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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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back to Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America, world

Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America world 1,000,000 - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973); pg. 17. "Greek is also used in the Greek Church in North and South America, which has over 1,000,000 members, is headed by an Archbishop, and is under the jurisdiction of the Patriarchate of Constantinople. "
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America world 1,950,000 - 535
units
- 1977 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 122. "Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America... New York, NY [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1977 the Archdiocese reported 1,950,000 members, 535 churches and 655 priests. "
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America world 2,500,000 - 535
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 183. "Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America... There are 2.5 million members in 535 churches and 11 dioceses... "
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America world 2,500,000 - 535
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). -
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America world 2,000,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* web site: "Religions and Health Care " by Fr. J Mahoney, M.Div.; web page: "Membership Reported " (viewed 20 Feb. 1999); [Orig. source: J. Gordon Melton. Encyclopedia of American Religions, 6th edition, copyright 1999, Gale Publishing] Table: "Membership Reported "; 3 key columns: "Religious Group ", "Year ", "Membership " (which always specifies location, whether U.S., North America, or Total]; listed in table as "Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America "
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America world 1,900,000 - - - 1997 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997); pg. 274. "The largest Orthodox body in the western hemisphere is the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America consisting of the Archdiocese of New York, 9 dioceses in U.S., & 1 diocese each in Canada & South America; an estimated 1.9 million members. "
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America Wyoming - - 5
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America.']
Greek Orthodox Church of America USA - - 10
units
- 1974 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 65. Listed as "Greek Orthodox Church of America "
Greek Orthodox Church of America USA - - 10
units
- 1975 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 123. "Current address not obtained for third edition.; The Greek Orthodox Church of America was formed on Dec. 1, 1971, at a meeting held in Miami, Florida, for the purpose of forming a federation of independent Greek orthodox Churches... Membership: In the mid-1970s the Church had 10 parishes scattered around the U.S. from Miami to Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Tennessee. "
Greek Orthodox Church of America USA 1,500,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Mims, Bob. "Greek Orthodox Wince at Church Scandal " in Salt Lake Tribune (Saturday, 26 Sepbember 1998). The battle for control of the 1.5 million-member Greek Orthodox Church in America has spilled into the federal courts of the East Coast.
Greek Orthodox Church of America world - - 10
units
1
country
1975 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 123. "Current address not obtained for third edition.; The Greek Orthodox Church of America was formed on Dec. 1, 1971, at a meeting held in Miami, Florida, for the purpose of forming a federation of independent Greek orthodox Churches... Membership: In the mid-1970s the Church had 10 parishes scattered around the U.S. from Miami to Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Tennessee. "
Greek Orthodox Diocese of New York world - - - 2
countries
1965 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 123. "The Greek Orthodox Diocese of New York was formed in 1964 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by priests and laity formerly under the jurisdiction of Archbishop Iakovos of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America. They objected to the administration of Archbishop Iakovos... In 1965 jurisdiction was extended to Australia. Archbishop Photios was in communion with the late Bishop Dionisije of the Serbian Orthodox Free Diocese of the United States and Canada and Bishop Alexis of Adelaide, Australia, of the Byelorussian Autocephalic Church. Membership: Not reported. "
Greenpeace world 5,000,000 - - 27
countries
1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 202-203. "Eco-Tribes... Greenpeace, the world's largest environmental group, has grown so powerful that even nation-states have learned to keep their distance. It achieved martyrdom in 1985 when French government agents sank the Rainbow Warrior, which was protesting nuclear testing in the Pacific. One person was killed. The French government paid an $8 million fine to New Zealand, and donations to Greenpeace tripled. Since then, leaders shudder whenever a detachment of the powerful Greenpeace armada approaches one of their naval vessels. Their strongest weapon is the video camera that connects them with the evening news worldwide. Greenpeace International has offices in twenty-seven countries, more than 5 million members, a multimillion dollar budget, and numerous high-priced lawyers and lobbyists... Greenpeace has sparked the public imagination to support its views. But success in outflanking powerful nation-states is perhaps best illustrated by Greenpeace's ban on whaling. "
Gros Ventre Montana 2,100 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 35. "Gros Ventre... Today there are about 2,100 on the Fort Belknap Montana reservation, which they share with the Assiniboin. "
Gros Ventre North America 3,000 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 35. Estimates of total population from another source.
