Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to hate groups, New York

hate groups, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
hate groups North Carolina - - 27
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups North Dakota - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Ohio - - 26
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Oklahoma - - 5
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Oregon - - 5
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Pennsylvania - - 27
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups South Carolina - - 12
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups South Dakota - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Tennessee - - 14
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Texas - - 38
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups USA 25,000 - - - 1994 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 31. "No one really knows exactly how many people belong to hate groups or even how many groups exist. The Southern Poverty Law Center's (SPLC) Klanwatch program, which monitors hate groups, estimates there are twenty-two to twenty-five thousand hate group members in the U.S. and about 350 organizations. "
hate groups USA - - 602
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 77. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups, a number that includes 48 black separatist groups. Much hate group activity takes place in areas of the country with high minority populations. "; Pg. 79: [Key to map] Ku Klux Klan: 110; Neo-Nazi: 180; Racist Skinhead: 39; Christian Identity: 32; Black Separatist: 48; Neo-Confederate; Other: 105 [Source: Southern Poverty Law Center.]
hate groups Utah - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Virginia - - 26
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Washington, D.C. - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Washington, D.C. - - 12
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups West Virginia - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Wisconsin - - 8
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups world - - - - 1994 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 31. "Klanwatch... estimates there are [up to 25,000] hate group members in the U.S... Thousands more people are thought to belong to hate groups outside the U.S., primarily in Europe. "
hate groups Wyoming - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
Hatha Yoga world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "HATHA YOGA: that branch of YOGA which seeks to establish conscious control over the automatic processes of the body. This is the most POPULAR FORM of Yoga in the West where it is taught in terms of physical health and exercise. It is often mistakenly thought, by Westerners, to be the only form of Yoga. "
Hauhau New Zealand - - - - 1862 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1730. Caption: "The Hauhau, a resistance group against the European occupation of Maori land, believed that through faith and war they could regain their heritage: Te Ua, the first Hauhau prophet, with raised open hand... "
Hauhau New Zealand - - - - 1862 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1732. "Rather similar reactions to Christianity also occurred later in the 19th century, during and after the Maori Wars (1856-70), when the profound Maori-European antagonism over land took a particularly bitter form. In 1862 a resistance movement began to develop which was also a new religion, compounded of Christian, Jewish and Maori elements. Called the Hauhau after their rallying cry, they regarded themselves as a chosen people, who through faith, and pitiless war on the settlers, would regain their traditional heritage. "
Hauhau New Zealand 162 0.00% - - 1986 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1986 NZ population: 3,263,228.
Hauhau New Zealand 315 0.01% - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1991 NZ population: 3,373,853.
Hauhau New Zealand 417 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1996 NZ population: 3,616,633.
Hausa Africa 20,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 206-207. "Hausa: Location: Hausaland in West Africa (northwestern Nigeria and in adjoining southern Niger); Population: more than 20 million; Religion: Islam, small native cults "; "Hausa is the most widely spoken language in West Africa... Since the penetration of Islam into Hausaland in the mid-14th century, most Hausa have become extremely devoted to the Islamic faith. " [This statistic, then, is a count of ethnic affiliation, NOT a distinct religious group.]
Hausa Nigeria 23,499,000 21.00% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Nigeria ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 33-34. Pg. 33: "...Nigeria's 111.9 million people... "; "Comprising 21% of Nigeria's population, the Hausa [ethnic group] live in northern Nigeria and form the largest group in the country... Islam is the dominant religion among the Hausa, and there is an obvious Arabic influence in their culture. "
Hausa Nigeria - 20.00% - - 1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 82. "Today, the Hausa are the largest ethnic group in Nigeria, comprising over 20% of the total population. They live in small towns and large cities such as Sokoto and Kano, and farm the surrounding land... "
Hausa world 15,000,000 - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 77, 83. "Hausa: Population: 15,000,000; Location: Nigeria, Niger; Language: Hausa "; Pg. 83: "No matter what they are doing, Hausa men and boys stop and pray together five times a day, as required by the Muslim faith... the traditions of Islam are very strong among the Hausa, governing their outlook on life as well as their daily activities. "
Havasupai North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 300 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Havasupai world 300 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Hawaii Hawaii - - - - 1966 Carpenter, Allan. Hawaii; Chicago: Childrens Press (1966); pg. 48. "1st missionaries were Congregationalists... followed by Catholics, Mormons, Methodists, Anglicans, Lutherans, SDA, Christian Scientists, Baptists & others "... Chinese brought Confucianist, Taoist & Buddhist... Roman Catholic has largest membership of any single religious group.
