Adherents.com Home Page

Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Falun Gong, world

Falun Gong, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Falun Gong world 100,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Falun Dafa [Falun Gong] in North Carolina "; home page (viewed 26 April 1999). "Falun Dafa (Falun Gong)... Chinese exercise of body & mind of a long history and was made public by Master Li Hongzhi in 1992. Since its introduction, it has been rapidly recognized worldwide for its effects on health improvement & stress relief, and more importantly, for its profound teaching that guides practitioners towards higher levels. Today there are more than 100 million practitioners... in Asia, Europe, Australia & North America... Every morning, one can find people practicing Falun Dafa in almost every park in China. In US, there are Falun Dafa groups in almost all major cities & universities. Master Li Hongzhi has held numerous classes in more than 20 cities in China, & has given many public lectures in Singapore, Australia, France, Germany, Sweden, Canada, & America. "
Family Christian Center Indiana 2,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Griffith, Indiana; pastor Steve Munsey.
Family Research Council USA - - - - 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); [Compiled by P-Flag]; pg. 476. List of "Family Values " organizations. "Family Research Council - Lobbies against gay, lesbian, and bisexual, civil rights laws, [abortion], government-funded health care, child care... (Head: Gary Bauer) "
Family Worship Center Louisiana 4,300 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; in Baton Rouge, LA; pastor Don Swaggart.
Family, The Australia - - 6
units
- 1972 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "By 1972, the COG had expanded into Latin America and Europe, and began to pioneer in Japan and the Far East. The first pioneer team arrived in Australia in September of 1972. After establishing a Colony in Sydney, the local membership grew and new Colonies were founded in Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide, Canberra, and Perth within the first year. 'Road teams', mobile teams of disciples, hitchhiked or travelled extensively throughout most regions of the country including Tasmania, and towns such as Darwin, Cairns and Alice Springs, preaching the Gospel. Later, many Australian members became missionaries to Southeast and Far East Asia, and the Indian Subcontinent, as well as other countries around the world. "
Family, The Australia - - 1
unit
- 1972 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "By 1972, the COG had expanded into Latin America and Europe, and began to pioneer in Japan and the Far East. The first pioneer team arrived in Australia in September of 1972. "
Family, The Canada 250 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Interactive Bible " (ultra-conservative Evangelical); web page: "Statistics of Religion in North America " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999); Web page by: Steve Rudd, 33 Highcliffe Ave., Hamilton, Ontario Canada L9A 3L3 Table: "[NRMs] in Canada: Membership numbers "; "Scientologist 700; Hare Krishna 450; Moonies 650; Children of god 250; New age type groups 4100 "
Family, The China 300 - - - 1987 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: 6/18/87 issue of GLOBAL PRAYER DIGEST); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) "PRAY FOR THE 100 CHINESE FAMILIES WHO HAVE JOINED THE CHILDREN OF GOD CULT " (Calculated the 300 adherents figure by multiplying 100 "families " by 3.)
Family, The Germany - - - - 1973 Haskins, James. Religions. Philadelphia and New York: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1973); pg. 117. "Interestingly, the Children of God seem to have found their most fertile ground in Germany... A thriving colony exists in the industrial district of Essen, West Germany. Its members, as in the U.S., ar emostly young people, but unlike American adults, the working-class adults of Essen follow the movement with enormous interest. If they do not join, they give money or goods or moral support. "
Family, The Germany 20 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Die Familie (Kinder Gottes) " in table. Source: REMID.
Family, The Russia 70 - - - 1997 *LINK* Shterin, Marat S. "NEW RELIGIONS, CULTS AND SECTS IN RUSSIA: A CRITIQUE AND BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE PROBLEMS " The Family (the former Children of God) has about 70 members (and, perhaps, 200 foreign missionaries).
Family, The United Kingdom: Britain 290 - - - 1999 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Data from the organization.] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... The Family: Britain: 290 (of whom 140 are full time 'charter members') (1999); World: 10,183 charter members and 2,871 'fellow members' (1999) "
Family, The USA 3,000 - 60
units
- 1972 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 118. "Back in the early 1970s, the Children of God (or COG)... At that time there were some three thousand member of the Children of God scattered in fifty or sixty colonies (they disliked the word communed) throughout the United States. "
Family, The USA - - - - 1975 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 130. "By the mid-1970s virtually all of the Children of God colonies had left America. "
Family, The USA 500 - - - 1980 Long, Robert Emmet (ed.). Religious Cults in America (The Reference Shelf: Volume 66 Number 4), New York: The H. W. Wilson Co. (1994). [Orig. source: Article by J. Gordon Melton. From appendix A of The Cult Experience, Cleveland, OH: The Pilgrim Press (1982)]; pg. 93. "As of 1980, less than 500 members remain in the United States. They also recently changed their name to the Family of Love [from "Children of God "].