Groton Baptist Conference Connecticut - - - - 1785 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 110. "In 1781 the Shaftsbury Association brought together a number of Baptist churches in southern Vermont, western Massachusetts and the eastern areas of New York state. In 1785 the Groton Conference was organized to serve many of the Baptist churches of Connecticut. "
Grove of the Unicorn USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 75. "Grove of the Unicorn, Lady Galadriel & Lord Athanor, P.O. Box 13384, Atlanta, GA 30324. American Eclectic Tradition; teaching/working/celebratory group focused on balance and personal evolution; ongoing classes available; sabbats open by invitation... "
Guajiros South America - - - 2
countries
1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 199. "Guajiros: Location: Venezuela and Colombia (Guajira peninsula, which borders the Caribbean to the north and east, and Venezuela and the Gulf of Maracaibo to the west) "; "Religious life for the Guajiros is a mix of the Catholic beliefs brought to them by the Spaniards who conquered the New World, and the older belief system that includes a different view of the afterlife. "
Guale North America - Southeastern Woodlands 4,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Guale world 4,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Guarani Argentina - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "; in an area where southernmost Brazil borders Argentina and Uruguay
Guarani Brazil - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "; in an area where southernmost Brazil borders Argentina and Paraguay
Guarani Paraguay - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "; in an area where southernmost Brazil borders Argentina and Paraguay
Guarani South America - - - 2
countries
1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 202-203. "Guaranis: Location: Paraguay; Brazil; Language: Guarani; Religion: Traditional indigenous religions "; "Not all Guaranis profess identical beliefs. Among the three major groups that remain today, known as the Chiripas, the Mbayas, and the Pai-Kaiovas, there are some interesting differences. Generally, they believe that every person has an earthly soul and a divine one... Some Guaranis believe in reincarnation; others, who have had more Christian influences, believe that evildoers go to a land of darkness, whereas good people go to the Land Without Evil... Shamans often isolate themselves for periods of time in jungles or forests and live austerely... "
Gumanapantha India - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: Jainworld; web page: "History of various sects " (viewed 16 Jan. 1999) "Gumanapantha originated in the 18th. Century A.D. and flourished mainly during that century. It was prevalent in several parts of Rajasthan, and it is found now in some areas of Rajasthan around Jaipur. "
Gurdjieff France - - - - 1949 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 287. "Gurdjieff, Georges Ivanovitch (1872-1949). Founder of the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in Fountainbleau, France, where, through calisthenics and music he helped his followers to higher planes of consciousness. He claimed to base his teachings on those of a 'hidden brotherhood' in Central Asia. "
Gurdjieff New York - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 287. "Gurdjieff, Georges Ivanovitch (1872-1949)... The Gurdjieff Foundation of New York continues his work, though now his writings are the focus of mystic contemplation and philosophical speculation. "
Gurdjieff USA 5,000 - - - 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 178. "Peter Rowley, in New Gods in America, estimates that there are about 5,000 disciples of Gurdjieff in America today. That in itself is a remarkable figure considering the fact that Gurdjieff's unusual ideas were supposedly dead and buried when Gurdjieff himself died in 1949. "
Gurdjieff USA 5,000 - 4
units
- 1996 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia); web page: "Gurdjieff " (viewed 19 April 1999). Prepared by Manya Rosypal, New Religious Movements student, Fall 1996, Last Modified: 02/15/99. "Size of Group: No specific numbers are reported; however, there are an estimated 5000 members in the U.S. Most are white, middle-class, college educated people living in metropolitan areas. Gurdjieff Foundations exist in New York, San Fransisco, Los Angeles, Washington, DC, and are the only places where the ideas are taught effectively. "
Gurdjieff world - - - 7
countries
1949 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1189. "In addition to the activities in his own apartment, Gurdjieff now instituted at the Salle Pleyel daily practices of the Movements that were so essential a part of this teaching. But it was not only in Paris that the Work progressed so vigorously year after year. There were groups in England and the United States and others were not established in Holland, Sweden, Germany and South America. During what was to be his last visit to America, on 13 January 1949 Gurdjieff announced that he was ready to publish All and Everything. "
Gurdjieff world - - - 5
countries
1955 Needleman, Jacob. "G. I. Gurdjieff and His School " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992); pg. 377. "After Gurdjieff's death in Paris in 1949, his work was carried on by... Jeanne De Salzmann, under whose guidance centers of study were gradually established in Paris, New York, London, and Caracas. Over the past 30 years other centers of work have radiated from them in major cities in the Western world. The pupils living in America established the Gurdjieff Foundation of New York in 1953. Shortly thereafter, groups were started on the West Coast and in Canada. " [Countries: France, U.S., U.K., Venezuela, Canada]
