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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Evangelical, New Mexico

Evangelical, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Evangelical New York - 1.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]
Evangelical Nigeria - 6.86% - - 1988 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: 3/11/88 issue of GLOBAL PRAYER DIGEST); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Official statistics indicate that Nigeria's population is currently 39% Muslim while it is 49% Christian. Less than one-fifth of the population exclusively adheres to traditional tribal religions... Evangelicals are 14% of Nigeria's Christian pop.
Evangelical North America - 27.90% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table. "Affiliated Evangelical "
Evangelical North America - - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long circa 1998. "Evangelicals (those who are part of mainline traditional Evangelical denominations) are growing at 1.12%, adding 202,000 through conversion and 822,000 through births yearly. "
Evangelical North Carolina - 0.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]; Actual % between 0 and 0.5%, so sell was left blank.
Evangelical North Dakota - 0.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]; Actual % between 0 and 0.5%, so sell was left blank.
Evangelical Oceania - 15.80% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table. Location listed in table as 'Pacific'. "Affiliated Evangelical "
Evangelical Ohio - 1.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]
Evangelical Oklahoma - 1.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]
Evangelical Oregon - 1.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]
Evangelical Pakistan 30,921 - - - 1992 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: February, 1992 issue of GLOBAL PRAYER DIGEST); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: (1984 estimate) 96,628,000. Those who call themselves Christians make up 1.6% of the population, 2% of whom are evangelicals. There are 44 different Protestant denominations represented in the country.
Evangelical Pennsylvania - 1.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]
Evangelical Peru 1,720,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Evangelical Peru 729,000 3.00% - - 1998 Holligan de Diaz-Limaco, Jane. Peru: A Guide to the People, Politics and Culture (In Focus series), Brooklyn, New York: Interlink Books (1998); pg. 93. "Population: 22.6 million (1993 census); estimated population in 1996: 24.3 million... Religion: Roman Catholic: 89%; Evangelical: 3%; other Christian: 2%. "
Evangelical Peru 1,500,000 - - - 1998 Holligan de Diaz-Limaco, Jane. Peru: A Guide to the People, Politics and Culture (In Focus series), Brooklyn, New York: Interlink Books (1998); pg. 73. "...the greatest threat to the [Catholic] church's traditional influence has been the spreading of evangelical Protestant groups in Peru. In many rural villages, while the Catholic church is left padlocked, the Jehovah's Witnesses or Mormons, Adventists, or another Protestant group has set up a prayer group and a meeting house... There are now estimated to be around 1.5 million members of evangelical churches in Peru... "
Evangelical Philippines - 3.00% - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD (orig. source: 1979) by P. J. Johnstone); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 45,000,000. Protestants 5% Community 1,500,000. Denominations 70. Evangelicals 3%. Growth of Protestants -- very small overall until 1970s.
Evangelical Philippines 3,566,022 5.10% - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "SEND in Philippines " (SEND International, an Evangelical missionary org.); (Dec. 1998) "Population - 69,922,000 (1995); People - Malayo-Indonesian Filipino; 95% Religion - Traditional Catholic, Muslim, Evangelical; Evangelical - 5.1% "
Evangelical Poland 59,048 0.15% - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "SEND in North Central Europe " (SEND International, an Evangelical missionary org.); (Dec. 1998) "Population - Poland: 39,365,000; Czech Rep: 10,391,000; Slovakia: 5,334,000... Religion - Poland: Traditional Catholic; Czech Rep: Christian; Slovakia: Christian; Evangelical - Poland: .15%; Czech Rep and Slovakia: 1.5% "
Evangelical Rhode Island - 0.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]; Actual % between 0 and 0.5%, so sell was left blank.
Evangelical Russia 3,000,000 - - - 1972 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1972); pg. 15. "Russia... has scores of sects operating at the edges of the Russian Orthodox Church. At their side are numbers of small Protestant groups... the only well-known remaining Protestant groups are Russian Baptists. Some are evangelicals of native growth and some are the result of earlier formal missionary enterprises. Religious yearbooks give the number of these evangelicals as around 3,000,000, but it is difficult to get accurate statistics... "
Evangelical Russia 860,418 0.56% - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "SEND in Russia and Ukraine " (SEND International, an Evangelical missionary org.); (Dec. 1998) "Population - Russia: 153,646,000; Ukraine: 53,770,000 (1995)... Religion - Russia: Secular, Christian, Muslim; Ukraine: Secular, Traditional Orthodox; Evangelical - Russia: .56%, Ukraine: 2.74% "
Evangelical Rwanda - 13.00% - - 1993 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: Nov. `93 CHURCH AROUND THE WORLD); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total pop.: 4,400,000. Protestants 18%. Community 660,000. Denominations 6 - almost all evangelical in theology, though the largest is the S.D.A. Church. Evangelicals 13%.
