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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Feminism, USA

Feminism, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Feminism USA - - - - 1912 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 48. "In 1912 Margaret Sanger, founder of the birth control movement in America, was a radical Socialist and militant feminist... Mrs. Sanger, one of eleven children and the mother of three, had personally discarded the Victorian view of marriage, sex, and the family accepted by the vast majority of Americans. Her radicalism stemmed in part from childhood experiences and the challenging new literature on sexual psychology by Sigmund Freud and Havelock Ellis. Sanger was also greatly influenced by the budding science of eugenics. She saw birth control as 'the process of weeding out the unfit' aimed at 'the creation of a superman.' Sanger sought the sterilization of 'genetically inferior races,' singling out Asians in particular, and called for the segregation of 'morons, misfits, and the maladjusted.' "
Feminism USA - - - - 1963 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 189. "The feminist movement was largely a thing of the past in the 1940s and 1950s. Fashionable femininity embraced maternity, humility, and self-sacrifice. But this would change dramatically in the turbulent 1960s, as feminism took on a new life and became known as the 'women's liberation' movement.

A catalyst for this powerful force was Betty Friedan's best-selling book The Feminine Mystique, published in 1963. Friedan, a well-to-do Vassar graduate, thought that housewives were slaves and victims and that the home was a 'comfortable concentration camp.' Self-fulfillment was vital, she argued, and required that women enter businesses and the professions. "

Feminism USA - - - - 1964 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 190. "Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 contained a provision banning job discrimination on the basis of sex. (It was placed there by civil rights opponents in an unsuccessful effort to defeat the legislation.) When the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission refused to enforce it, Friedan created the National Organization of Women. Although membership was small in 1966, NOW members were articulat and zealous. They were soon at work in state capitols, Congress, academia, and business circles demanding greater representation of women in emplyment, equal pay for equal fork, the repeal of antiabortion statutes, easier divorce laws, more day care centers, tougher rape laws, and other reforms. "
Feminism USA - - - - 1969 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 190. "Backed by intellectuals, the major media, and the courts, feminists enjoyed rapid success. Seventeen state legislatures voted to abolish or liberalize abortion laws. 'No-fault' divorce reform began in California in 1969, and within five years forty-five states had enacted such legislation. Feminists also sought the elimination of alimony on the explicity grounds that this would force women out of the home and into the work place where they belonged.

Women's Studies became a respected and popular academic discipline. Hiring goals and quotas were established in both public and private employment to ensure the presence of larger numbers of women. Occupations and professions previously dominated by men opened their doors. The prefix 'Ms.' became common as a substitute for the traditional 'Miss' or 'Mrs.', which identified marital status. "

Feminism USA - - - - 1969 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 190. "Most women in the 1960s were not feminists, let along radical feminists. A Gallup poll published in 1970 revealed that 70 percent of women thought they were treated failry by men. (NOW leader Gloria Steinem, who called housewives 'dependent creatures who are still children,' said they were brainwashed.) Most married women continued to make home and family their top priority, even though 40.4 percent of them held a part-time or full-time job. Many right-wing Christians, men and women, opposed feminism because it rejected the subordinate view of women proclaimed in the Bible. Conservatives of all sorts saw in radical feminism an enemy from the far left. "
Feminism USA - - - - 1971 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 190. "Feminists more radical than Friedan raged against the traditional images of women, calling for an end to beauty contests, refusing to burn bras or makeup or shave their underarms, spurning childbirth, objecting to the traditional family structure, and rejecting their husband's surname. They wanted to avoid, alter, or ban all masculine pronouns, including references to God. 'Sexism' and 'male chauvinism' were seen as the roots of almost every evil. Many radical feminists were proudly lesbian or bisexual.