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii 300,000 100.00% - - 1778 *LINK* Web site: "Native Hawaiian Data Book " [Source: Robert C. Schmitt. Demographic Statistics of Hawaii: 1778-1965. (Honolulu, 1968). Robert C. Schmitt. Historical Statistics of Hawaii. (Honolulu, 1977).] "Table?.1 The Population of the Hawaiian Islands: 1778-1896 " [Total pop. figures for Hawaiian islands. Based on other sources, we assume that prior to 1920 virtually all Hawaiians practiced the traditional religion, synonymous with the culture.]
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii 270,000 100.00% - - 1796 *LINK* Web site: "Native Hawaiian Data Book " [Source: Robert C. Schmitt. Demographic Statistics of Hawaii: 1778-1965. (Honolulu, 1968). Robert C. Schmitt. Historical Statistics of Hawaii. (Honolulu, 1977).] "Table?.1 The Population of the Hawaiian Islands: 1778-1896 " [Total pop. figures for Hawaiian islands. Based on other sources, we assume that prior to 1920 virtually all Hawaiians practiced the traditional religion, synonymous with the culture.]
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii 266,000 100.00% - - 1803 *LINK* Web site: "Native Hawaiian Data Book " [Source: Robert C. Schmitt. Demographic Statistics of Hawaii: 1778-1965. (Honolulu, 1968). Robert C. Schmitt. Historical Statistics of Hawaii. (Honolulu, 1977).] "Table?.1 The Population of the Hawaiian Islands: 1778-1896 " [Total pop. figures for Hawaiian islands. Based on other sources, we assume that prior to 1920 virtually all Hawaiians practiced the traditional religion, synonymous with the culture.]
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii 154,000 100.00% - - 1804 *LINK* Web site: "Native Hawaiian Data Book " [Source: Robert C. Schmitt. Demographic Statistics of Hawaii: 1778-1965. (Honolulu, 1968). Robert C. Schmitt. Historical Statistics of Hawaii. (Honolulu, 1977).] "Table?.1 The Population of the Hawaiian Islands: 1778-1896 " [Total pop. figures for Hawaiian islands. Based on other sources, we assume that prior to 1920 virtually all Hawaiians practiced the traditional religion, synonymous with the culture.]
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii 152,000 100.00% - - 1805 *LINK* Web site: "Native Hawaiian Data Book " [Source: Robert C. Schmitt. Demographic Statistics of Hawaii: 1778-1965. (Honolulu, 1968). Robert C. Schmitt. Historical Statistics of Hawaii. (Honolulu, 1977).] "Table?.1 The Population of the Hawaiian Islands: 1778-1896 " [Total pop. figures for Hawaiian islands. Based on other sources, we assume that prior to 1920 virtually all Hawaiians practiced the traditional religion, synonymous with the culture.]
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii - 100.00% - - 1819 Chegaray, Jacques. Hawaii: Isle of Dreams; New York: Sterling Publishing Co. (1957); pg. 118-119. 1819: Princess Keopuolani defied "old religion " by eating a forbidden nut, & other acts. Led to abandonment of the traditional taboo-based religion. 1 year later, first European missionaries arrived finding "a people organized but without any religion. "
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii - 100.00% - - 1819 Kane, Robert S. Hawaii A to Z; Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1975); pg. 2-4. "The culture was based on a rigid authoritarian society... a system of male dominance... The system was based on a series of kapus [taboos]... " (pg. 4:) "The kapu system... was [the] law of the land. The Hawaiian gods were worshipped... "
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii 144,000 100.00% - - 1819 *LINK* Web site: "Native Hawaiian Data Book " [Source: Robert C. Schmitt. Demographic Statistics of Hawaii: 1778-1965. (Honolulu, 1968). Robert C. Schmitt. Historical Statistics of Hawaii. (Honolulu, 1977).] "Table?.1 The Population of the Hawaiian Islands: 1778-1896 " [Total pop. figures for Hawaiian islands. Based on other sources, we assume that prior to 1920 virtually all Hawaiians practiced the traditional religion, synonymous with the culture.]
