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back to Hasidic Jews, world

Hasidic Jews, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Hasidic Jews world - - - - 1775 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Judaism; pg. 247-248. "The new Hasidic movment was pioneered in 1735 by Israel Ben Eliezer... Rabbi Elijah of Vilna... (1720-97), the undisputed... leader of Lithuanian and Russian Jewry, opposed the movement and had Hasidism banned. Still it continued to spread rapidly all over Poland and Lithuania, across Eastern Europe and around the world, until almost half of all Jewry was Hasidic... toward the end of the 18th century... the Hasidim and Mitnagdim... closed ranks. Hasidism merged with the rabbinic mainstream and stands today as a bastion of Orthodox Judaism, a somewhat closed society similar to the Amish... "
Hasidic Jews world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1220. "The main centres of Hasidism having been in Eastern Europe, they were wiped out by the Nazis in the Second World War. At present the main centres are in Israel and in the United States, where a number of hasidic dynasties ahave re-established themselves. "
Hasidic Jews world - - - - 1977 Bermant, Chaim. The Jews. New York: NY Times Books (1977); pg. 14. "Many Jews (in Britain the overwhelming mass) are still at least nominally Orthodox, and not a few are Ultra-Orthodox and maintain a way of life hardly, if at all, removed from that of the Russian Pale of Settlement in the nineteenth century. "
Hasidic Jews world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 296. "...Eastern European Hasidism... The Hasidic world of Eastern Europe was destroyed during Hitler's genocidal war against the Jews. Out of the remnants of the Holocaust the Hasidic movement is recovering its strength in Eretz Israel and in America. It is staunchly orthodox... "
Hasidic Jews world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "HASIDISM: Hebrew term for "PIETY " or 'the pious.' In the eighteenth century it became associated with an Eastern European JEWISH sect founded by RABBI ISRAEL ben Eliezer. It reacted against what it saw as the arid interpretation of the TALMUD by RABBIS and drew upon the CABBALA to develop a rich MYSTICAL TRADITION. Union with GOD was sought through ECSTATIC PRAYER and the coming of the MESSIAH was earnestly desired. Today Martin BUBER is the best known interpreter of Hasidism even though many scholars question his understanding of the tradition. "
Hasidic Jews world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Judaism; pg. 250. "After the Ba'al Shem's death, the rebbes inevitably began to acquire more power... The position became hereditary, and localized dynasties of rebbes developed... Dozens of these dynastic lines of leadership survive today, e.g., the Satmar, the Bobov, the Telem, and, most visibly, the Lubavitcher, who are active in American Hasidism. "
Hasidic Jews world 325,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "The total number of Traditional-Orthodox Jews worldwide is estimated at over 650,000, out of a total Jewish population of about 13 million. Over half live in Israel, mostly in Jerusalem and B'nai Barak... "
Hasidic Jews world 650,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "The total number of Traditional-Orthodox Jews worldwide is estimated at over 650,000, out of a total Jewish population of about 13 million. "
Hasidic Jews world 650,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "Traditional-Orthodox Jews: Alternate Names: Ultra-Orthodox; Hasidic; fundamentalist; Location: Worldwide, particularly Israel, North America, Europe, and Canada; Population: 650,000; Religion: Orthodox Judaism "; "Their rejection of the secular world distinguishes them from the large body of Orthodox Jews--referred to here as 'Modern-Orthodox'--whose religious beliefs and practices are very similar, but who participate more fully in the cultures of the countries in which they live... "
Hasidic Jews world - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "Hasidic sects take their names from the Eastern European towns in which they originated. Major groups include the Satmar, Lubavitcher, Bobover, Belzer, Vishnitzer, Gerer, Klausenberger, Skverer, and Bratslaver Hasidim. The Satmar, with some 50,000 followers in the U.S. and Canada, are the largest [Hasidic] group, followed by the Bobovers and Lubavitchers. The Lubavitchers are known particularly for their spiritual outreach to nonobservant members of the Jewish community through a worldwide network of Habad houses and emissaries called shlichim. "
Hasidic Jews world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 82. "Hasidism: The revivalist movement founded by Israel Baal Shem Tov (in abbreviated form, the Besht) in eighteenth-century Podolia (south-eastern Poland), later extending to the whole of Eastern Europe and beyond. There are adherents of Hasidism (Hasidim) today in the state of Israel, the USA, England, France, and in many other countries.

