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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

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Han, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Han China: Xinjiang: Urumqi 800,000 80.00% - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 41. "...Urumqi, a city with over one million people and the capital of Xinjian, is made up of around 80 percent Han Chinese. "
Han Taiwan - - - - 1997 Leibo, Steven A. East, Southeast Asia, and the Western Pacific 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 14. "Ethnic Background: Chinese, sometimes referred to as Han. The highlands are occupied by a small group of Malayo-Polynesian ancestry who resemble the people of Indonesia. "
Han world 1,000,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 243. "Han: Location: China; Taiwan; (as Overseas Chinese: Southeast Asia, Japan, North America, Oceania, and Europe; Population: 1 billion in mainland China; Language: Mandarin Chinese; Religion: Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism "; "The Han are the main body of the Chinese nation, having a long history and an age-old tradition. "; "Religion: Since the concept of patriarchal clan is deeply rooted in Han society, the continuity of patrilineal family is a matter of prime importance, having a great impact on attitudes and behavior even at the present. Another cultural trait deriving from the remote past is the Han belief in the idea of God's will. The Han have historically accommodated religions of diverse origins... " [NOTE: This statistic is of cultural/ethnic affiliation, NOT a distinct religion.]
Han Il Church Korea - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "Korea, since the 1960s, has seen the emergence of religious movements seeking to rediscover the indigenous Korean religion, that ancient religion which is believed to have prevailed prior to the importation of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Christianity. These movements include... the Tae Jong Church, the Han Il Church, the Chun Do Church, and countless small groups of folk religionists. "
Hanafi world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1465. "The Hanafi is traced to Abu Hanifa of Kufa who died in 767, but the real founders of the school were two of his pupils. It became the school of the Turkish Empire and the Indian subcontinent. "
Hanafi world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 293. "Hanafites. School of Islamic law named after Abu Hanifa (d. 767). It originated in Iraq and was the school adopted by the 'Abbasid Caliphs. It gained popularity in Transoxania, Khurasan, Afghanistan, India, and China. In the Mediterranean it became the school of the Ottoman empire, and is the one generally recognized in its former provinces... In modern times Hanafite principles have influenced family law by their incorporation into the code of several of the former Ottoman provinces, e.g. Turkey and Egypt, although, because of the adoption of Western style codes, these cannot still be said to belong to the Hanafite school. "
Hanafi world - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 223. "Four Sunni schools have emerged. The Hanafi, followers of Abu Hanifa (d. 767), emphasizes the use of reasoning. It was the official rite of the Ottoman Empire and is strong today in Turkey, Iraq, Syria, India and Central Asia. "
Hanafi world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 431. "...four major schools of law (madhlab, pl. madhahib) of Sunni Islam... Hanafites (named for Abu Hanifa) extend throughout Turkey, India, and into China. "
Hanbali Middle East - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 431. "...four major schools of law (...madhahib) of Sunni Islam... Among Sunnis, the Hanbalites (named for juror-theologian Ahmad ibn Hanbal) make up one of the strictest schools, which developed in Iraq and Syria and is now located in Saudi Arabia. "
Hanbali world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1465. "The Hanbali school is traced to Ahmad ibn Hanbal (d. 855) who had been a pupil of Shafii. In some respects it is stricter than the others. It is now found in central Arabia, and has had some influence on certain reformers in Egypt. "
Hanbali world - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 223. "Four Sunni schools have emerged... The Hanbali school follows Ahmad ibn Hanbal (d. 855) who believed in a literal interpretation of the Koran and the practice laid down by Muhammad, established by the Tradition. It is the official legal school of Saudi Arabia. "
Handsome Lake New York - - - - 1799 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 533. "In other instances, as a response to the radical change brough about by the impact of Euro-American culture, 'nativistic' and 'revivalistic' movements developed. Handsome Lake Religion -- as described by Wallace -- is a case in point. At the middle of the eighteenth century several thousand Senecas lived in the southwestern portion of New York State. Like other Iroquois, the Seneca had a social structure adapted to... However, between 1754... [and] 1797...divested of their power. The League of the Iroquois was not long respected... initial Seneca response to the progress of sociocultural disorganization was--in Wallace's terminology--'quasi-pathological': many became drunkards... But a 'revitalization movement' developed in 1799, based on a series of visions reported by... Handsome Lake... preached a code of religious and cultural reform. The Seneca were to give up alcohol; witchcraft was to cease; traditional ceremonies of the annual ritual calender were to be observed... "