Family, The USA 500 - - - 1980 Melton, J. Gordon & Robert L. Moore. The Cult Experience: Responding to the New Religious Pluralism. New York: The Pilgrim Press (1984 [3rd printing; 1st printing 1982]); pg. 146. "As of 1980, less than 500 members remain in the United States. They also recently changed their name to the Family of Love. "
Family, The world 50 - - - 1969 Haskins, James. Religions. Philadelphia and New York: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1973); pg. 116. "In 1969, Berg had a vision of a coming earthquake, and he and his followers, who numbered about fifty, began a period of wandering. "
Family, The world 100 - - - 1969 *LINK* official web site (1998); web page: "Our History " "At the end of 1969, when the group had grown to about 100 members, it was dubbed The Children of God by the news media. By 1972, there were 130 Children of God communities scattered throughout the world. "
Family, The world 150 - - - 1970 Davis, Deborah (Linda Berg) with Bill Davis. The Children of God: The Inside Story. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan (1984); pg. 97. "When we arrived at TSC in Feb. 1970, we numbered only 150. In Sept. 1971, there was considerable change. The Children of God would number 2,000 full-time members, with colonies throughout the U.S. and other parts of the world. "
Family, The world - - - - 1972 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "By 1972, the COG had expanded into Latin America and Europe, and began to pioneer in Japan and the Far East. "
Family, The world - - 130
units
- 1972 *LINK* official web site (1998); web page: "Our History " "At the end of 1969, when the group had grown to about 100 members, it was dubbed The Children of God by the news media. By 1972, there were 130 Children of God communities scattered throughout the world. "
Family, The world - - 200
units
50
countries
1973 Davis, Deborah (Linda Berg) with Bill Davis. The Children of God: The Inside Story. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan (1984); pg. 114. "By Sept. 1973 we had approximately 200 colonies scattered throughout about 50 countries. "
Family, The world - - 60
units
- 1973 Haskins, James. Religions. Philadelphia and New York: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1973); pg. 117. "Although the total membership of the Children of God is only a few thousand, the group boasts some sixty colonies scattered over the United States, Europe, Jerusalem, and even Vietnam; and a few thousand evangelists constantly move from city to city around the world organizing communes. "
Family, The world - - - 74
countries
1978 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 76. [Children of God] "A 1978 issue of itspublication 'New Nation' proclaims their communes are in 'seventy-four countries on every continent.' They are particularly strong in South America, Europe--England, Italy, and Holland--and Australia. "
Family, The world 8,000 - - - 1980 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 76. [Children of God] "The group now claims to have eight thousand full-time disciples who have, according to Berg, made over 2 million converts to Christ. There are over 800 Children of God communes throughout the world.
Family, The world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 164. "Children of God (Christianity). A Fundamentalist movement among young people, with emphasis on imminent judgment and communal living. Founded in the late 1960s by David Berg (Moses David). "
Family, The world 6,000 - - 80
countries
1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 260. "Though their total number probably doesn't exceed 6,000, they are spread through more than 80 countries and very few parts of the world have been unaffected by them. "
Family, The world 25,000 - - - 1993 O'Brien, J. & M. Palmer. The State of Religion Atlas. Simon & Schuster: New York (1993); pg. 35. New Religious Movements map ( "committed adherents "): "Children of God 25,000 " Founded in 1968.
Family, The world 2,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "CHILDREN OF GOD... originating in the late 1960s and subsequently called 'THE FAMILY OF LOVE.' It began as part of the JESUS MOVEMENT in California and was founded by David BERG... Today it is an essentially underground movement with an estimated +/- 2,000 members worldwide. "
Family, The world 9,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: 2/17/95 issue of GLOBAL PRAYER DIGEST); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) "The Family " still has, by its own estimates, 9,000 members in Japan and around the world.