Hasidism is less a movement of with ideas of its own than one in which ideas found in the classical Jewish sources, especially the Kabbalah, are given new life and fresh emphasis. The task of discovering in what this emphasis consists is rendered difficult because each of the early masters had his own interpretation of Hasidic doctrine. " [More, pg. 83.]

Hasidic Jews - Bobovers world - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "Hasidic sects take their names from the Eastern European towns in which they originated. Major groups include the Satmar, Lubavitcher, Bobover, Belzer, Vishnitzer, Gerer, Klausenberger, Skverer, and Bratslaver Hasidim. The Satmar, with some 50,000 followers in the U.S. and Canada, are the largest [Hasidic] group, followed by the Bobovers and Lubavitchers. "
Hasidic Jews - Eastern European Europe - - - - 1735 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 295-296. "HASIDISM, CHASIDISM. Two socio-religious movement in medieval and modern Jewish history, with mystical ideology. 1. German Hasidism... 2. Eastern European Hasidism. In the eighteenth century a second pietistic popular movement arose in Eastern Europe, where conditions were ripe for a new style of Jewish existence. In 1648 a Ukranian uprising against Poland brought with it widespread massacre of the Jewish population. Eighteen years later came first the elationa and then the sudden, bitter disappoinment caused by the messianic career and apostasy of Sabbatai Zvi... The movement was born in the 1730s when the Baal Shem Tov attraced to himself a select circle of preachers, scholars, mystics, and Jewish functionaries, who spread his ideals of spiritual renewal. In Slavic Europe, the domain to which its growth was largely restricted, it attracted many followers... "
Hasidic Jews - Eastern European Europe - - - - 1850 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 296. "...Eastern European Hasidism... It was a vigorous, powerful, and highly original movement, but by the middle of the nineteenth century it began to stagnate for internal reasons--i.e., institutionalization of charisma--and for external reasons--i.e., persistent rabbinic opposition and the growing forces of Jewish secularism. "
Hasidic Jews - German Germany - - - - 1300 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 295. "HASIDISM, CHASIDISM. Two socio-religious movement in medieval and modern Jewish history, with mystical ideology. 1. German Hasidism. This movement emerged in the Rhineland valley in the wake of the massacre of the Jews during the Crusades... 2. Eastern European Hasidism... "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch Israel - - - - 1948 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 439. "Lubavicher movement... Yaakov Yosef (1880-1950), the sixth zaddik... in 1948 helped found a Hasidic settlement, Kfar Habad, in Israel... "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch New York: Brooklyn - - - - 1950 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 439. "Lubavicher movement... Yaakov Yosef (1880-1950), the sixth zaddik, escaped Poland on the eve of the holocaust and settled in Brooklyn, New York. He built an extensive educational system... "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch New York: Brooklyn 30,000 - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Judaism; pg. 250. "the most recent leader of the Lubavitcher community, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson... Among the Brooklyn community of 30,000, the men invariably wear dark suits and overcoats, black hats, and full beards... "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch New York: Brooklyn: Crown Heights 20,000 7.00% - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 183. "Of the 300,000 residents of Crown Heights, 80% are black, 10% are white, 9% are Hispanic, and 1% are Asian. Most of the white population is Lubavitcher Hasidim. "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch New York: Brooklyn: Crown Heights 20,000 - - - 1995 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 95. "Since mid-century, the number of Lubavitchers has doubled about every ten years, so that by the mid-1990s there were perhaps a quarter of a million of them worldwide (making them the largest of the Hasidic courts today), with 15,000 to 20,000 living in Crown Heights [in NYC]. "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch Russia - - - - 1813 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 439. "Lubavicher movement. Important and vigorous group in Eastern European Hasidism; the name comes from the Russian town of Lubavich, where Dov Ber, second leader and son of the founder, settled in 1813. "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch world - - 1,500
units
- 1991 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 95. "But Lubavitchers have remained most active in the U.S. On college campuses, Chabad Houses have offered Sabbath dinners and services to young Jews living away from home. Several dozen yeshivas (religious schools) have been established around the country. So have summer camps, attended by tens of thousands of children each year. By the early 1990s, there were about 1,500 Lubavitcher outposts--schools, camps, synagogues, and other centers--worldwide, with most of them in the U.S. "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch world 200,000 - - - 1992 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993); pg. xiv-xv. "In the spring of 1992... the magazine of the New York Times ran a celebratory cover on the Lubavitcher rebbe... claimed that the Rebbe was 'lionized by his nearly 200,000 followers' and declared his movement 'a missionary juggernaut.' "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch world - - - - 1994 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 138-139. "Lubavitch: ...Many of Rabbi Menahem Mendel's followers hailed him as the Messiah, and went about singing in public places: 'We want the Messiah now', in the hope that God would reveal to the Rebbe his true