Handsome Lake New York - - - - 1815 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 533. "Handsome Lake's code was generally accepted within a few years, and a group of sober, devout, orderly, and technologically up-to-date farming communities replaced what Wallace vividly describes as 'demoralized slums in the wilderness.' One tribal community had come to grips with its new status in a land now dominated by those who were not native to North America. "
Handsome Lake North America - - - - 1799 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1457. "Other missionaries worked in the United States among the Iroquois, and most of the people became Christians, though there was always a minority opinion against the preachers who persuaded them to accept the many injustices which they suffered at the hands of the master race. The minority became the followers of Handsome Lake, the brother of the famous chief Cornplanter. In June 1799 a vision came to Handsome Lake; he saw three noble beings who told of happier days to come. Later he was introduced to a fourth who was the Creator, who had taken pity on the suffering Indians. The new religion was a serious effort to reorganize the ancient Iroquois beliefs and preserve old customary ceremonies while adapting to the new knowledge which had become available. It was rther strict, and stood firm for abstinence from alcohol... Handsome Lake's prophetic mission was to bear its fruit much later, but he had given his people a new focus of unity in the revival of old tradition... "
Handsome Lake North America - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1457. "The present codified state of the Handsome Lake beliefs is well adapted to the needs of a new kind of Iroquois community living within a highly organized modern state. It is more important than the actual membership would suggest, because it has become the focus for the preservation of the Indian basic culture. The majority of Iroquois however go to one or other of the Christian churches. "
Handsome Lake USA - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1455. "Although the majority of Iroquois are now Christian, there is a remnant whose beliefs and culture are based on the visions of the prophet Handsome Lake. "
Hani China: Yunnan 1,250,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 247. "Hani: Alternate Names: Huoyi; Location: China (Yunnan); Population: 1.25 million; Language: Hani; Religion: Polytheism; ancestory worship; some Christianity "; "The Hani are polytheistic. They believe that there is a Heaven God, an Earth God, a Tree God, as well as a Village God and a House God to protect them... Since the beginning of the 20th century, a number of Hani have converted to Christianity. "
Hanis North America - Pacific Coast 2,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Miluk
Hanis world 2,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Miluk
Hanuno'o Philippines: Mindoro 6,000 1.82% - - 1975 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 482-483. "Mangyan (Hanuno'o group): Location: Philippines (island of Mindoro); Population: 6,000 (1970s); Language: Hanuno'o; Religion: Native spirit beliefs "; "The Hanuno'o are the best known of the various groups called 'Mangyan' living in the interior of the island of Mindoro. "; Pg. 483: The Hanuno'o live inland from the southernmost tip of Mindoro. In the 1970s, the Hanuno'o numbered 6,000 out of a total of 20-30,000 Mangyan (already a minority on an island inhabited by 300,000 Tagalog and Visayan settlers)... The Hanuno'o recognize certain named deities of creation, but their play only a minor role in everyday life. Ordinarily, more significant to them are nature spirits living in mountains, rocks... "
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) Australia 8 - 2
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "...Healthy, Happy, Holy Organisation (3HO)... The movement came to Australia in 1975 and now has two centres here with eight members. "
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) North America 20,000 - 100
units
- 1975 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 206. "By 1975, an estimated 20,000 North Americans living in some 100 self-supporting, self-sufficient ashrams, or religious retreats, had adopted the Sikh lifestyle through contact with 3HO. "
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) North America 20,000 - 100
units
- 1975 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 153. "By 1975 [Bhajan] was the leader of between 10,000 and 20,000 young Americans and Canadians who had adopted the Sikh lifestyle via the 3HO, living in more than 100 ashams and teaching centers throughout North America. "
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) North America 5,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 206. "In the early 1990s, however, numbers of those living in a community dropped to around 5,000 at most. "
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) North America 10,000 - 150
units
- 1995 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) In 1995 there was a count of 139 ashrams/or teaching centers in the United States, 11 in Canada, and 86 additional centers in 26 other countries.
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) North America - - 236
units
28
countries
1995 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) In 1995 there was a count of 139 ashrams/or teaching centers in the United States, 11 in Canada, and 86 additional centers in 26 other countries.