Family, The world 10,183 - - - 1999 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Data from the organization.] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... The Family: Britain: 290 (of whom 140 are full time 'charter members') (1999); World: 10,183 charter members and 2,871 'fellow members' (1999) "
Family, The - full-time Denmark 65 - - - 1994 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "The Family has optimistically (while the group was present in Denmark in 1994) given a number of 65 steadfast members in this country, including (quite many!) children. "
Family, The - full-time Germany, West 500 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. "Another more detailed assessment for West Germany covering many more movements concludes that well over one million people are involved or 'influenced' by new religions, with a 'full-time' membership of 64,200. The estimated full time membership for 12 of these movements is: " [table]; [listed in table as "Children of God "]
Family, The - full-time United Kingdom: Britain 140 - - - 1999 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Data from the organization.] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... The Family: Britain: 290 (of whom 140 are full time 'charter members') (1999); World: 10,183 charter members and 2,871 'fellow members' (1999) "
Family, The - full-time world 2,000 - - - 1971 Davis, Deborah (Linda Berg) with Bill Davis. The Children of God: The Inside Story. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan (1984); pg. 97. "When we arrived at TSC in Feb. 1970, we numbered only 150. In Sept. 1971, there was considerable change. The Children of God would number 2,000 full-time members, with colonies throughout the U.S. and other parts of the world. "
Family, The - full-time world 5,300 - 600
units
70
countries
1976 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 263. "According to Davis & Richardson (1976:321), by mid-1976 the COG claimed approx. 4,500 full-time members (not counting some 800 young children of members), and they had organized into more than 600 colonies in over 70 countries. "
Family, The - full-time world 12,390 - 70
units
- 1988 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (Also called Family of Love, The Family) Current membership estimates from non-COG sources vary from 9,000 to 12,000. The COG claimed 12,390 full time members, including 6,833 children in 1988.
Family, The - full-time world 3,000 - 300
units
50
countries
1998 *LINK* official web site: "The Family Thailand " (1998); web page: "The Family Thailand - Who and How " "Worldwide, there are approximately 3000 full-time adult members, working out of 300 centers, situated in over 50 countries. "
Family, The - full-time world 2,871 - - - 1999 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Data from the organization.] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... The Family: Britain: 290 (of whom 140 are full time 'charter members') (1999); World: 10,183 charter members and 2,871 'fellow members' (1999) "
Fang Cameroon - - - - 1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 70. "In Cameroon the Fang are a small minority, but several have prominent government jobs. "
Fang Equatorial Guinea - 80.00% - - 1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 70. "Today, many Fang hold government, administrative, and academic positions in Equatorial Guinea, where they are the largest ethnic group in the country and make up 80 percent of the population. "
Fang Gabon - 25.00% - - 1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 70. "In Gabon, [the Fang] represent 25 percent of the population, and many hold bureaucratic positions. "
Fang world 1,000,000 - - 3
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 66, 70. "Fang: Population: 1,000,000; Location: Southern Cameroon, eastern Equatorial Guinea, and northern Gabon; Language: Fang, a Bantu language "; Pg. 70: "The original Fang religion was called Bwiti. Its central belief was that some people had special mystical powers that enabled them to do harm to others. To protect themselves from these people, the Fang sought the help of secret societies, who also had special powers, called bieri. In the 1800s, many Fang were converted to Christianity, but belief in these mystical powers and secret societies remains to this day, especially in the rural areas. "
Fanti Ghana - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Farm, The Tennessee 300 - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 399-400. "The Farm has been one of the most successful communes to come into being during the 1960s [until recently]... reorganized in 1983...it's now more of a cooperative village than a commune. From a high of 1500 residents, the pop. has dropped to around 300. "
Farm, The USA 300 - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 399-400. "The Farm has been one of the most successful communes to come into being during the 1960s [until recently]... reorganized in 1983...it's now more of a cooperative village than a commune. From a high of 1500 residents, the pop. has dropped to around 300. "
Farm, The world 300 - 1
unit
1
country
1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 399-400. "The Farm has been one of the most successful communes to come into being during the 1960s [until recently]... reorganized in 1983...it's now more of a cooperative village than a commune. From a high of 1500 residents, the pop. has dropped to around 300. "
Fatah world 15,000 - - - 1986 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986); pg. 14. [A faction of the PLO (Palestinian Liberation Organization), thus a political org. more than a faith group.] "Fatah (Arabic for Conquest) is the largest and principal PLO member org... Estimated strength: 10,000-15,000. "
Father Divine Movement Australia - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Peace Mission Movement... formed around... Father Divine. In previous years there have been churches and congregational meetings held within Australia, but at present there are no active congregations of the Peace Mission Movement. "
Father Divine Movement New York - - 1
unit
- 1930 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1830. "...in 1930 at Sayville on Long Island, New York, Baker took the suggestive title, Father Divine... At Sayville he established the first of his Peace Missions, communities which became known as 'heavens' for those who lived in them. They were organized along co-operative lines, and to them were attached members who were non-resident but who joined the residents for religious services. "
