Adherents.com Home Page

Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Hinduism, world

Hinduism, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Hinduism world 648,000,000 13.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998) [Original sources: J.W. Wright, Editor, The Universal Almanac, 1996, Andrews & McMeel, Kansas City. Greg H. Parsons, Executive Director, "U.S. Center for World Mission, " Pasadena, CA; quoted in Zondervan News Service, 1997-FEB-21.] Table: "Number of Adherents of World Religions "
Hinduism world - - - 88
countries
1999 *LINK* web page "Baha'is of Flemington, New Jersey, U.S.A. " Table under heading "...and where are the Baha'is? " [Shows number of countries major religions are in.]
Hinduism world 860,000,000 14.30% - - 2000 Marty, Martin E. & R. Scott Appleby. The Glory and the Power: The Fundamentalist Challenge to the Modern World; Boston: Beacon Press (1992); pg. 13. "recently the 'World Christian Encyclopedia' projected religious numbers for the year 2000, and according to these estimates... There may be 860 million Hindus, 360 million buddhists... "
Hinduism world 859,000,000 - - - 2000 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992). [Orig. source: Tom Sine, "Wild Hope " (Dallas: Word, 1991), pg. 174.]; pg. 189. "Hindus comprise 690 million of the world's population and their growth rate is about 2% a year. According to Tom Sine, their ranks will reach 859 million by the dawn of the millenium. " [projection made in 1991]
Hinduism world 900,000,000 14.11% - - 2005 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "Finally, nonbelievers in God [atheists, agnostics] as a group come in fourth place after Christianity (2 billion), Islam (1.2 billion), and Hinduism (900 million) in terms of global ranking of commonly-held belief systems. "
Hinduism world - except India 15,000,000 - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 11. "...Hinduism, the faith of more than 300 million human beings in India, and of about 15 million more in neighboring Pakistan, Ceylon and Burma and in such island outposts as Bali and even Trinidad. "
Hinduism Wyoming - 0.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Hinduism Yukon - - - - 1991 Gall, Timothy L. & Susan Bevan Gall (editors). Junior Worldmark Encyclopedia of the Canadian Provinces. Detroit: U.X.L. (1997), [Source: Canadian Census]; pg. 186. "In 1991, 43.1% of the population--or about 12,000 people--was Protestant... There were less than 100 people each of the following: Eastern Orthodox, Jews, Moslems, Buddhists, Sikhs, and Hindus. "
Hinduism Yukon - 0.00% - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "Statistics Canada "; web page: "Population, by religion, 1991 Census " (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); Source: Statistics Canada, Catalogue no. 93-319-XPB. table: "Population, by religion, 1991 Census "
Hinduism Zambia 20,000 - - - 1993 *LINK* "Publisher's Desk: Hinduism Today in Africa " in Hinduism Today International (Oct. 1993, Vol. 15, No. 10) on the continent there are major Hindu populations in South Africa (1.2 million), Tanzania (60,000), Kenya (60,000), Nigeria (30,000) and Zambia (20,000) with significant communities in Zimbabwe, Somalia and Botswana.
Hinduism Zambia - - - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 9,349,975. Christian 50%-75%, Muslim and Hindu 24%-49%, indigenous beliefs 1%.
Hinduism - Afghan Germany 5,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Afghanische Hindus " in table. Source: REMID. Listed in "Hinduism " section.
Hinduism - Indian Germany 20,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Indische Hindus " in table. Source: REMID. Listed in "Hinduism " section.
Hinduism - neo- & reform world 15,610,940 0.27% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. "Hindus. 70% Vaishnavites, 25% Shaivites, 2% new-Hindus and reform Hindus. " Hinduism world total: 780,547,000. Total world population: 5,716,425,000.
Hinduism - neo- & reform world 15,861,500 0.27% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. "Hindus. 70% Vaishnavites, 25% Shaivites, 2% new-Hindus and reform Hindus. " Hinduism world total: 793,075,000. Total world population: 5,716,425,000.
Hinduism - Tamil Germany 45,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Tamilische Hindus " in table. Source: REMID. Listed in "Hinduism " section.
Hinduism - traditional USA - - 80
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). pg. 153. "With increasing immigration [of Hindus], temples and supporting associations that have attracted hindus have been established in approximately 80 communities in 23 states. "
hippies USA - college - 2.00% - - 1969 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 194. "By the late 1960s the majority of Americans were clearly upset by the direction the country was going. Most Americans were moderately conservative. Michael Novak has reminded us that 'the number of students who ever demonstrated or marched or could by any public act have been taken to be 'radical' or 'hippie' never exceeded 2 percent. Polling data show that young people were more conservative than their elders.'

