest Africa and roamed the plains with their flocsk of sheep and horned cattle. They were discovered by the Dutch, who were the first to explore South Africa from the Cape of Good Hope. Those early explorers' records tell us of seven tribes with an estimated population of 100,000. "
Hottentot world 35,000 - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 29. "Today the Hottentot population is about 35,000. None of the Hottentot tribes have wholly avoided interbreeding with other racial groups. Furthermore, they have practically lost their cultural identity through the merger of their customs and beliefs with those of their neighbors, both white and black. "
Houma North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 1,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Houma USA 7,810 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Houma world 1,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Hour of Power world 1,500,000 - - 50
countries
1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 371. "Televangelists... But the most successful electronic evangelist in America, at least from a ratings point of view, is Robert Schuller, whose 'Hour of Power' is ranked first among religious broadcasts by both Nielsen and Arbitron, with about 1 1/2 million viewers and listeners in 50 nations. Schuller preaches a sunny gospel from his Crystal Cathedral in Southern California, borrowing from Norman Vincent Peale's 'Power of Positive Thinking' approach to religion... many observers question whether what Schuller is preaching has any relationship to Christ at all. "
House Church Movement Korea, South: Seoul - - 230
units
- 1981 Fichter, Joseph. The Holy Family of Father Moon. Kansas City, MO: Leaven Press (1985); pg. 120-121. Home Churches: members feel obligation to "be concerned for the 360 families [of non-Unificationists] in his immediate neighborhood. "; "They reported also that in the fall of 1981 there were 230 home churches in the city of Seoul alone, and that similar home churches had been set up all over the Republic of Korea... Our assumption has to be that the 230 home churches in the city are promoted by individuals (or married couples) who regularly attend services at the [30 Unification] centeres. "
House Church Movement United Kingdom: Britain 30,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; "20-30,000 "
House of God, the Holy Church of the Living God, The Pillar and Ground of the Truth, House of Prayer for All People world 200 - 4
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 347. "A negro religious sect founded by R. A. R. Johnson in Washington, D. C., in 1913. It is based on 24 principles which Bishop Johnson claims were revealed to him by God... Headquarters are at Beaufort, S.C. There are 4 churches & 200 members. "
House of God, Which Is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth (Cain/Harris) world - - - - 1925 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Black Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 275. "House of God, Which Is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth... Not to be confused with the church of the same name which derives from the movement begun by Mary L. Tate known as the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of Truth, the church presently under discussion derives from the work of William Christian. In the early 20th century, the Church of the Living God (Christian Workers for Fellowship), which Christian founded, was splintered on several occasions. In 1902, a group calling itself the Church of the Living God, Apostolic Church, withdrew and 6 years later under the leadership of Rev. C. W. Harris, became the Church of the Living God, Genreal Assembly. It united in 1924 with a 2nd small splinter body. In 1925, a number of churches withdrew rom the Church of the Living God (Christian Workers for Fellowship) under the leadership of Rev. E. J. Cain and called themselves the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of Truth. "
House of God, Which Is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth (Cain/Harris) world - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Black Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 275. "House of God, Which Is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth; Current address not obtained for this edition... The Harris group joined the Cain group in 1926 and they later adopted the present name. The Church is one in doctrine with the Church of the Living God (Christian Workers for Fellowship). Polity is epicopal and there is an annual general assembly. Membership: Not reported. Remarks: The last independent source on this body is the 1926 Census of Religious bodies. Later sources often confuse it with the Philadelphia-based group of the same name. Its present location and strength is unknown. "
House of God, Which Is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth Without Controversy (Keith Dominion) world - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Black Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 275. "House of God, Which Is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth Without Controversy (Keith Dominion)
% Bishop J. W. Jenkins, Chief Overseer
Box 9113
Montgomery, AL 36108

In 1931, following the death of founder Bishop Mary L. Tate, the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth, Inc., appointed three chief overseers. Eventualy, each became the head of a distinct segment of the church and then of an independent body called a dominion. One of the three chief overseers was M. F. L. Keith, widow of Bishop Tate's son, W. C. Lewis. Her dominion became known as the House of God Which is the Church of the Living God the Pillar and Ground of Truth Without Controversy (Keith Dominion).

The Church is headed by a Chief Overseer (Bishop J. W. Jenkins succeeded Bishop Keith in that post) and a Supreme Executive Council.

Membership: Not reported. "

House of God, Which Is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth, Inc. world 25,860 - 103
units
- 1970 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Black Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 275. "House of God, Which Is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth, Inc.
6107 Cobbs Creek Pkwy.
Philadelphia, PA 19143

In 1919 the Church of the Living God, the Pillar of Truth and Ground of Truth founded by Mary L. Tate, experienced a schism led by the congregation in Philadelphia. The new group, the House of God, the Church of the Living God, the Pillar, the Pillar and Ground of Truth continues the doctrine and episcopal olity of the parent body, but is administratively separate. The general assembly meets annually.