identity as the hoped-for redeemer, to the consternation of most of the other Hasidim and traditional Orthodox Rabbis. The latter were now slow to point out the dangers of unbridled Messianic fervour, especially when the Messiah is identified with a particular, known leader. Even after the Rebbe's death many of his followers still retained belief in his Messianic role. "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch world 300,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) [Orig. source: Sheler, Jeffrey L., 1994. "A Movement Goes on Without Its Leader. " U.S. News & World Report 26 December: 94-102.] "It is impossible to determine the number of members of the Lubavitch group because unlike the other Hasidic groups, they are not concentrated in any one specific area. ...has an estimated membership of 250,000 to 300,000 worldwide. "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch world 250,000 - - - 1995 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 95. "Since mid-century, the number of Lubavitchers has doubled about every ten years, so that by the mid-1990s there were perhaps a quarter of a million of them worldwide (making them the largest of the Hasidic courts today), with 15,000 to 20,000 living in Crown Heights [in NYC]. "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch world 200,000 - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Judaism; pg. 250. "the most recent leader of the Lubavitcher community, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson... With a worldwide following of about 200,000, the rebbe commanded the respect and donations of millions of secular Jews as well, many of whom believe he might well be the long-awaited Ma-shi-akh, the Messiah. "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch world 250,000 - - - 1997 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 85. "From a tiny remnant of Holocaust survivors, they have grown to number perhaps a quarter of a million worldwide today. "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch world - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "The Satmar, with some 50,000 followers in the U.S. and Canada, are the largest [Hasidic] group, followed by the Bobovers and Lubavitchers. The Lubavitchers are known particularly for their spiritual outreach to nonobservant members of the Jewish community through a worldwide network of Habad houses and emissaries called shlichim. "
Hasidic Jews - Lubavitch world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 138-139. "Lubavitch: The branch of the Habad tendency in Hasidism with many thousands of followers all over the Jewish world. The second Rebbe of Habad, Dov Baer, settled in the Russian town of Lubavitch, after which this group of Hasidism is called. The sixth master, Rabbi Joseph Isaac Schneerson (1880-1950), settled in Brooklyn, USA, in 1940, where he was succeeded by his son-in-law, Rabbi Manahem Mendel Schneeson (1902-94), the seventh Lubavitcher Rebbe, who established a worldwide network of educational institutions and a major publishing house. "
Hasidic Jews - Satmar North America 50,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "The Satmar, with some 50,000 followers in the U.S. and Canada, are the largest [Hasidic/Ultra-Orthodox] group, followed by the Bobovers and Lubavitchers. "
Hasinai Confederacy North America - Southern Great Plains 4,000 - - - 1690 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Hasinai Confederacy world 4,000 - - - 1690 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
hate groups Alabama - - 39
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Alaska - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Arizona - - 8
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Arkansas - - 18
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups California - - 29
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Colorado - - 7
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Connecticut - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Delaware - - 2
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Florida - - 39
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Georgia, USA - - 30
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Hawaii - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Idaho - - 9
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Illinois - - 16
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Indiana - - 18
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Iowa - - 2
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Kansas - - 4
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Kentucky - - 8
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Louisiana - - 19
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Maine - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Maryland - - 8
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Massachusetts - - 6
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Michigan - - 14
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Minnesota - - 8
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Mississippi - - 27
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Missouri - - 17
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Montana - - 4
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Nebraska - - 5
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups Nevada - - 8
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups New Hampshire - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups New Jersey - - 12
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups New Mexico - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]
hate groups New York - - 23
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 [map on pg. 78-79] shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: "Active hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center " [map accompanied by table listing total number of hate groups for each state.]


hate groups, continued

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