In 1971, militant feminist Bella Abzug of New York became the second Jewish woman in Congress (Florence Prag Kahn served from 1925 to 1937), working earnestly through three terms to end the Vietnam War and promote feminist and gay issues. "

Feminism world - - - - 1998 Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. "Religion " in The Future Now: Predicting the 21st Century. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1998); pg. 41. "Marxism and Nazism were crude, looking-glass images of religion. Real religion has seen both off. but we still live in societies with worldly priorities, daunting anxieties, susceptibility to charisma and hunger for 'final solutions.' Some secular ideologies already seem to be practising in front of the mirror. Environmentalism sidles into earth-worship. On its sillier edge, feminism erects the mother of all idols and advocates the idiocies of 'Goddess-consciousness'. Mad capitalists celebrate their own millennium... "
Feminism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 63. "Feminism: The movement to obtain equal rights and opportunities for women in Jewish religious life. Following on from the general feminist movement in the 1960s, voices of Jewish men as well as women began to be raised, especially in the USA, that Judaism is too male-oriented. The Jewish woman is at a disadvantage, for example, in matters of divorce and a woman cannot be counted in the quorum required for communal prayer, the minyan. The claims of Jewish feminism in these and similar areas of practice have been acceded to in Reform Judaism and, with some exceptions, in Conservative Judaism. Orthodoxy rejects any departure from the tradition in this area, although some Orthodox Rabbis see no objection to women coming together for services conducted by them in a separate women's minyan. "
Feohi'anga Tokaikola Tonga - - - - 1989 Douglas, Norman & Ngaire Douglas. Tonga: A Guide. Newstead, Brisbane, Australia: Albion Press (1989); pg. 167-168. "Listed here are the main churches & [phone] numbers for confirming the times & locations of services... Anglican Church... Baha'I Faith... Catholic Church... Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints... Church of Tonga... Feohi'anga Tokaikola... Free Wesleyan Church... Free Church of Tonga... Seventh-Day Adventist... Tonga Gospel Fellowship... United Pentecostal Church... Worldwide Church of God. "
Fiji Baptist Convention Fiji 750 - 14
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Filipino Assemblies of the First Born California - - 15
units
- 1969 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 248. "Membership: Not reported. In 1969 there were 15 churches in California and 17 in Hawaii. "
Filipino Assemblies of the First Born Hawaii - - 17
units
- 1969 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 248. "Filipino Assemblies of the First Born... Delano, CA... was founded at Stockton, California by the Rev. Julian Barnabe, an immigant to the U.S. The organization took place at a convention which met June 26 to July 4, 1933. Headquarters were established in Fresno and moved to San Francisco in 1942 and to Delano, CA in 1943... Membership: Not reported. In 1969 there were 15 churches in California and 17 in Hawaii. "
Filipino Assemblies of the First Born world - - 32
units
1
country
1969 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 248. "Filipino Assemblies of the First Born... Delano, CA... was founded at Stockton, California by the Rev. Julian Barnabe, an immigant to the U.S. The organization took place at a convention which met June 26 to July 4, 1933. Headquarters were established in Fresno and moved to San Francisco in 1942 and to Delano, CA in 1943... Membership: Not reported. In 1969 there were 15 churches in California and 17 in Hawaii. "
Filipino Community Churches Hawaii - - 3
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 190. "Filipino Community Churches. Current address not obtained for this edition. The Filipino Community Churches of Hawaii began when the Rev. N. C. Dizon, a Methodist minister, went to Hawaii after World War I to establish a mission. In 1927 he withdrew from the Methdodist church adn formed the First Filipino Community Church at Honolulu. In 1957 a congregation was added at Wahiawa, and a congregation in Hilo is informally associated. Joseph Dizon became pastor of the headquarters church in Honolulu. Its membership consists almost entirley of Filipino-Americans. Membership: Not reported. "
Findhorn Community United Kingdom: Scotland - - 1
unit
1
country
1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 283. "The Findhorn community in Scotland, founded in 1962, initially gained renown for its success in growing spectacular produce in barren soil. Today it hosts international conferences on subjects including business and entrepreneurship and is famous as a New Age center. "
Findhorn Community world 250 - - - 1985 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Adherents.com] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Findhorn: World (mainly Britain): 250 (1985) "
Findhorn Community world 250 - - - 1985 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 209. "The community membership stabilized in the 1980s at around 250 people. "
Fingo South Africa - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Finnigan USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 75. "Finnigan, Amy Baldwin, 3965 Seven Trees Blvd #204, San Jose, CA 95111... A Celtic-oriented eclectic, mixed group focusing on balancing Goddess and God energies in its members; 'we honor the manifestation of the Goddess and Gods within ourselves, joyously celebrate the seasons, work to develop our magical and psychic powers and commit ourselves to social action.' "
