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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Fundamental Brethren Church USA 200 - 4
units
1
country
1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Brethren; pg. 317. "Fundamental Brethren Church was formed in 1962 by former membrs of four congregatoins of the Church of the Brethren in Mitchell County, North Carolina, under the leadership of Calvin Barnett... By 1967 there were four congregations with 200 members. "
Fundamental Brethren Church USA 200 - 3
units
1
country
1975 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 317. "Fundamental Brethren Church... Membership: In the 1970s there were 3 congregations of less than 200 members. "
Fundamental Gospel Churches, Association of Maryland - - 1
unit
- 1954 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 312. "formed in 1954 by the coming together of 3 independent Brethren congregations: Calvary Chapel of Hartsville, Ohio; Webster Mills Free Brethren Church of McConnellsburg, Pennsylvania; and Little Country Chapel of Myersburg, Maryland. "
Fundamental Gospel Churches, Association of Maryland - - 1
unit
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 313. "In 1980 there were an estimated 150 members in three congregations. "
Fundamental Gospel Churches, Association of Ohio - - 1
unit
- 1954 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 312. "formed in 1954 by the coming together of 3 independent Brethren congregations: Calvary Chapel of Hartsville, Ohio; Webster Mills Free Brethren Church of McConnellsburg, Pennsylvania; and Little Country Chapel of Myersburg, Maryland. "
Fundamental Gospel Churches, Association of Ohio - - 1
unit
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 313. "In 1980 there were an estimated 150 members in three congregations. "
Fundamental Gospel Churches, Association of Pennsylvania - - 1
unit
- 1954 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 312. "formed in 1954 by the coming together of 3 independent Brethren congregations: Calvary Chapel of Hartsville, Ohio; Webster Mills Free Brethren Church of McConnellsburg, Pennsylvania; and Little Country Chapel of Myersburg, Maryland. "
Fundamental Gospel Churches, Association of Pennsylvania - - 1
unit
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 313. "In 1980 there were an estimated 150 members in three congregations. "
Fundamental Gospel Churches, Association of USA - - 3
units
1
country
1954 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Brethren; pg. 312. "Association of Fundamental Gospel Churches... Canton, OH [H.Q.]... was formed in 1954 by the coming together of three independent Brethren congregations: Calvary Chapel of Hartsville, Ohio; Webster Mills Free Brethren Church of McConnellsburg, Pennsylvania; and Little Country Chapel of Myersburg, Maryland. "
Fundamental Gospel Churches, Association of USA 150 - 3
units
1
country
1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 313. "Membership: In 1980 there were an estimated 150 members in three congregations. "
Fundamental Methodist Church Missouri 1,037 0.02% 13
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 707. [Listed as 'Fundamental Methodist Church, Inc..']
Fundamental Methodist Church USA 745 - 15
units
- 1975 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 190-191. "Fundamental Methodist Church... Springfield, MO... Membership: Not reported. In 1975 there were 15 churches... and 745 members. The church supports a mission in Matamoros, Mexico. "
Fundamental Methodist Church USA - - 16
units
2
countries
1975 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 190-191. "Fundamental Methodist Church... Springfield, MO... Membership: Not reported. In 1975 there were 15 churches... and 745 members. The church supports a mission in Matamoros, Mexico. "
Fundamental Methodist Church USA 1,075 - 12
units
- 1990 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Fundamental Methodist Church, Inc.. "
Fundamental Methodist Church USA 1,037 - 13
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Fundamental Methodist Church, Inc..']