Gurdjieff world 10,000 - - - 1992 Needleman, Jacob. "G. I. Gurdjieff and His School " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992); pg. 377. "The pupils living in America established the Gurdjieff Foundation of New York in 1953. Shortly thereafter, groups were started on the West Coast and in Canada. Similar branches of varying size have been formed throughout the world and at present there may be between five and ten thousand persons in the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Middle East studying this teaching under the guidance of pupils who worked personally with Gurdjieff when he was alive. The main centers of study remain Paris, New York, and London... "
Gurma Togo - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Guro Cote d'Ivoire - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Gurungs Nepal 210,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 235-236. "Gurungs: Alternate Names: Tamu; Location: Nepal (central Himalayan Mountain region); Population: 210,000; Religion: Mix of Tibetan Buddhism, Hinduism, and local animistic practices. "; "Gurung religion is thus a mix of Buddhism, Hinduism, and local animistic practices. It clearly reflects the group's tribal origins, as well as its transitional location between the Hindu and Buddhist cultural worlds. "
Gurunsi Burkina Faso - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Gush Emunim Israel - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 280. "Gush Emunim (Community of Believers): Formed in February 1974 by young Isaeli activists who broke away from the National Religious Party. Membership open to religious and non-religious. Aimed to settle the historic site of the biblical land of Israel. In 1974 and 1975 pioneered unauthorized new settlements in 'Judea', area populated by Arabs. In the 1980s, with some of its members being tried for terrorist offences against Arabs, it became widely regarded as a militant messianic movement. "
Gush Emunim West Bank 25,000 - - - 1992 Marty, Martin E. & R. Scott Appleby. The Glory and the Power: The Fundamentalist Challenge to the Modern World; Boston: Beacon Press (1992); pg. 109. "Today a Jew does not need to join the Gush in order to live in the West Bank--at least 75 percent of the 100,000 [Jewish] settlers there are not gush members... "
Gusii Kenya 1,300,000 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 202. "Gusii: Location: Western Kenya; Population: 1.3 million (1989); Religion: Christianity mixed with ancestory cult beliefs "; "Most Gusii today claim to be adherents of some Christian church. There are four major denominations in Gusiiland: Roman Catholic, Seventh-Day Adventist, Swedish Lutheran, and the Pentecostal Assemblies of God... Although churches are very active, aspects of non-Christian beliefs continue to permeate the life of most Gusii. "
Gusii Kenya - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Guyana Congregational Union Guyana 2,452 0.30% 38
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Guyana Congregational Union (GCU) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Guyana Congregational Union (GCU)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 825,000... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 2,452/38. "
Guyana Congregational Union world 2,452 - 38
units
1
country
1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Guyana Congregational Union (GCU) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Guyana Congregational Union (GCU)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 825,000... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 2,452/38. "
Gwena Zimbabwe - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Ha Tanzania - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Hafiziyya Yemen - - - - 1171 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 366. "A new subdivision developed among the Must'alians after the assassination of al-Amir in 1129. Those in Yemen supported the claims made for his infant son al-Tayyib, and came to be known as Tayyibiyya. In Egypt, al-Amir's cousin was proclaimed imam and caliph with the title al-Hafiz. The Hafiziyya, after the overthrow of the Fatimids in 1171, gradually disintegrated... "
Haida North America 8,000 - - - 1760 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 78. "Haida... Numbered around 8,000 in 1760, there were more than 1,700 in 1984. "
Haida North America 1,700 - - - 1984 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 78. "Haida... Numbered around 8,000 in 1760, there were more than 1,700 in 1984. "
Haidaris world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 448. "A related [Sufi] order [to the Rifai], the Haidaris of Khurasan, inserted iron rings in their hands, ears, and necks? "
HaKibbutz HaDatai Israel 6,200 - - - 1978 "Judaism and Modernization " in Social Forces (Vol. 62:1, Sept. 1983); pg. 10-11, 27. "...the smallest of the 4 major kibbutz federations in Israel, HaKibbutz HaDati (RKF), the religious Zionist federation..., whose 16 settlements constituted about 5% of the total kibbutzim in Israel in 1982. "; [pg. 27] "In 1978 the total pop. of the RKF settlements was about 6,200. "
Hakka world 38,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 239-240. "Hakka: Alternate Names: Han Chinese; Location: China; Taiwan; Malaysia; Singapore; Thailand; Population: 38 million; Language: Hakka (southern China dialect); Religion: Combination of Buddhist and Daoist beliefs; ancestor worship "; "Hakka religion combines Buddhist and Daoist beliefs; no unifying beliefs define a distinct Hakka religion. Hakka practice a form of domestic religion called ancestor worship... " [NOTE: This statistic is of cultural/ethnic affiliation, NOT a distinct religion.]