Finnish Baptist Union Finland 654 - 11
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "; [Listed in table as "Finnish Baptist Union (Finnish speaking) "]
Finnish Baptist Union of America North America - - - - 1979 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 265. "Many ethnic Baptist groups swell the total of the fellowship in the United States: Finnish Baptist Union of America, French Baptist Conference, Hungarian Baptist Union, Italian Baptist Association, Polish Baptist Conference in the U.S.A. and Canada; Roumanian Baptist Association and the Czechoslovak Baptist Convention of America. "
Finnish Evangelical Lutheran Church USA 25,000 - 79
units
- 1962 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 145. "The Finnish Evangelical Lutheran Church was the smallest of the uniting bodies, with 25,000 members in 79 congregations " [at the time of merger in 1962, forming the Lutheran Church in America]
Finnish Free Church Finland 13,000 0.26% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Christian Religion With statistics of other religions in Finland "; by Osmo Joronen, 1998 Table: "Churches and religions in Finland "; [based on 86% of pop. = 4,300,000 the total pop. of country is 5 mil.]
Finnish Free Church Finland 13,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Evangelical Church in Finland official web site; web page: "Churches and religions in Finland "; (viewed 5 July 1999). Table: "Churches and religions in Finland "; Listed in table as "Members of Finnish Free Church "
Finnish Orthodox USA - - 4
units
- 1962 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 121. "Finnish Orthodox Church... In 1955 the first attempts to call together Orthodox Finns residing in the U.S. found most already attached to Russian congregations, but a small mission chapel was established in the upper Peninsula of Michigan. It was not able to minister to the 1,300 Orthodox Finns and ceased to exist in 1958. A new plan was implemented in 1962 by Father Denis Ericson of Lansing, Michigan. Using lansing as a base, he travels to four woship stations. Services are in English, but Finnish hymns and customs are preserved. "
Finnish Orthodox USA - - 4
units
- 1962 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 73-74. -
Finno-Ugrian religion world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 7). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 958. "For most people, the music of Sibelius is the only window into the world of Finno-Ugrian religion (a linguistic term meaning a family of languages spoken from Lapland and the Batic in the west to the Urals in the east). In Sibelius's tone-poems, such as 'Pohjola's Daughter', 'The Return of Lemminkainen' and above all 'The Swan of Tuonela', a romantic picture is evoked of dark forests, long nights and mystery. Knowing that the composer drew his inspiration from the Finnish national epic the Kalevala, we might suppose that if we knew this work we should have the key to the Finnish religious mind. In fact, the picutre is more complicated. "
Finno-Ugrian religion world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 7). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 958. "The people who speak the Finno-Ugrian languages belong today to Sweden (most of the Lapps), Finland, Hungary and Russia; they are widely scattered, and have been subject to many different religious influences. In some areas traditional religious beliefs survive only as half-remembered folklore; elsewhere, and particularly farther east, they retain their relevance, perhaps beneath a veneer of Christianity, Islam or Communism. But they have for the most part been superseded. "
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) Arizona 16 0.00% 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 13. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) Arkansas 22 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 18. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) California 51 0.00% 5
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 40. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) Illinois 21 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 17. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) Kansas 373 0.02% 15
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 296. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) Louisiana 3 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 02. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) Missouri 297 0.01% 13
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 229. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) New York 3 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 02. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) Oklahoma 80 0.00% 5
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 64. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) Oregon 11 0.00% 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 09. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) USA 1,200 - 50
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 210-211. "Fire-Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan)... Independence, KS [H.Q.]... Membership: In 198 the church reported 1,200 members, 50 churches.. in the U.S. "
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) USA 889 - 49
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) USA 695 - 49
units