Fundamental Ministers and Churches, Association of world - - - 3
countries
1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 203. "Association of Fundamental Ministers and Churches, Inc. was formed in 1931 by Rev. Fred Bruffett, Hallie Bruffett (his wife), Rev. Paul Bennett, Rev. George Fisher, & 6 other former ministers of the Church of God (Anderson, Indiana). Bennett had been disfellowshipped because of his fellowshipping with other churches. The Association believes that the new birth is the only necessity for fellowship... There are 25 state conventions. Missions are conducted in Guatemala, Hong Kong, & Alaska. Membership: Not reported. "
Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Canada 600 - - - 1998 Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought (Summer 1998); pg. 14. -
Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 7,000 - - - 1998 Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought (Summer 1998); pg. 14. -
Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 6,000 - - - 1998 "Spotlight on Utah Polygamy " in Washington Post (Aug. 9, 1998); pg. A3. "Headquarters for the 6,000-member Fundamentalist Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints, Colorado City is a kind of company town. "
Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 7,600 - - 2
countries
1998 Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought (Summer 1998); pg. 14. "This adds to a total of about 7,600 people in the Johnson-Jeffs group. " Only in US and Canada
Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 6,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Zoellner, Tom & Greg Burton. "Deliverance Day For One Group Of Polygamists " in Salt Lake Tribune (November 29, 1998). "In recent years, the town has swelled to a population of more than 6,000. "
Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 12,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Associated Press. "Utah polygamists estimated at 25,000 " in Deseret News, Saturday, 24 April 1999. (Viewed online 26 April 1999.) "The following are brief descriptions of the state's prominent polygamist groups, based on information from [Lt. Mike] King and other sources: Corporation of the President of the Fundamentalist Church: Rulon T. Jeffs is the leader of 8,000 to 12,000 members. The headquarters are in Sandy, Utah, but the group has a strong presence in the border towns of Hildale, Utah, and Colorado City, Ariz. Those towns, once known as Short Creek, were the site of the last effort to prosecute polygamists in 1953. Public sentiment turned against authorities after newsreels showed children being taken from their mothers and fathers being thrown in jail. "
Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - Second Ward world 1,520 - - - 1998 Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought (Summer 1998); pg. 14-15. These numbers [7,600] include a recent split (amounting to 20 percent of the total) originally led by Marion Hammon & Alma Timpson from the Priesthood Council at Colorado City... group (also called 'Second Ward')... has 150-200 male heads of household. "
fundamentalist Mormon North America 60,000 - - - 1998 "Spotlight on Utah Polygamy " in Washington Post (Aug. 9, 1998); pg. A3. "But polygamy did not go away. It is estimated that there are as many as 30,000 practitioners today in Utah, double that number in North America. " [NOTE: These are NOT members of the LDS Church, which prohibits polygamy.]
fundamentalist Mormon USA 50,000 - - - 1996 Levinger, George. "Group Marriage: Blessing or Burden? " in Contemporary Psychology (1997, Vol. 42, No. 11). [This is a review of Polygamous Families in Contemporary Society by Irwin Altman and Joseph Ginat (1996)]; pg. 971. "Despite the official prohibition of polygamy in [the] U.S... & by the Mormon Church itself, there are presently, according to the authors, somewhere between 20,000 & 50,000 fundamentalist Mormons who live either in small clusters or in several larger communities that openly tolerate... polygyny. "
fundamentalist Mormon USA - West 30,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Wolfson, Hannah (AP). "Christian Polygamy Takes Root in Utah " in Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, July 24, 1999. (viewed online 24 July 1999). "...estimated 25,000-35,000 polygamists living in the West who trace their roots to historical Mormonism... " [NOTE: These are not members of the mainstream Mormon denomination, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which forbids the practice.]
fundamentalist Mormon Utah 30,000 - - - 1998 "Spotlight on Utah Polygamy " in Washington Post (Aug. 9, 1998); pg. A3. "But polygamy did not go away. It is estimated that there are as many as 30,000 practitioners today in Utah, double that number in North America. " [NOTE: These are NOT members of the LDS Church, which prohibits polygamy.]