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) USA - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 319-320. "...American religious movements even thought their teachings... are traditionally Hindu. The following are some better-known examples of these missionaries and their movements... Yogi Bhajan (3HO/Sikh Dharma Brotherhood)... His Amerian followers were organized into religious communes which Yogi Bhajan called the 'Happy/Healthy/Holy Organization' (3HO). In the 1970s the emphasis shifted toward the teachings of the Sikh tradition of the Punjab, and the movement became known as the Sikh Dharma Brotherhood... The movement has been centered in California, but has branches throughout the United States. "
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) world 20,000 - 100
units
- 1975 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 153. "By 1975 [Bhajan] was the leader of between 10,000 and 20,000 young Americans and Canadians who had adopted the Sikh lifestyle via the 3HO, living in more than 100 ashams and teaching centers throughout North America. "
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) world 7,800 - 140
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "So far, 65 religious groups and associations have completed a questionnaire and are listed below... The Healthy, Happy, Holy Organisation (3HO) commenced on January 5, 1969 in Los Angeles when Harbhajan Singh Khalsa Yogiji MA PhD, 'Yogi Bhajan', started teaching in the West. It is not primarily a religious association, its focus is on health and personal development... Worldwide the movement has 140 centres with approximately 1,800 core members and 6,000 peripheral members. "
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) - active North America 4,000 - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 153. "Today, however, the fully committed membership of the movement numbers less than 4000. "
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) - active world 4,000 - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 153. "Today, however, the fully committed membership of the movement numbers less than 4000. "
Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization (3HO) - core world 1,800 - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "So far, 65 religious groups and associations have completed a questionnaire and are listed below... The Healthy, Happy, Holy Organisation (3HO) commenced on January 5, 1969 in Los Angeles when Harbhajan Singh Khalsa Yogiji MA PhD, 'Yogi Bhajan', started teaching in the West. It is not primarily a religious association, its focus is on health and personal development... Worldwide the movement has 140 centres with approximately 1,800 core members and 6,000 peripheral members. "
Harijan India 80,000,000 15.00% - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 295. "Harijan (Sanskrit; lit. 'children of god'). A euphemism coined by Mahatma Gandhi to refer to the untouchables of India. Inherently polluting to members of other Hindu castes, the Harijans stand outside the fourfold caste structure of Indian society. Yet Harijans comprise about 15 percent of the Indian population and number nearly 80 million spread over all parts of the country... many Harijans have adopted Christianity or Buddhism, whose egalitarian principles appeal to the underprivileged. "
Harmony Society Germany - - 1
unit
- 1790 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 499. "Initially the [Harmonists, or Rappites were] composed of the personal following of its remarkable, autocratic and impressive leader George Rapp, a weaver, who in the 1780s began to conduct his own religious meetings in his native village in Wurttemberg, Germany, expressing severe disapproval of the outward show and ritual of the Lutheran Church. Wurttemberg was a strong centre of sectarianism at this time, and Rapp soon acquired a significant following from his own and neighboring villages. "
Harmony Society Indiana - - 1
unit
- 1814 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 500. "Yet within ten years of first settling in Pennsylvania [1804], the Harmonists, disturbed by the close encroachments of the world around their land, seeking water power and a milder climate better suited tot he vine, and despite all the labour involved in beginning again the work of creating a settlement, put up the town of Harmony for sale, and moved to the bank of the River Wabash in Indiana Territory... As a frontier socity, their achievement in Indiana was all the more remarkable, and New Harmony was regarded as 'a wonder of the West.' "
Harmony Society Pennsylvania - - 1
unit
- 1804 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 500. "It was after the keenest members of the sect had emigrated to America, in 1804, that communism proper was adopted by them... The Harmony Society... bought land and, after considerable hardship in the early days built a model village on the Connoquenessing Creek, near Pittsburg in Pennsyvania. The community regarded itself as a Church, in which all members surrendered their property to the society and pledged themselves to its laws. "
Harmony Society Pennsylvania - - 1
unit
- 1824 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 500. "The Harmonists, meanwhile, set up a third prosperous colony, named Economy, on the Ohio River in Pennsylvania. Again, they established a town that was a model of neatness and order. "
Harmony Society USA - - 1
unit