Draft-dodgers, antiwar demonstrations, changing moral values, urban riots, Muslim militants, campus uprisings, hippies, pot, acid rock, militant women, assassinations, radical clergy, rising taxes and inflation--to many average, white, hard-working, middle- and lower-class citizens, it seemed that the nation was coming apart. "

Hispanic Mennonite Conference of Churches in the United States Canada - - 6
units
- 1999 Dolgado, Berta. "Hushed Blessings " in Dallas Morning News, 18 Sept. 1999; pg. 3G. "Samuel Lopez, president of the Hispanic Mennonite Conference of Churches in the United States and Canada... There are 96... congregations in the U.S... he said. An additional six are in Canada. "
Hispanic Mennonite Conference of Churches in the United States USA - - 96
units
- 1999 Dolgado, Berta. "Hushed Blessings " in Dallas Morning News, 18 Sept. 1999; pg. 3G. "Samuel Lopez, president of the Hispanic Mennonite Conference of Churches in the United States and Canada... There are 96 Hispanic congregations in the U.S., mostly in the Northeast, he said. "
Hispanic Mennonite Conference of Churches in the United States world - - 102
units
2
countries
1999 Dolgado, Berta. "Hushed Blessings " in Dallas Morning News, 18 Sept. 1999; pg. 3G. "Samuel Lopez... of the Hispanic Mennonite Conference of Churches in the United States and Canada... There are 96 Hispanic congregations in the U.S.... he said. An additional six are in Canada. "
Hito no Michi Japan - - - - 1931 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 572. "The second precursor movement [of PL Kyodan] was founded by a disciple of Kanada, an Obaku Zen priest, Miki Chojiro (1871-1938), who with his teenage son, Akisada (b. 1900), came to Kanada in 1916... After Kanada's death in 1919 [his] movement faded, but in 1924 Miki Tokuharu [Chojiro]... organized a movement called Jindo-Tokumitsu-kyo (the human way as taught by Tokumitsu). In 1931 the name was changed to Hito no Michi (lit. 'the way of man'). This movement flourished during the early 1930s, but by 1936 it had become the object of persecution by the government... In 1937 the government ordered the dissolution of the movement... 1945... Miki Tokuchika [Akisada]... began to reconsruct the movement with a remnant of its former members [into] PL Kyodan... "
Hittite Turkey - - - - -2000 B.C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "HITTITES: an ancient Indo-European people who settled in Asia Minor prior to 2000 B.C. and came to play an important role in the HEBREW BIBLE. "
Hittite Turkey - - - - -1200 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1323. "German excavations since 1907 within the walls of an ancient city on a hillside near the Turkish village of Boghaz Koi in Asia Minor (Anatolia) have revealed the existence of a kingdom which had that city as its capital and which lasted from about 1700 to about 1200 BC. It was called 'the Land of Hatti', its capital was Hattusas, and its people are known as the Hittities, by reason of the undoubted, though remote, connection of the name Hatti with the Hittites, or sons of Heth, mentioned in the Bible. During those five centuries the rullers of Hattusas extended their dominion over populations speaking languages different from their own... Our present knowledge of Hittite and Hurrian religion and mythology is due entirely to the German excavations at Boghaz Koi... "
Hittite Turkey - - - - -1200 B.C.E. Sheehan, Sean. Turkey (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1993); pg. 21. "The Hittite empire, from 1700 to 1200 B.C., was one of the first and most significant settlements in Turkey. The Hittites' center of power was based in central Anatolia at Hattusas, near modern Ankara. The empire came to an end when it succumbed to various tribes from the west in 1200 B.C. "
Hlubi South Africa - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Hmong California: Fresno 30,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 261-262. "There are about 150,000 Hmong in the United States. There are 30,000 Hmong living in Fresno... "
Hmong China 5,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 261-262. "An estimated 3-5 million [Hmong] continue to live in southern China, mostly in Yunnan. "
Hmong Laos 100,000 2.63% - - 1988 Diamond, Judith. Laos (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1989); pg. 85. "It is believed that now there are only 100,000 Hmong left in Laos. "
Hmong Laos 100,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 261-262. "There are about 350,000 in north Vietnam, 230,000 in north and central Laos, and around 100,000 in northern Thailand... "
Hmong Laos 230,000 5.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 261-262. "There are about 350,000 in north Vietnam, 230,000 in north and central Laos, and around 100,000 in northern Thailand... The Hmong make up two-thirds of the upland Lao population and about 5% of the total population of Laos, the only country where they are a significant minority. "