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii - - - - 1825 Hammel, Faye & Sylvan Levey. Frommer's Budget Travel Guide: Hawaii '94 on $75 a Day; New York: Prentice Hall Travel (1993); pg. 10-11. "The ancient religion of Hawaii--Huna--remained a mystery to Westerners for many years [until Max Freedom Long's work in 1940s and 50s]... The tabu system was not broken until the widow of Kamehameha I, Kaahamanu, confronted the old gods and smashed their powers in the 1820s. "
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii - - - - 1830 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 225. "The traditional Polynesian religion, which declined in the 19th century with the arrivial of Christian missionaries on the islands, was animistic, based on a belief in numerous gods and spirits... One can still see evidence of pre-Christian religion throughout Hawaii in open-air temples called heiau. "
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii - 0.00% - - 1840 Carpenter, Allan. Hawaii; Chicago: Childrens Press (1966).; pg. 33. [Royal family] "proclaimed that the old religion was dead. " (p. 33); "When the old religion was first abolished, the people had nothing to take its place... 'great awakening' did not come until 1837... For almost 2 yrs. the people studied the new morality, & then great numbers were baptized... Christianity was proclaimed the national religion by Kamehameha III. "
Hawaiian traditional religion Hawaii - 0.00% - - 1840 Chegaray, Jacques. Hawaii: Isle of Dreams; New York: Sterling Publishing Co. (1957); pg. 118-119. 1819: Princess Keopuolani defied "old religion " by eating a forbidden nut, & other acts. Led to abandonment of the traditional taboo-based religion. 1 year later, first European missionaries arrived finding "a people organized but without any religion. "
Haya Tanzania - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Hazara Afghanistan 1,000,000 6.90% - - 1989 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Afghanistan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1989); pg. 40, 43. "About 14.5 million people live in Afghanistan... "; Pg. 43: "Central Afghanistan is the home of the Hazara [an ethnic group], a Dari-speaking community of fewer than one million people. Their mountainous territory in the Hindu Kush is difficult to farm, and many Hazara have moved to Kabul, where they usually hold jobs that require little education. "
Heaven's Gate California 39 - - - 1997 Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. "Religion " in The Future Now: Predicting the 21st Century. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1998); pg. 58. "...Heaven's Gate. In March 1997, thirty-nine sad, ageing, 'zoned-out' computer-freaks in a villa in California poisoned themselves in anticipation of the end. They had every New Age trait except optimism. Wrapped up in a nerdish world of web-surfing, they thought--according to their 'exit videos'--that a UFO would transport them in the trail of a comet before 'heaven's gate' closed. They even posted a 'Red Alert' on the Internet, warning, 'Planet about to be recycled'. The leader's rambling last message emphasized the millennium's end as the cut-off point for intending fugitives. "
Hegelianism Germany - - - - 1831 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "HEGEL, George Wilhelm Friedrich (1770-1831): German philosopher whose system is commonly known as 'HEGELIANISM.' His complex idealist philosophy contains many elements the most influential of which are: (1) the DIALECTIC which is generally interpreted to mean that all reasoning is dialectical proceeding from a CONCEPT to a new and contradictory concept which gives way to a third concept that transcends and synthesizes both earlier concepts... (2) the theory of self-realization by which the dialectical process in the individual leads to a determinate 'SELF' which is 'for itself;' (3) the theory of history which is a dialectical process leading to the manifestation of the ABSOLUTE SPIRIT and arguing that in every specific age the spirit manifests itself in the Zeitgeist or the 'spirit-of-the-age' which determines social and political life, knowledge, religion and art. Hegel's work strongly influenced such people as FEUERBACH and MARX. "
Hehe Tanzania - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Heimhalungswerk Jesu Christi Germany, West 5,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Figure given for total membership is simply "several thousand "
Helios of Emesa Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1928. "During the Hellenistic period... very little is heard about Mysteries. But at the time of the Roman Empire such religions suddenly sprang up. The best-known are the Mysteries of Isis and Mithras. However, there were also groups which worshipped... the Syrian gods Adonis, Jupiter Dolichenus and Helios of Emesa. "
Hellenic Orthodox Church in America New York: Buffalo 1,632 - 1
unit
- 1926 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997). [Orig. source: 1926 U.S. govt. census from Bureau of the Census, 1930, vol. 1]; pg. 8. "Table 31. Number of churches, membership [incl. children]... 1926 "; Reports prepared by pastors/boards of elders. Listed in table as Greek Orthodox Church (Hellenic).