Membership: Not reported. In the early 1970 [sic] the Church reported 103 churches and 25,860 members. Periodicals: The Spirit of Truth Magazine "

House of God, Which Is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth, Inc. world 2,350 - 107
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 95. "Two churches of common origin, similar in type but differing in detail, bear the title Church of the Living God. Both came out of an organization formed in 1889 at Wrightsville, Arkansas, by William Christian... The second body--The House of God, Which Is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth, Inc.--... It has 2,350 members in 107 churches. "
House of God, Which Is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth, Inc. world 2,350 - 107
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Full name: "The House of God, Which is the Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Truth, Inc. "; This is NOT the same as "Church of the Living God (Motto: Christian Workers for Fellowship) "
House of Netjer Illinois - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web page (1998) "The House of Netjer, located physically in the United States of America, in the Chicago, Illinois area, is currently the ONLY temple of Kemetic Orthodoxy in existence; no priests or subsidiary temples have branched off from the main temple as yet. "
House of Netjer world - - 1
unit
1
country
1998 *LINK* official organization web page (1998) "The House of Netjer, located physically in the United States of America, in the Chicago, Illinois area, is currently the ONLY temple of Kemetic Orthodoxy in existence; no priests or subsidiary temples have branched off from the main temple as yet. "
House of the Lord world 300 - 4
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 347. "House of the Lord: A religious sect founded by W. H. Johnson in Detroit, Michigan, in 1925. It now has four churches and 300 members. "
House of the Lord world - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Black Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 275-276. "House of the Lord. Current address not obtained for this edition.... was founded in 1925 by Bishop W. H. Johnson, who established headquarters in Detroit... sanctification is evidenced by conformity to a very rigid code which includes refraining from worldly amusements, whiskey, policy rackets (the 'numbers game'), becoming bell hops, participating in war, swearing, secret organizations, tithin, and life insurance (except as required by an employer). A believer is not sanctifiied if he owns houses, lands, or goods. Water is used in the Lord's Supper... Membership: Not reported. "
House of Yahweh (Abilene, Texas) world - - 7
units
- 1987 *LINK* web site: "Religious Tolerance " (1998) "House of Yahweh, Abilene: Jacob's brother Yisrayl was originally part of the Odessa group. But he left to form a second House of Yahweh in Abilene TX... In 1987, they reported 7 congregations served by 35 ministers. They have about 100 followers living at their headquarters. "
House of Yahweh (Odessa, Texas) world - - - 8
countries
1980 *LINK* web site: "Religious Tolerance " (1998) "House of Yahweh [Odessa] was organized by Jacob Hawkins... group's leadership is from 12 disciples & 70 elders... They don't keep membership records, but reported (in 1980) congregations in US, Israel, India, South Africa, West Africa, Burma, Australian & Belgium. "
Hsuan-Yuan Chiao Taiwan - - - - 1996 *LINK* web page: "Religions in Taiwan " (Written by Miss C.Y.Li, 1996, TSA); (viewed 4 July 1999). "In Taiwan, people are free to have any religious preference. At present, there are 12 religions recognized by the government in Taiwan including the Buddhism, Taoism, Catholicism, Protestantism, Hsuan-Yuan Chiao, Idam, Li-ism, Tenrikyo, Baha'i Faith, T'ien Dih Chiao, T 'ien Te Chiao, and I-Kuan-Tao. "
Hua-yen China - - - - 712 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 145. "Hua-yen school: Chin. (Jap. - Kegon school)... lit. 'Flower Garland school'; important school of Chinese Buddhism... It was founded by Fa-tsang (643-712), but its earliest beginnings go back to the monks Tu-shun (557-640) and Chih-yen (602-68)... 5th patriarch... was Tsung-mi (780-841), who is considered the outstanding master of the school. The Hua-yen school was brought to Japan in the year 740 by Shen-hsiang (Jap., Shinsho). There it was propagated under the name Kegon. "
Hua-yen Japan - - - - 740 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 145. "Hua-yen school: Chin. (Jap. - Kegon school)... lit. 'Flower Garland school'; important school of Chinese Buddhism... It was founded by Fa-tsang (643-712), but its earliest beginnings go back to the monks Tu-shun (557-640) and Chih-yen (602-68)... 5th patriarch... was Tsung-mi (780-841), who is considered the outstanding master of the school. The Hua-yen school was brought to Japan in the year 740 by Shen-hsiang (Jap., Shinsho). There it was propagated under the name Kegon. "
Hua-yen Japan 23,000 - 35
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 99. "Hua-yen School (Skr. Avatansaka, Chin. Hua-yen, Jap. Kegon, all meaning 'Wreath' or 'Flowery Splendor')... The Hua-yen doctrine was brought to Japan by Shinsho in 737. The School has now 35 temples and 23,000 adherents in Japan... "
Hua-yen Japan - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 178. "Kegon school: Japanese, lit. 'School of the Flower Garland'; school of Japanese Buddhism corresponding to the Chinese Hua-yen school. It was brought to Japan from China around 740 by Shen-hsiang (Jap., Shinsho). The first Japanse representative of the Kegon school was Roben (689-722). Emperor Shomu (724-48) wanted to rule Japan according to the principles of Kegon. He had the Toda-ji (Great Eastern Monastery) built in Nara, in which there is a colossal image of the buddha Vairochana. This monastery is still today the center of the Kegon school. "
Hua-yen Japan - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996). Chapter: Buddhism; pg. 122. "By the Nara period (710-94), six schools had been brought over from China: Sanron and Jojitsu (both established in 624), Hosso (654), Kusha (658), Kegon (736) [in Chinese: Hua-yen], and Ritsu (754); Jojitsu, Kusha, and Ritsu were Hinayana, the other three Mahayana. Of the six, only Hosso, Kegon, and Ritsu have survived in modern Japan, and these have only historical significance and slight membership. "
Huchnom North America - Pacific Coast 500 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Huchnom world 500 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)


Huchnom, continued

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