fundamentalist Mormon world 30,000 - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 270. Section on fundamentalist Mormons: "Exactly how many fundamentalists there are is now known, since their operations are generally underground. Melissa Merrill [a member] places the figure at between 20,000 and 30,000. "
fundamentalist Mormon world - - - - 1998 *LINK* "Excerpts of Elder Lance B. Wickman Interview " [Second Quorum of the Seventy, a top LDS Church authority]; Interviewed by Larry Warren, KUTV, Channel 2, Salt Lake City, UT, Sept.4, 1998. "Q. Today, we're hearing about these polygamous groups which count their membership in the thousands and who themselves say quite often that they're practicing fundamentalist Mormon principles. How strongly can you state that this is not what the Mormon Church represents for the past century? A: Polygamy, plural marriage, is not part of the doctrine of this Church. Period! I don't know how to state it more strongly than that. The term 'fundamentalist Mormon,' which is one that seems to be promulgated in the media, is a term without meaning. "
fundamentalist Mormon world 21,000 - - - 1998 Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought (Summer 1998); pg. 6. "Even after accepting higher-end estimates on a group-by-group basis, this study finds 21,000 men, women, and children are Mormon fundamentalists... This does not include members of the LDS church who [simply] accept fundamentalist doctrine... "
fundamentalist Mormon - unaffiliated world 3,000 - - - 1998 Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought (Summer 1998); pg. 22. "Independent fundamentalists estimate their own diverse numbers at two or three thousand. "
Fungwe Zimbabwe - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Furiians world - - - - 1999 *LINK* web page: "Excellent Folklore Comments from other Cyber Friends "; site: "Faerie and Other Wee Folk "; "Copyright 1997-'99. Last update April 1999 " [Information submitted to that site by Frederick (frederick@inetarena.com).] (viewed 2 Oct. 2001); pg. . "I fear you have missed one group of faeries from an obscure group of germanic people known as the Furiians. The fairies themselves are known as the Sylk & the most important & benevolent one of these is the KOPR Sylk. The Copper Sylk is the woodland faerie of pleasure & prosperity [&] the guardian of the Oracle of the Nine Gates. The Furiians themselves hardly have any records left because most were destroyed by the Nazis & the Furiians themselves were almost eliminated as a tribe by Nazis, Bombs, executions, & disease. Only a handful exist & their primary home is the U.S.A. They strongly believe in the Copper Sylk & believe their troubles of the past came when they turned away from this Faerie in the 1930s. The tribe was one of the most elusive groups to track down & even today, one is hard pressed to find more than four or five of them at anyone time. Sometimes refered to as the phantom gypsies, they are not even gypsies, but remnants of Old germanic, teutonic, & Nordic settlers. "
Furiians world - - - - 2000 EMAIL correspondence received by Adherents.com from Frederick Seidl [frederick@inetarena.com], 23 September 2001. "My people are the Furiians... We believe in the Oracle of the Nine Gates and as someone said to have bastardized Gods. We would have impaled some for that during my grandfather's time. The Gates are Fofsk, Miz, Alles Don, Erd, Fyr, Aumma, Kopr Sylk (pronounced Copper Silk), Baum, and Klitau. We combine the Gods and Goddesses of the North and the Christian Gods within our belief but believe that all are one and one is all but separate. (Best example to help you understand, using science, when you have an atom alone, it is an atom, but when you have a lot of atoms together you have an Animal or a Plant or a planet but you don't call them a lot of atoms but give them names of their being. So they are one but also they are many.) So we are a tribe and have separate religious beliefs. "
Furiians world - - - - 2000 EMAIL correspondence received by Adherents.com from Frederick Seidl [frederick@inetarena.com], 23 September 2001. [The only mention we found online about Seidl was this: "The NASW Committee on Peace and Social Justice sponsored a forum on welfare reform in February 1999, with Frederick Seidl as moderator. Speakers included Cynthia Woodside of NASW, Marcia Meyers of Columbia, University, Gregory Arcs of the Urban Institute, Jacqueline Ladd and Ted Steege of the Unitarian Universalist Service and others. "] "My people are the Furiians (pronounced Furyans) and have been classified for years as other or as Rom from the distant Lowara. We are not Gypsies but have many friends that are. We are Gaje to them as they are Vorlicht to us. In the old days we would trade horses with them. We never have written our history and customs, in fact my generation is the first one to have the most skill in the writing endeavor. "