Father Divine Movement New York - - - - 1935 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Peace Mission Movement is an organisation that originated in Sayville, Long Island, New York, in the early 1930s. The Movement was formed around the Teachings of by the Rev. M. J. Divine, better known as Father Divine. "
Father Divine Movement world - - 1
unit
1
country
1930 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1830. "...in 1930 at Sayville on Long Island, New York... Father Divine... established the first of his Peace Missions... "
Father Divine Movement world 20,000,000 - - - 1930 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 220. Chapter on Father Divine Movement: "Many of the newspaper stories, furthermore, were clearly inaccurate. Press reports that the movement numbered 15 to 20 million members represented a figure that was higher than the total African-American population of the U.S. at that time... Nevertheless, by World War II, there were traces of the movement in 25 states, although many of the organizations were short-lived... "
Father Divine Movement world - - - - 1930 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 220. "The peak period for the Father Divine movement came in the 1930s and 1940s. It was during these years that membership reached a maximum, that the movement became national and international in scope, and that Father Divine became a renowned religious leader. The organization remained moderately strong during the 1950s and early 1960s, although the vigor was clearly waning. "
Father Divine Movement world 200,000 - - - 1938 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1831. "It is not easy to assess the numbers who believed in Father Divine when he was on the tide of success in the late 1930s, but there were perhaps hundreds of thousands, almost all Negroes. After the Second World War the movement seemed to have passed its peak, as more militant forms of Negro religion, in particular the Black Muslim movement, displaced the essentially peaceful Father Divine [group]. The movement may have suffered after Divine took a white second wife towards the end of his life... He died in 1965, but the movement continued, although at a less impressive level than formerly. "
Father Divine Movement world - - - 8
countries
1939 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 220. "A limited number of countries were involved--Australia, British West Indies, Canada, Switzerland, England, Germany, and Panama. Today, most of the foreign branches appear to be either inactive or defunct. The hub of the movement was always New York, New Jersey, and Philadelphia. "
Father Divine Movement world 200,000 - 160
units
- 1940 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 102-103. "George Barker... He spent his apprenticeship with a variety of black evangelists, and then in 1930 was 'reborn' as God, or Father Divine... His flock grew during the Great Depression, and at its height may have numbered over 200,000. There were about 160 of the group's Peace Missions scattered throughout the country. "
Father Divine Movement world 30,000 - - - 1940 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 220-221. "The peak period for the Father Divine movement came in the 1930s and 1940s... If the hangers-on and the spectators are excluded, it is doubtful whether the figure even ran to the hundreds of thousands. Memership probably could be counted in the tens of thousands, but only at the height of the movement. "
Father Divine Movement world 22,000,000 - - - 1940 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 220-221. "The peak period for the Father Divine movement came in the 1930s and 1940s... How large was the membership during the peak period? No one can say for sure. the number never approached the 22 million repeatedly claimed by Father Divine or the 'millions' regularly headlined if the press. If the hangers-on and the spectators are excluded, it is doubtful whether the figure even ran to the hundreds of thousands. Memership probably could be counted in the tens of thousands, but only at the height of the movement. "
Father Divine Movement world 300 - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 220-221. "Today the number of followers appears to be quite small, perhaps a few hundred dedicated believers, perhaps less. "
Father Divine Movement world - - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 220. "The organization remained moderately strong during the 1950s and early 1960s, although the vigor was clearly waning. After 1965, however--the year of Father's death--the movement seemed to go downhill rather sharply. Today the organization survives, reduced in both numbers and energy. "
Fatimid Islam Africa - North - - - - 909 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 254. "Fatimid. Ismaili dynasty (A.D. 909-1171) which ruled in North Africa and later in Egypt after the decline of Abbasid power. The dynasty, which takes its name from Fatima, the daughter of Muhammad, or perhaps from al-Husayn's daughter Fatima, was founded by a certain 'Ubayd Allah (d. 933), who claimed to be the Mahdi... Fatima played a distinctly esoteric role in Isma'iliyya, linking the Fatimid caliphs to Shi'ite esotericism. This created a dynamic social and intellectual movement that led to the establishment of the Fatimids as a Shi'ite caliphate under a legitimate 'Commander of the Faithful,' and providing a position of leadership for the entire Islamic world. "
Fatimid Islam world - - - - 909 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 636. "Dissemination of the Sab'iyya [Sevener] doctrines in different parts of the Muslim world resulted in the appearance of the revolutionary governments of the Qarmatians, Fatimids, Assassins, and other Ismaili groups. "
Federation of Evangelical Baptist Churches France 6,489 - 111
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Federation of Independent Evangelist Churches of Spain Spain - - - - 1975 Keefe, Eugene K., et al. Area Handbook for Spain (1st Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975); pg. 132. "...a number of Protestant groups in the mid-1970s. Among these were the Church of England; the Evangelicals & associated groups; the Baptist churches, composed of the Baptist Evangelist Spanish Union and the Federation of Independent Evangelist Churches of Spain... All groups were concentrated in Madrid and on the periphery--Catalonia, Galicia, Andalusia, and Valencia. "


Federation of Independent Evangelist Churches of Spain, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.