- 1804 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 500. "It was after the keenest members of the sect had emigrated to America, in 1804, that communism proper was adopted by them... The Harmony Society... bought land and, after considerable hardship in the early days built a model village on the Connoquenessing Creek, near Pittsburg in Pennsyvania. "
Harmony Society USA - - 1
unit
- 1814 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 500. "Yet within ten years of first settling in Pennsylvania [1804], the Harmonists... put up the town of Harmony for sale, and moved to the bank of the River Wabash in Indiana Territory. "
Harmony Society USA - - - - 1830 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 499. "A strong injunction to celibacy and community of goods were the distinguishing features of another sect that flourished in 19th century America, the Harmonists, or Rappites. This sect built successively, at ten-year intervals, three substantial villages in the states of Pennsylvania and Indiana. "
Harmony Society USA - - - - 1831 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 500. "Celibacy was, however, a severe test... As a result the average age of its members rose and its numbers began to decline. A schism occurred in 1831, when an impressive imposter arrived at Economy [Pennsylvania], presenting himself as His Royal Highness Maximilian of Este, Ambassador of Christ. The Harmonists were undergoing an internal crisis at the time and were anxious for the coming of Christ... a number seceded with Count Leon, as he was also known, and continued to practice communism in other parts of America; this reduced the community even further. "
Harmony Society USA - - - - 1840 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 500. "Throughout the 1830s and 40s the [Harmony] Society continued to prosper but, having completely closed its ranks, ensured its own decline. Its reserves of wealth were considerable, and became the subject of prolonged litigation in the 20th century... In its day, the Harmony Socity had been a pioneer of the oil industry and had built the first oil pipelines. "
Harmony Society world - - 1
unit
1
country
1790 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 499. "Initially the [Harmonists, or Rappites were] composed of the personal following of... George Rapp..., who in the 1780s began to conduct his own religious meetings in his native village in Wurttemberg, Germany... "
Harranian religion Asia - - - - -1500 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1213. "Harranian Religion. The city of Harran in northwest Mesopotamia became in ancient times the centre of a mysterious religion that included the worship of planets. Information about this religion is sparse and difficult to interpret, especially since much of it comes from hostile sources. As far back as the second millenium BC, Harran was an important centrue of the cult of Sin, the moon god. The original centre of the cult was the Sumerian city of Ur, known in the bible as Ur of the Chaldeans. The Bible preserves an interesting connection between these two cult centres of moon worship; for according to the book of Genesis (11.31) Abraham, a native of Ur, journeyed with his father Terah an dwife Sarah from Ur to settle in Haran. "
Harranian religion Asia - - - - 1200 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1213. "The archeological evidence, fragmentary and enigmatic as it unfortunately is, is supplemented by equally puzzing accounts by early Moslem writers. They identified the Harranian pagans with the Sabians, mentioned in the Koran as one of the religious communities permitted to exist. According to these writers, the Sabians of Harran recognized a supreme deity who was the primal cause of the universe. The Sabians were also reputed to celebrate 'mystery' rites, addressed principally to Shamal, lord of the jinn... The Harranians and their planetary religion disappeared during the Mongol invasions in the 12th or 13th century. Some scholars believe that the Sabians still survive in the Mandaeans, a religious community living on the lower reaches of the Tigris and Euphrates; on the available evidence this identification seems unlikely. "
Harrist Church Cote d'Ivoire - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 228. "Some Ivoirians are followers of the Liberian prophet, William Wade Harris, who spread his version of Christianity along the coast in the early part of the 20th century; the Harrist church continues to gain adherents in urban areas. "
Harrist Church Cote d'Ivoire - - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: National Council of Churches of Christ in the U.S.A.; web page: news release represents a modest edit of the wrap-up prepared by the World Council of Churches (1998). Viewed 7 Oct. 1999. "Membership of the WCC rose to a record 339 churches as the Assembly welcomed eight more... six of the new churches are African: the United Church of Christ in Zimbabwe, the Harrist Church in Ivory Coast... "
Hasidic Jews Belgium 15,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "In Europe, London and Manchester together have a Traditional-Orthodox community of about 15,000, and Antwerp is home to an equal number. "
Hasidic Jews Canada 20,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "There are about 20,000 Hasidim in Canada, with the largest concentrations in Montreal and Toronto. "
Hasidic Jews Europe - - - - 1800 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1219. "Spreading from the ghettos of Poland to Rumania, Hungary, the Ukraine and other parts of Eastern Europe, Hasidism produced a rich vein of legend and folklore. "