Furiians world - - - - 2000 EMAIL correspondence received by Adherents.com from Frederick Seidl [frederick@inetarena.com], 25 September 2001. "[Response to Adherents.com's inquiry if Seidl was saying our 'Roma - Lowara' data was incorrect.] No, we are not saying that the listing of the "Roma - Lowara " is in error. We are saying are people, the Furiians have been misrepresented in the past and have often been mistaken for Lowara. Many of my people were taken to Treblinka and Dachau during World War II and what little writings we had died with the old ones. There has been some work done recently by some cultural anthropologists from a university (I believe it was Duke) in eastern United States. I have only been able to find a few references to us on the Internet. They said are people might be Polobrian (I do not know what they meant, we have always been Furiians) but my people do not speak to outsiders, except recently because many of the young are leaving the tribe and entering into your world. Many do not even honor or respect our people and have shamed themselves. "
Furiians world - - - - 2001 *LINK* web site: "The Coppy Sylk " (home page); Circa 2001. [Site no longer online whenchecked 2 Oct. 2001.] "COPPER SYLK

The Oracle of the Nine Gates. The Copper Sylk welcomes you to her garden... The Copper Sylk's first message, to the Furiians, from the Oracle of the Nine Gates. What is the Copper Sylk, you ask? Well, the Copper Sylk, according to Furiian Legend, is a guiding spirit of pleasure and fortune. She will lead you to fortunes, pleasures, and adventures, but its up to you to make the journey. She makes no judgements upon you except to wish you the best and you decided what is proper for you and your tribal members.?Remember, though Respect of the Gift giver should be honored appropriately... The Copper Sylk shows The Way of Golden Fortunes that pay. Or perhaps you seek... Pleasures and comforts that delight, whether they're wanted by day or needed at night... The Oracles of the Nine Gates bid the wizened members entry... "

Fuso-kyo Japan - - - - 1882 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 32. "Fuso-kyo: One of the 13 groups of sect Shinto (Kyoba Shinto). Fuso is a name for Japan. The original inspiration of Fuso-kyo is said to be Hasegawa, Kakugyo... but the person usually regarded as its founder lived 300 years later. Shishino, Nakaba (1844-1884) began to attract followers devoted to climbing Mt. Fuji in 1875 and his group was recognized as an independent sect in 1882. "
Fuso-kyo Japan - - - - 1921 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 112-113. "Kyoha Shinto: 'Sect Shinto'... In 1921... the official association of Shinto sects had 13 groups... Omoto-kyo which is sometimes listed as one of the 13 came under the auspices of Fuso-kyo... "
Fuso-kyo Japan - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 136. "Sect Shinto consists of a wide range of sects with very different philosophies and practices. 13 are officially recognized... Some sects focus on worship of mountains... Members of Jikko Kyo and Fuso Kyo worship Mount Fuji...; Mitake Kyo centers around the worship of Mount Ontake... "
Ga Ghana - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Ga-Adangme Ghana 1,440,000 8.00% - - 1999 Barnett, Jeanie M. Ghana ( "Major World Nations " book series). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 24-25. "...Ghana's 18 million people... "; pg. 25: "Two other major ethnic groups are the Ewe and the Ga-Adangme... The Ga-Adangme inhabit the coastal region around Accra; they make up about 8% of Ghana's population and speak Ga. "
Gabars Iran 11,000 - - - 1983 Hopfe, Lews M. Religions of the World, Macmillan Publishing Co.: New York (1983) [3rd edition]; pg. 313. "Today the religion... is kept by an insignificant minority (approx. 11,000) in Iran known as Gabars..., by a larger minority (approx. 100,000) in India, and in other small communities around the world totaling approximately 254,000. "
Gabars world 10,000 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 293. "Gabars or Ghebers: The popular name for Zoroastrians residing in Persia in contrast to those known in India as Parsis... A small group of Gabars, perhaps 10,000 survive today. "
Gabars world 30,000 - - 1
country
1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 270. "Gabar. A derogatory term used until modern times, particularly by Muslims, to denote a member of the Zoroastrian community of Iran. Such a person would refer to himself as zartoshti, 'Zoroastrian,' or behdin, 'of the Good Religion.' The Zoroastrians of Iran, numbering fewer than thirty thousand by even the most generous estimates, constitute only about one-tenth of one percent of Iran's population and therefore only a tiny remnant of what was the national religion of that land before Islam. For many centuries they survived in villages in central Iran; in modern times many have migrated to the nearby cities of Yazd and Kitman and from there to Tehran, the capital, where half the Iranian Zoroastrians now live. "
Gabrielino North America - Pacific Coast 5,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Gabrieliņo "; Includes figures for Fernandino, Nicoleno tribal groups.