Halchidhoma North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 3,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Halchidhoma world 3,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Hall Deliverance Foundation USA 3,200 - 60
units
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 257. "Membership: In 1984, The Foundation reported 60 associated churches, 60 ministers, and 3,200 members across the United States. "
Hall Deliverance Foundation world 153,200 - - 21
countries
1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Deliverance Pentecostals; pg. 256-257. "Hall Deliverance Foundation... Phoenix, AZ [H.Q.]... established in 1956 in San Diego, California, as the focus of the ministry of the Rev. Franklin Hall, an independent Pentecostal minister, who began his ministerial career in 1946 a a Methodist. Hall also founded and pastored the International Healing Cathedral in San Diego, California... Hall continues to travel the U.S. from his base in Phoenix... He distribues numerous pieces of literature and has recenty begun a television ministry. Affiliated work takes place in Mexico, Canada, the Bahamas, Australia, New Zealand, Great Britain, West Germany, Finland, France, Sweden, the Philippines, Nigeria, Ghana, the Ivory Coast, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Kenya, Malaya, South Africa, and India. Membership: In 1984, The Foundation reported 60 associated churches, 60 ministers, and 3,200 members across the United States. There are approximately 150,000 members overseas. "
Hallelujah Venezuela - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 364-365. "Pemon: Alternate names: Arecuna, Kamarakoto, Taurepan; Location: Venezuela; Population: Unknown; Religion: Indigenous beliefs mingled with Christian elements "; Pg. 365: "...Pemon have been relatively spared the influence of the modern nation-state... [but] presence of missions has left is mark. Most of the Amerindian thoughts & consciousness came to be mixed to a lesser or higher degree with Christian elements. Chichikrai is the name for Jesus Christ in 3 syncretistic Christian Amerindian cults: Hallelujah, Chochiman, & San Miguel. These cults have the nature of a spiritual movement... Some Hallelujah beliefs are similar to Christian beliefs. They believe in God and Jesus Christ as his son but do not acknowledge the concept of salvation through Jesus Christ's death and resurrection... "
Halyikwamai North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 2,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Halyikwamai world 2,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Hamas Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 281. "HAMAS (Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya) (Movement of the Islamic Resistance): A fundamentalist Islamic movement that emerged during the early months of the intifada first in Gaza and then on the West Bank. Considers itself a link in the 'chain of jihad' that started with Qassam's rebellion in Palestine in the 1930s, the holy war declared following the United Nation's partition resolution of November 1947, and the activities of the Muslim Brotherhood after 1968. "
Hamas world - - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 191-192. "Laced across this grass-roots, decentralized network are more formal organizations--the Islamic Group, the Islamic Jihad, the Hezbollah, Hamas... and dozens more--each group connected by secret memberships, international bank transfers, telephone, and global couriers. In the fundamentalist movement, no one person or group of people has control. "
Han China - 98.00% - - 1992 Peddicord, Kathleen (ed). The World's Best: The Ultimate Book for the International Traveler. Baltimore, MD: Agora, Inc. (1992); pg. 253. "Although 98% of China's population is made up of Han people, the remaining 2% contains nearly 50 million members of minority groups. "
Han China 1,113,200,000 92.00% - - 1996 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 8-9. "Population: 1,210,000,000 (1996)... Ethnic Groups: Han Chinese, 92%; Zhuang, 1.33%; Mancu, .75%; Hui, .67%; Miao, .67%; Uygur, .58%; Yi, .57%; Tibetan, .42%; Mongol, .42% "
Han China 1,111,500,032 95.00% - - 1997 Leibo, Steven A. East, Southeast Asia, and the Western Pacific 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 13. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Han China - 90.00% - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 36. "The Chinese consider themselves as Han, descended from the Han dynasty that was a pivotal point in Chinese history. Although over 90 percent of Chinese are ethnically Han, the distinction between Han and other racial groups is not black and white. The notion of being Chinese - Han Chinese - is to some degree a cultural concept, an acceptance of Chinese values. The Han Chinese are, of course, derived from a distinctive racial background, but over the centuries, the Han absorbed racial minorities. The Han Chinese have traditionally populated the eastern part of the country, leaving the empty spaces to the west and north, at least up until modern times, to the minority ethnic groups. (Within China, only in Tibet is a national minority group actually the majority, with 98% of the population.) "
Han China: Inner Mongolia - 80.00% - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 41. "In Inner Mongolia, the Han have predominated for decades, and now represent 90 percent of the population... It is mainly the nomadic population who are Mongolians; almost all settled farmers, entrepreneurs and people living in towns and cities are Han Chinese. "
Han China: Xinjiang - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 41. "In the autonomous region of Xinjiang, Uighurs remain the largest existing ethnic group, but make up only 45 percent of the population. Only when grouped together with the Kazakhs, Kirghiz and others do Uighurs constitute an Islamic, Turkic-speaking majority. Forty years ago, 80 percent of the population fulfilled these criteria. But now, the large cities have a majority of Han Chinese (except for Kashi) "


Han, continued

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