Hasidic Jews Europe - - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 167. "Hitler's final solution, ridding the world of 'undesirables' such as Jews and Gypsies, decimated the Hasidic population in Europe. After World War II, the countries of Western Europe, beset by the ravages of war, were unable to accommodate large numbers of refugees. The few small Hasidic enclaves that remain in Europe are in Belgium and England. "
Hasidic Jews Europe 30,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "In Europe, London and Manchester together have a Traditional-Orthodox community of about 15,000, and Antwerp is home to an equal number. "
Hasidic Jews Germany - - - - 1200 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1219. "The circles of Jewish zealots in Palestine who took up arms, in the times of the Maccabees, against the repression of Jewish religion were known as Hasidim, and the same term was used by a circle of Jewish mystics that flourished in Germany in the 12th and 13th centuries. There is, however, now historic connection between these earlier movements and the 18th century Polish-Russian Hasidism. "
Hasidic Jews Israel 300,000 - - - 1992 Marty, Martin E. & R. Scott Appleby. The Glory and the Power: The Fundamentalist Challenge to the Modern World; Boston: Beacon Press (1992); pg. 96. "Indeed, the 300,000 or so haredim [ultra-Orthodox Jews] who live in Israel (an additional 250,000 are in the Diaspora, with major communities in the United States and Canada) did not migrate there to become part of the Zionist enterprise. "
Hasidic Jews Israel 3,500,000 - - - 1993 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: 10/16/93 issue of GLOBAL PRAYER DIGEST); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) "The ultra-orthodox Haredim Jews are a sect of the 3.5 million Jews in Israel. "
Hasidic Jews Israel - 20.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Ruth, Elaine (of Religion New Service). "Orthodox Youth May Face Draft Into Israeli Military " in Salt Lake Tribune (Saturday, December 12, 1998) "In Israel's fractious parliamentary political system, ultra-Orthodox [Haredim] parties wield political power beyond their community's size, which has been estimated at less than 20% of Israel's Jewish population. "
Hasidic Jews Israel - - - - 1999 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 69-70. "Orthodox Jews make up only a small portion of the population. "; Pg. 70: "About 6% of the Orthodox are known as ultra-Orthodox Jews because their views are even more extreme than those of the Orthodox. "
Hasidic Jews New York - - - - 1994 Gaustad, Edwin S. Church and State in America (series: Religion in American Life). New York: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 132. "The Kiryas Joel Village, a small community of some 12,000 residents about 50 miles northwest of New York City, sought public funding for 200 to 300 handicapped and learning-disabled children. The legislature of New York responded with a law that carved out a special school district for these Hasidic Jewish children. By a vote of 6 to 3, the Court's majority found that political boundaries had been drawn on religious, rather than neutral grounds... "
Hasidic Jews New York 250,000 - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 163. "Life in the Williamsburg, Boro Park, and Crown Heights districts of Brooklyn and in the Ne Square Community of Rockland County is, for nearly a quarter of a million Hasidic Jews, much as it was in their communities of Eastern and Central Europe 200 years ago. "
Hasidic Jews New York: Brooklyn - - - - 1990 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990); pg. 217. "...there are areas of Brooklyn in New York City -- notably Williamsburg and Boro Park -- that have become the preserve of ultra-orthodox Jews, who wear the traditional eastern European dress of black kaftan and broad-brimmed hat as well as sidelocks... "
Hasidic Jews New York: Brooklyn 150,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "Brooklyn, New York, has North America's largest concentration of Hasidim--an estimated 150,000, located mainly in the neighborhoods of Boro Park, Williamsburg, and Crown Heights. "
Hasidic Jews North America 250,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "The total number of Traditional-Orthodox Jews worldwide is estimated at over 650,000, out of a total Jewish population of about 13 million. Over half live in Israel, mostly in Jerusalem and B'nai Barak, and most of the remainder--some 250,000--live in North America. "
Hasidic Jews United Kingdom 15,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "In Europe, London and Manchester together have a Traditional-Orthodox community of about 15,000, and Antwerp is home to an equal number. "
Hasidic Jews USA - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 776. "Brooklyn, New York, has North America's largest concentration of Hasidim--an estimated 150,000, located mainly in the neighborhoods of Boro Park, Williamsburg, and Crown Heights. There are also well-established Hasidic communities elsewhere in New York City, as well as in such diverse cities as Cleveland, Detroit, Los Angeles, Baltimore, Miami, St. Louis, Philadelphia, and Denver. "
Hasidic Jews world 10,000 - - - 1760 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 164. "Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov -- the Besht... At the time of his death in 1760, it is estimated that he had 10,000 followers. "


Hasidic Jews, continued

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