Gabrielino world 5,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Gabrieliņo "; Includes figures for Fernandino, Nicoleno tribal groups.
Gadaba India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Tribes speaking Munda languages and extending over parts of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, and Orissa include the Santal, Ho, Gadaba, Bondo, and Saora. "
Gagauz Moldova: Gagauzia 137,500 82.50% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Gagauzia " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The Republic of Gagauzia is an autonomous republic of Moldovo. It borders the Republic of Ukraine and the Republic of Moldovo... The number of the population of Gagauzia is 169,300. The Gagauz account for 82.5% of the population (137,500 people). The remaining people are Moldovans, Russians, Bulgarians and Ukrainians. The Gagauz are of the once numerous Oguzian tribes that settled in the southwestern part of Europe in the 11th century. "
Gaiwiio North America - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 250, 252. Chapter on Iroquois, who live in the "United States (New York, Wisconsin); Canada (Quebec, Ontario) "; Pg. 252: "Today some Iroquois remain purely traditional, but the majority are Christian... Handsome Lake (? - 1815) was a Seneca visionary who started a new religion in the early time called Gaiwiio, or 'Good Word.' Followers of Gaiwiio today refer to it as the New Religion. "
Galla Ethiopia - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Galla Kenya - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Galla world - - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; "Ethiopia, Kenya "
Galoa Gabon - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Gandhi veneration India - - - - 1915 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1698. "The Gandhi cult... He is said to have been first saluted as a Mahatma himself by Indian admirers during his civil rights campaign in South Africa, which ended in 1914. but the real bestower of the accolade was the poet Rabindranath Tagore, who was his host on his triumphant return to India. Tagore was referring to him as 'Mahatma Gandhi' early in 1915 and wrote of him in a poem... championed the downtrodden masses. Gandhi did this a great deal more evidently than other Congress figures. His religious ardour and strict personal morals reinforced the cult which grew around him. The masses turned to him as a Mahatma long before they knew him as a politician... "
Gandhi veneration India - - - - 1915 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1698. "After his release from prison, however, Gandhi still had to endure the importunities of hordes of darshan seekers whenever he traveled. Many literally climbed over him, yelling, jostling and clawing. He was often in need of first aid for scratches on his legs. The superstitious credited him with performing miracles, which he could sometimes refute but not always. An English observer noticed his dislike of the cult. Gandhi seldom looked sterner than he did when confronting his worshippers. He tried again and again to replace the popular slogan 'Mahatma Gandhi ki-jai' ('Victory to Mahatma Gandhi') with others of a less personal kind. But his attempts to get rid of his unwanted and, in his own view, undeserved title were doomed to failure. "
Ganesh worship Asia - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 272-273. "Ganesa. Elephant-faced son of Shiva and Parvati, who is worshipped as the overcomer of obstacles at the beginnings of rites or other undertakings... Shrines and temples to Ganesa can be found all over India and his image appears throughout Buddhist Asia as a Buddhist deity. Frequently an image of Ganesa can be found at the doorway to temples of other gods... Over the past seventy years Ganesa's popularity has increased markedly, perhaps because of his association with overcoming obstacles... "
Gaoshan Asia 500,000 - - 2
countries