Hmong USA 100,000 - - - 1990 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 231. "...by 1990 the Hmong population in the US had reached almost 100,000. Most had arrived during the early 1980s. Hmong Americans are generally very young; about one-third of the 1990 population were born in America... Most Hmong Americans continue to follow their traditional religious ways. Traditional Hmong religion is pantheistic, recognizing the presence of divine spirit in all things. Spirit cults, shamanism, and ancestor worship are the three major components of traditional Hmong religious life... A number of Hmong converted to Christianity in Laos, and even more have convertd since their arrive in the US... "
Hmong USA 150,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 261-262. "There are about 150,000 Hmong in the United States. There are 30,000 Hmong living in Fresno, California, and significant Hmong communities in other parts of California and in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Rhode Island. "
Hmong Vietnam 350,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 261-262. "There are about 350,000 in north Vietnam, 230,000 in north and central Laos, and around 100,000 in northern Thailand... "
Hmong world 6,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 261, 263. "Hmong: Location: Southern China; Viet Nam; Laos; Thailand; Population: About 4 to 6 million; Religion: Animism; some fundamentalist Protestant Christianity "; Pg. 263: "In Thailand and Laos, 10-20% of the hmong have responded to missionaries and adopted fundamentalist Protestant Christianity. This is seen by other Hmong as a threat to clan solidarity, since Christians destroy their spirit altars, refuse to sacrifice at funerals, and feel less bound by clan ties. "
Hmong Meo Vietnam 200,000 0.28% - - 1994 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Vietnam ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1994); pg. 37, 39. Pg. 37: "...Vietnam's 71.8 million people... "; Pg. 39: "In the mountains of northern Vietnam, the largest ethnic groups are the Tai (2,000,000), the Muong (550,0000), the Hmong Meo (200,000), and the Zao (200,000)... People from the Hmong Meo and Zao groups speak Sino-Tibetan dialects that are rooted in China. "
Ho India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Tribes speaking Munda languages and extending over parts of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, and Orissa include the Santal, Ho, Gadaba, Bondo, and Saora. "
Hoa Hao USA - Vietnamese - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 443. "...about 29-40% of Vietnamese Americans are Catholic... Most Vietnamese Americans, however, are Buddhist of... Mahayana Buddhism. In 1991 there were 80 Vietnamese Buddhist temples in the US. Other religions are also represented among Vietnamese Americans, including Confucianism..., Taoism, Cao-Dai..., and Hoa-Hao (a meditative sect originating in the Mekong Delta in 1939). "
Hoa Hao Vietnam 1,500,000 - - - 1954 Dareff, Hal. The Story of Vietnam: A Background Book for Young People; New York: Parents' Magazine Press (1966); pg. 153. "When Diem became premier [page 145: July 7, 1954], the Hoa Hao were a million and a half strong, with an army of fifteen thousand. "
Hoa Hao Vietnam 2,000,000 2.79% - - 1994 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Vietnam ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1994); pg. 37, 45. Pg. 37: "...Vietnam's 71.8 million people... "; Pg. 45: "Two religious sects developed in southern Vietnam in the early 20th century. A faith healer founded Hoa Hao, a reformed Buddhist group that now claims about 2 million members. This sect emphasizes simplicity of worship and a direct relationship between the individual and the supreme being. "
Hoa Hao Vietnam 1,610,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Hoa Hao world 1,000,000 - - - 1954 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 15. "...in Vietnam today there are two religions that started in the 20th century largely as a protest against French colonialism... The other religion, Noa Noa, was founded in 1939 by a peasant of the Mekong Delta area south of Saigon. A reformed Buddhism with great appeal to the peasant classes, the movement had at one time a million members, and it founded a political party, the Social Democrats. Now it has lots its strength through schisms and dissensions. "
Hoh North America - Pacific Coast 500 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Quileute
Hoh world 500 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Quileute
Holiness - non-Pentecostal world 1,500,000 - - - 1997 Conkin, Paul K. American Originals: Homemade Varieties of Christianity, The University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill, NC (1997); pg. 276. "Denominations that are holiness but not Pentecostal account for another 1.5 million. "
Holiness Baptist Association USA 2,000 - 46
units
- 1975 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Holiness Pentecostals; pg. 238-239. "In the mid-1970s there were 46 congregations (all in Georgia and Florida) and approx. 2,000 members. "
Holiness Church USA 400 - 15
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 341. Table: "...the leading holiness groups in the United States at the present time are as follows: " [Table lists figures for "Churches " and "Members " for 28 groups.]