- 1991 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from table's "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan). "
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) USA 1,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); "last updated October 1998 " Table: "Christian Organizations "; "Membership numbers, as supplied by various denominations "; note in table: "Wesleyan "
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) Washington 12 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 10. [Listed as 'Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan).']
Fire Baptized Holiness Church (Wesleyan) world 25,000 - 1,050
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 110. "Fire Baptized Holiness Church... ['Wesleyan' apparently not stated here.] For the first ten years of its existence, this black pentecostal church was a part of the Fire-Baptized Holiness Association of America; the black membership separated in 1908 and in 1922 took its present name... Today more than 25,000 members are reported in 1,050 churches. "
Fire-Baptized Holiness Church of God of the Americas world 1,000 - 1
unit
1
country
1908 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Black Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 274. "Fire-Baptized Holiness Church of God of the Americas... W. E. Fuller (1875-1958), the only black man in attendance at the 1898 organizing conference of the Fire-Baptized Holiness Church, became the leader of almost a thousand black people over the next decade. Feelings of discrimination led to their withdrawal and they organized the Colored Fire-Baptized Holiness Church at Anderson, South Carolina, on May 1, 1908. "
Fire-Baptized Holiness Church of God of the Americas world 2,000 - 59
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 280. "Fire Baptized Holiness Church of God of the Americas: A Negro pentecostal sect, found mainly in South Carolina... It was organized by W. E. Fuller in 1898 at Anderson, S. C... It has 59 churches and 2,000 members. "
Fire-Baptized Holiness Church of God of the Americas world 9,088 - 53
units
- 1968 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 274. "Fire-Baptized Holiness Church of God of the Americas... Membership: Not reported. In 1968 the Church reported 53 churches and 9,088 members. "
First Baptist Church (Dallas) Texas 13,000 - 1
unit
- 1979 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 301. "...First Baptist Church of Dallas, Texas... a congregation in a church with more than 13,000 on its roll... "
First Baptist Church (Hammond, Indiana) Indiana 20,000 - - - 1992 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 363. "The largest of the U.S. Protestant supercongregations (Osling 1992:63) are: First Baptist Church in Hammond, IN (attendance 20,000); Willow Creek Community Church in South Barrington, Illinois (attendance 13,000)... "
First Baptist Church (Hammond, Indiana) Indiana 12,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table, grouped by state, columns for city, state, "size " (avg. weekly attendance), etc. From study finding all U.S. megachurches (congreg. w/ "consistent weekly attendance of at least 2,000 persons "); independent, Jack Hyles pastor.
First Baptist Church (Modesto, CA) California 2,500 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Modesto, CA; pastor Wade Estes. [Listed in table as "First Baptist Church "]
First Church of Wintermute world 100 - 1
unit
7
countries
1999 Email resposne from organization webmaster Dan Harris-Warrick (harrisws@carleton.edu), received 12 Feb. 1999. First Church of Wintermute web site: web site Response to questions sent by Adherents.com: How many members/adherents/followers does your church have? "About 100. I'm not certain exactly. "; How many congregations/groups/meeting units are there? "Just one. We just meet and discuss online, through my bulletins and an unmoderated discussion list. "; In how many countries is your church organized? "We're only *organized* online, but there are members in...let's see now...the US, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, the Czech republic, and possibly some others that I don't know about. "
First Congregational Methodist Church of the U.S.A. USA 7,500 - 100
units
- 1954 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 190. "First Congregational Methodist Church of the U.S.A... Membership: Not reported. In 1954 the Church had 7,500 members in 100 congregations, all in the south. "
First Congregational Methodist Church of the U.S.A. USA 7,500 - 100
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 161. "Organized at Forsyth, Georgia, in 1852, this group claims to be the parent body from which the Congregatinal Methodist Church dissented to form its own organization... about 7,500 members in 100 churches throughout Alabama, Mississipppi, Georgia, Tennessee, Texas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. "
First Congregational Methodist Church of the U.S.A. world 7,500 - 100
units
1
country
1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 161. "Organized at Forsyth, Georgia, in 1852, this group claims to be the parent body from which the Congregatinal Methodist Church dissented to form its own organization... about 7,500 members in 100 churches throughout Alabama, Mississipppi, Georgia, Tennessee, Texas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. "