Hellenic Orthodox Church in America USA 9,000 - 5
units
- 1967 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 66. -
Hellenic Orthodox Church in America world 9,000 - 5
units
- 1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 123. "Hellenic Orthodox Church in America... In 1952 Archimandrite Petros, a monk from Mt. Athos, arrived in the U.S. and began to gather groups of independent communities which follow the Julian calendar. In 1962 he was consecrated Bishop of Astoria (Long Island, New York) by two Russian bishops who use the Julian calendar... and the Hellenic Orthodox Church came into existence. It is at one with Orthodoxy except on the calendar issue... By 1967 [Petros] directed five churches and missions and 9,000 members... Membership: Not reported. "
Hellfire Club United Kingdom: England - - - - 1750 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 63. "More glamorous were groups like the Hellfire Club of eighteenth-century England. The Hellfire Club was typical of many groups labeled satanic. It consisted of wealthy, bored young gentlemen who met to dabble in magic, hold orgies, and generally outrage the respectable establishment. They often dressed in monks' robes and performed obscene parodies of Christian rituals. Most then went on to lead perfectly respectable lives as members of the British upper class. Two interesting names have been associated with the Hellfire Club. The first is John Wilkes, a radical politician who was the only supporter of American indepence in the British Parliament at the time of the Revolution... The second is Benjamin Franklin, who reputedly attended meetings of The Hellfire Club while he was in England. "
Hellfire Club United Kingdom: England 12 - - - 1762 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1794. "Medmenham Monks. The notoious society commonly known as the 'Hell-Fire Club' which met at Medmenham Abbey in Buckinghamshire, and perhaps afterwards in the High Wycombe caves, resulted from the meeting of several eccentric minds; but it was also very much a creature of its century... Paul Whitehead... Tomas Potter... George Selwyn... Bubb, Dashwood, Sandwich... Marquis of Bute. From 1750 until 1762 these public figures gathered in Sir Francis Dashwood's ruined abbey for a fortnight each June. With several of the local gentry, they formed a 'Superior Order' of 12... There was also an 'Inferior Order' of 12, composed of guests and neighbours who were not allowed to take part in the special festivities of the brotherhood... The escapade lasted for 12 years until... John Wilkes decided to expose the whole apparatus... by 1762 the majority... were in political power... Bute was Prime Minister... Bubb Dodington was in the Cabinet... Dashwood was Chancellor of the Exchequer. "
Hellfire Club United Kingdom: England - - - - 1762 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1794. "[After 1762] Dashwood tried to resurrect the festivities in the caves under Wycombe Hill, on top of which he built a most secular church, combined with wine bins and surmounted by a golden ball in which he would sit with a bottle of his 'divine milk-punch' and roar parodies of the Psalms. But age wearied the appetite of the company for diversion; death pruned their numbers... "
Helveti-Jerrahi USA - - - - 1978 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 448. "The Jerrahi (or Halveti-Jerrahi) order... is limited mainly to Turkey, with prominent followings in Europe and the U.S., having been brought over from Istanbul in 1978 by Sheikh Muzaffer (1916-86). "
Helveti-Jerrahi world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 448. "The Jerrahi (or Halveti-Jerrahi) order derives from Nur ud-Din Muhammad al-Jarrahi al Halveti of Istanbul (d. 1720) and is limited mainly to Turkey, with prominent followings in Europe and the U.S? "
Helveti-Jerrahi world - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Naqshbandi.net "; web page: "A 30-Second Guide to Sufi Orders Found in North America " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999). [Orig. source: GNOSIS Magazine #30 (Winter 1994)] "Helveti-Jerrahi (founders: Umar al-Khalwati [d.1397], Hazreti Pir Nureddin Jerrahi [d.1733]). A primarily Turkish branch of the widespread Khalwatiyyah (Turkish: Helvetiyye), this syncretic order includes teachings from several major orders. The now-departed Grand Sheikh of the order, Sheikh Muzaffer Ozak, brought the order to New York. Its present leaders in the U.S. include Sheikh Nur al-Jerrahi (Lex Hixon), Sheikh Tosun Bayrak, and Sheikh Ragip Frager. "
Helvetic Confession Austria - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 46-47. "About 6% of Austrians are Protestant, either Baptist, Methodist, or members of uniquely Austrian sects such as the churches of the Augsburgian Confession and the Helvetic Confession. "
henotheism world - - - - -1000 B.C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "HENOTHEISM: from the Greek words henos meaning 'one' and theos or 'God' this term was coined by Max MULLER for a FORM of RELIGION which accepts the WORSHIP of one GOD by a particular individual or GROUP but does not deny the existence of different GODS worshiped by other people. It is sometimes described as 'one-God-at-a-timeism.' Muller suggested that originally the ancient HEBREWS and many other peoples were henotheists. "
henotheism world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2233. "Polytheism. From Greek word for 'many' and 'god', belief in many gods, who preside over different departments of Nature and aspects of life; distinguished from monotheism, belief that there is only one God, and from henotheism, devotion to a single god without asserting that he is the only one. "
Hepzibah Faith Missionary Association USA 700 - 20
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 341. Table: "...the leading holiness groups in the United States at the present time are as follows: " [Table lists figures for "Churches " and "Members " for 28 groups.]


Hepzibah Faith Missionary Association, continued

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