Holiness Church world 400 - 15
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 340. "Holiness Church: A 'second blessing' holiness sect organized by three Methodist preachers in California in 1896... There are 15 churches having 400 members. "
Holiness Church of God USA 927 - 28
units
1
country
1968 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Holiness Pentecostals; pg. 239. "Churches are found in New York, Virginia and West Virginia... In 1968 there were 28 congregations and 927 members. "
Holiness Church of God world 927 - 28
units
- 1968 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 20th Century Holiness; pg. 219. "Holiness Church of God, Inc... Graham, NC [H.Q.]... is a small body established in 1920 at Madison, North Carolina, and incorporated 8 years later at Winston-Salem. It holds an annual general assembly. There is a president, bishop, vice president and general secretary. Overseers are appointed for five areas in the South and East. Membership: Not reported. At last report (1968) the Church had 28 churches, 36 ministers, and 927 members. "
Holiness Churches, National Association of world - - 17
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Glenn Griffith Movement; pg. 227. "National Association of Holiness Churches... Griffith, IN [H.Q.]... was formed in 1967. H. Robb French (1891-1985), a former pastor in the Wesleyan Methodist Church and one of the founders of the Interdenominational Holiness Convention, was the chief moving force in its founding and early development... The association exists as a loose confederation of independent ministries and churches formed for the purposes of promoting holiness and providing fellowship... Missionary work is supported in Mexico, Brazil, and India. Membership: In 1988 there were 17 congregations in the association and 86 affiliated ministers. Many of the ministers and churches affiliated with the association are also affiliated with other conservative holiness church bodies. "
Holiness Gospel Church world 180 - 3
units
- 1978 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 20th Century Holiness; pg. 219. "Holiness Gospel Church... Etters, PA [H.Q.]... was founded in 1945 by former members of the Evangelical United Brethren and the Church of God. Its theology is Wesleyan holiness... Membership: Not reported. In the late 1970s there were 3 congregations and 180 members. "
Holiness Methodist Church USA 200 - 3
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 341. Table: "...the leading holiness groups in the United States at the present time are as follows: " [Table lists figures for "Churches " and "Members " for 28 groups.]
Holiness movement United Kingdom: England - - - - 1857 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1328. "In England, many evangelicals in the Church of England and in the Noncomformist denominations were attracted to Holiness ideas, from the time of the second evangelical awakening in 1857, and as a result of campaigns brought to Great Britain by Dwight L. Moody in 1873 and 1883, but most of them continued in their existing fellowships. The most important of all the British developments that were influenced by the Holiness movement was the Salvation Army. Its founder, William Booth, had been a Methodist New Connection preacher who struck out on his own. He accepted Holiness ideas and rejoiced when 'the fire fell' at his meetings. Salvationism, however, is a many-sided movement and its development cannot be wholly accounted to Holiness teachings. "
Holiness movement USA - - - - 1907 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1329. "When separate and independent sects did emerge [from the Holiness movement], some of them took the title 'Pentecostal', and one of the largest amalgamations, finally effected in 1907, took the name Pentecostal Church of the Nazarene. In 1919, in order to distinguish themselves from the 'tongues movement', as they called the later Pentecostalists, these Holiness believers dropped the word 'Pentecostal' from their title. This body became one of the largest Holiness sects, with thousands of adherents all over the united States, and a small following in Britain. "
Holiness movement world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1328. "Although the Holiness movement is a 19th century phenomenon, and continues to be significant in the 20th, its rots go much further back. As the name suggests, Holiness owed much to Pietism, which had emphasis on leading an exemplary moral life in conformity to religious commitment and, if need be, in dissociation from the world. Pietism had developed among some of the Lutherans, of whom the German Count Zinzendorf (1700-1760), patron and leader of the Herrnhut community of Moravian Brethren, was the most important to the development of Holiness ideas. "
Holiness Movement Church world - - 118
units
5
countries
1900 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 215. "Ralph C. Horner had been an evangelist in both the Methodist church in Canada and the Wesleyan Methodist Church... in the late 19th century, but left them to found his own organization, the Holiness Movement Church, in 1895. As its bishop, he ruled with all the authority of both a bishop and a charismatic personality, and within 5 years there were 118 places of worship. Churches were planted across Canada, into New York, with foreign work in Ireland, Egypt, and China. Then in 1918 the aging bishop was asked to retire. Not satisfied with the request of the church, he, with his supporters, left and founded the Standard Church of America... (The Holiness Movement Church eventually merged with the Free Methodist Church, which accounts for that church's large membership in Egypt.) "
Holiness-Pentecostal North Carolina: New Hanover County - - 10
units
- 1998 *LINK* web site (1998): Wilmington Morning Star (N. Carolina newspaper); Special/Thursday, Aug. 20, 1998 "in New Hanover County... This list of active religious groups is based primarily on Southern Bell's Yellow Pages and the Morning Star's weekly list of worship services " [List of churches & # of congregations]; [ "Pentecostal (Holiness), with 10 congreg. is listed separately from "Pentecostal ", with 11 congreg.]
Holiness-Pentecostal - black USA 1,000,000 - - - 1968 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 1060. "In addition to these various large, medium, and small organizations there were literally countless independent congregations. Taken as a whole, the black Holiness-Pentecostal impulse probably included a million adherents. "
Holiness/Holy Alabama - 1.50% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Holiness/Holy Arizona - 0.00% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Holiness/Holy Arkansas - 0.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Holiness/Holy California - 0.10% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Holiness/Holy Colorado - 0.00% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Holiness/Holy Connecticut - 0.30% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.


Holiness/Holy, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.