First Deliverance Church of Atlanta USA - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Deliverance Pentecostals; pg. 256. "First Deliverance Church of Atlanta. Current address not obtained for this edition... was founded in Atlanta in 1956 by the Reverends Lillian G. Fitch and William Fitch, two deliverance evangelists. The church teaches three experiences (justification, sanctification, and baptism of the Holy Spirit), emphasizes healing, and practices tithing. Fasts are an imprtant featureof church life. Occasionally members hold a shut-in fast, when they stay at the church for three days over the weekend. Among distinctive practices is their kneeling in prayer upon entering the church. Congregations headed by licensed ministers are located in Georgia, Florida, Oklahoma, and California. Membership: Not reported. "
First Interdenominational Christian Association USA - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Holiness Pentecostals; pg. 238. "First Interdenominational Christian Association; Calvarly Temple Holiness Church; 1061 Memorial Dr., S.E.; Atlanta, GA 30315; In 1946, the Rev. Watson Sorrow, who had been one of the founders of the Congregational Holiness Church, formed the First Interdenominational Christian Association, centered upon his own congregation, Calvary Temple in Atlanta. The Association is like the Congregational Holiness Church but less definite in doctrie... Membership: Not reported. In the late 1960s, Calvary Temple had 100 members. "
Firstborn Church of Christ Oklahoma - - - - 1914 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2172. "...peyotism... met the opposition of the Department of Indian Affairs at an early date, and the consumption of the drug was prohibited by a number of states... In response... the votaries of peyote saw the necessity of organizing themselves as a recognized Church... A group of Oto registered the Firstborn Church of Christ in 1914 in Oklahoma. "
FISH USA - - - - 1988 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 107. "Consider an organization called FISH [a special purpose group, NOT a religion or denomination], for example... using the acronym for 'Friends in Service Here,' FISH operates in more than 800 locations, mostly through the volunteer work of local church members. "
Five Pecks of Rice Taoism China - - - - 140 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 65. "Chang Tao-ling: also known as Chang Ling, 34-156 CE; founder of wu-tou-mi tao, one of the most important schools of religious Taoism. Toward the middle of the 2nd century Chang Tao-ling practiced as a healer in Szechwan Province, curing the sick by the recitation of magical formulae... His fee... consisted of 5 pecks of rice, so that the school founded by him came to be known as Five-Pecks-of-Rice Taoism. his followers venerted him as a celestial master, a title borne by his descendants to this day. "
Five Pecks of Rice Taoism China - - - - 144 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 420. "Wu-tou-mi tao - Chin., lit. 'Five-Pecks-of-Rice Taoism'; early Taoist school (tao-chiao), founded by Chang Tao-ling between 126 and 144 C.E. in Szechwan in western China. It remained active up to the 15th century... During the T'ang and Sung dynasties, the wu-tou-mi merged with other Taoist movements such as the School of the Magic Jewel and later became absorbed by the Way of Right Unity (cheng-i tao), a movement embracing several schools. "
Five Pecks of Rice Taoism China - - 24
units
- 175 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 744. "The tradition of fully developed Taoist religious movements began in the second century A.D. with the Way of the Great Peace (T'ai-p'ing Tao) and the Way of the Celestial Masters (T'ien-shih Tao), also known as the 'Teaching of the Five Pecks of Rice' (Wu-Tou-Chiao) after a famous tax levied by the organization on its members... The Way of the Celestial Masters organized twenty-four parishes in West China, where they apparently offered political as well as spiritual government. The T'ai-p'ing movement was destroyed when their bid to found a new order was supressed militarily. The Celestial Master sect, on the other hand, went on to become an established religion; abandoning its exclusive claims, it was recognized as a legitimate religious movement by the government in A.D. 215. "
Five Pecks of Rice Taoism China - - - - 190 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Taoism; pg. 182-183. "Church Taoism can be divided into 2 main branches. The 1st, the Way of Right Unity (Cheng-i tao)... begun by Chang Tao-ling (or Chang Ling, AD 34-156)... school he founded. The Five Pecks of Rice School (Wu-tou-me-tao)... also known as the School of the Celestial Masters (T'ien-shih tao), since Chang Ling was venerated as a Celestial Master... In AD 190, the Celestial Masters sect set up its own political state, ruled along military lines by Chang Ling's grandson Chang-lu (2nd century AD), assisted by priestly officials called libationers (chi-chiu). "
Five Pecks of Rice Taoism China - - - - 500 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Taoism; pg. 188. "By the middle of the 1st millennium... The Five Pecks of Rice tradition [School of the Celestial Masters] and the Union of Breaths both began to fade from common practice... "
Five Pecks of Rice Taoism China - - - - 1100 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 745. "Between 1100 and 1400 three developments occurred that have helped shape modern Taoism. The first, the revival of the Celestial Master tradition (also known as Cheng-I [Orthodox One] tradition), based at Lung-hu Shan in Kiangsi Province, began to establish that sect's present position as the arbiter of orthodoxy in Taoism. "


Five Pecks of Rice Taoism, continued

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