1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 212, 214. "Gaoshan: Alternate Names: Milin; Sanmei; Liuqiu; Amei; Taiyar; Paiwan; Bunong; Lukai; Beinan; Zou; Saixia; Yamei and Pingpu; Location: China; Taiwan; Population: 500,000; Religion: Traditional beliefs "; Pg. 214: "The Gaoshan have preserved many primitive beliefs and rituals. They believe the spirits are in all things around them and revere a great many gods, such as the gods of the universe, of Heaven, of nature, as well as a variety of spirits and goblins. However, the gods they worship are not the same from one district to the next... "
Gardnerian Wicca United Kingdom - - - - 1955 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1869. "Gardner's followers in the '50s were often referred to as Gardnerian witches; for the last few years they have been increasingly superseded by the 'Alexandrian' variety, whose leader is a Manchester-born man named Alex Sanders... "
Gardnerian Wicca USA 30,000 - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 341. "...the hierarchical structure of the official Gardnerian Witches in America is seen by many Neo-Pagans as anomalous: and this is one reason why the official Gardnerians constitute only about one-tenth of the Neo-Pagan Witchcraft practitioners. "
Gardnerian Wicca world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 73. "[Neo-Pagan] Traditions. Alexandrians - see New Wiccan Church; Dianics - see Circle of Aradia; Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess; Susan B. Anthony Coven #1; Druid - see Ar nDraiocht Fein; Reformed Druids of North America; Gardnerian - see New Wiccan Church; Georgian - see the Georgian Church; Native American - see The Bear Tribe; Caney Indian Spiritual Circle; Sunray Meditation Society "
Gardnerian Wicca world - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Celtic Connection " (by "Herne "); web page: "Various Wiccan Traditions " (viewed 21 March 1999). "retired British civil servant... Gerald B. Gardner is the 'Grandfather'... of almost all Neo-Wicca. He was initiated into a coven of Witches in the New Forest region of England in 1939 by... 'Old Dorothy' Clutterbuck... In 1951 the last of the English laws against Witchcraft were repealed... and Gardner published Witchcraft Today... [was] the first craft tradition in the U.S... Their High Priestess will usually be called 'Lady' Soandso and High Priest, 'Lord Whats-his-name'. (This is far more true in the U. S. than it is in England.) "
Garifuna Belize 16,111 7.00% - - 1998 *LINK* CIA World Factbook 1998 (viewed June 24, 1999) "Population: 230,160 (July 1998 est.)... Ethnic groups: mestizo 44%, Creole 30%, Maya 11%, Garifuna 7%, other 8% "
Garifuna world 500,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 186-187. "Garifuna: Location: Eastern coasts of Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua; United States; Caribbean islands; Population: 200,000 - 500,000 "; "The Garifuna practice a version of Catholicism that incorporates many aspects of their traditional religion, mingling a belief in saints with reverence towards gubida, the spirits of their ancestors, and faith in shamans or 'spirit helpers' (called buwiyes). Their religious practices--which encompass dancing, singing, drumming, and alcohol--have long been considered suspect by established churches and surrounding communities, which have accused them of paganism and devil worship. Some buwiyes have served as Roman Catholic priests or nuns. "
Garner Ted Armstrong Evangelical Association USA - - - - 1995 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance; webpage: "Worldwide Church of God founded by Herbert W. Armstrong " (viewed 23 April 2005) Latest update: 2004-SEP-06; Author: B.A. Robinson "In 1977... Garner Ted Armstrong... founded the Church of God International of Tyler TX... The peak membership of the Church of God International never exceeded about 5,000 members. In 1995, Garner Ted was removed from ministerial responsibilities... He then organized the Garner Ted Armstrong Evangelical Association. In 1998, he founded yet another new church, the Intercontinental Church of God. A new headquarters complex for the Association and the Church was dedicated on 2003-JUN-29 in Tyler, TX. He remained president of both groups at the time of his death on 2003-SEP-15 at the age of 73. "


Garner Ted Armstrong Evangelical Association, continued

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