Evangelical Senegal - 0.05% - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD, A Handbook for World Intercession, by P.J. Johnstone. (orig. source: 1979?)); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Protestants 0.1%. Community 2,400. Membership 450. Most of believers in Assemblies of God, some in WEC [Worldwide Evangelisation for Christ] related Evangelical Church and few in several other groups. Evangelicals 0.05%
Evangelical Slovakia 80,010 1.50% - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "SEND in North Central Europe " (SEND International, an Evangelical missionary org.); (Dec. 1998) "Population - Poland: 39,365,000; Czech Rep: 10,391,000; Slovakia: 5,334,000... Religion - Poland: Traditional Catholic; Czech Rep: Christian; Slovakia: Christian; Evangelical - Poland: .15%; Czech Rep and Slovakia: 1.5% "
Evangelical South Africa - 14.00% - - 1978 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD by P. J. Johnstone; STL Publications, P. O. Box 48, Bromley, Kent, England. Published in 1978.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 26,100,000. Protestants 43% - 80% of the Coloureds, 73% of the Whites, 32% of the Blacks. Community approx. 7,800,000. Denominations 70+. Conservative Evangelicals 14%.
Evangelical South Carolina - 0.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]; Actual % between 0 and 0.5%, so sell was left blank.
Evangelical South Dakota - 0.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]; Actual % between 0 and 0.5%, so sell was left blank.
Evangelical Spain 316,474 0.79% - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "SEND in Spain " (SEND International, an Evangelical missionary org.); (Dec. 1998) "Population - 40,060,000 (1995)... Religion - Traditional Catholic, Secular Evangelical - .79% "
Evangelical Suriname - 2.50% - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD, 1979); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) other evangelical groups (7) 400 Community. Evangelicals 2.5%.
Evangelical Taiwan 496,812 2.31% - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "SEND in Taiwan " (SEND International, an Evangelical missionary org.); (Dec. 1998) "Population - 21,507,000 (1995); People - Han Chinese 97.8%; Religion - Chinese folk religion, Secular, Christian; Evangelical - 2.31% "
Evangelical Tanzania - 9.00% - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD, 1979); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 15,600,000. African Traditionals 28%; Muslims 26%; Roman Catholics 31%. Protestants 14%. Community 1,800,000. Evangelicals 9%.
Evangelical Tennessee - 0.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]; Actual % between 0 and 0.5%, so sell was left blank.
Evangelical Texas - 0.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Listed in table: "Evangelical " [Refers to people who self-identified specifically as "Evangelical, " rather than supplying a particular denomination.]; Actual % between 0 and 0.5%, so sell was left blank.
Evangelical Thailand - 0.20% - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD 1979); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 43,300,000. Protestants 0.4%. Community 130,000. Membership 45,000+. Denominations 17. Evangelicals 0.2%.
Evangelical Trinidad and Tobago - 6.00% - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD 1979); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 1,100,000. Hindus 23%, Muslims 8%, Roman Catholics 38%, Protestants 30%. Protestant Community 253,000. Denominations 16. Evangelical 6%.
Evangelical Turkey 50 - - - 1968 "In Search of the Lost Churches of Paul " in Christianity Today (Aug. 10, 1998); pg. 46-48. "...it is a vast improvement over the number of converts 30 years ago when there was only a handful of evangelical Christians (some estimates put it between 10 and 50). "
Evangelical Turkey 750 - - - 1998 "In Search of the Lost Churches of Paul " in Christianity Today (Aug. 10, 1998); pg. 46. "The number of 'evangelical' Christians is even harder to calculate. Roger Maldsted, who has worked in Turkey since 1964, estimates that there have been about 750 Turkish converts to Christ in the 30 plus years he has been there. "
Evangelical Uganda - 18.00% - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD `79); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 11,900,000. Protestants 26%. Community 1,800,000. Denominations 12, but all Anglicans made illegal in 1977. Evangelicals 18%.
Evangelical Ukraine 1,473,298 2.74% - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "SEND in Russia and Ukraine " (SEND International, an Evangelical missionary org.); (Dec. 1998) "Population - Russia: 153,646,000; Ukraine: 53,770,000 (1995)... Religion - Russia: Secular, Christian, Muslim; Ukraine: Secular, Traditional Orthodox; Evangelical - Russia: .56%, Ukraine: 2.74% "
Evangelical United Kingdom - - - - 1740 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 243. "Evangelicals. The term 'evangelical' has a long history... In the eighteenth century the term came to be applied to those who favored a Protestant Church of England and to their supporters among the Noncomformists... Early eighteenth century British evangelicalism was led by such people as George Whitefield... and Selina, Countess of Huntingdon... "
Evangelical United Kingdom: England - - - - 1846 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 243-244. "Evangelicals. The term 'evangelical' has a long history... In 1846 opponents of the Anglo-Catholic movement in England formed a cooperative venture, the Evangelical Alliance. The Alliance affirmed a nine-point statement of faith... "
Evangelical USA - - - - 1838 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 243-244. "Evangelicals. The term 'evangelical' has a long history... In nineteenth century America the term 'evangelical' was applied to those churches which used techniques of revivalism. These churches were believed to have more in common with each other than with other denominations, and their leaders hoped that an evangelical united front would help make America a Christian nation. In 1838 Samual Schmucker, professor at Gettysburg Theological Seminary, published his Fraternal Appeal to the American Churches in which he argued for a federation of American churches. "
Evangelical USA - - - - 1910 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 243-244. "Evangelicals. The term 'evangelical' has a long history... The sense of unity that had been developing among evangelicals in the early part of the century was broken by the impact of Darwinism, higher criticism, and industrialization. Members of the evangelical churches developed different responses to these problems, and the classical movement split into liberal, conservative and social gospel parties. Although the term 'evangelical' did not disappear from American church life, it was used less frequently as othe rlanguage became mroe descriptive of ecclesiastical alignments. "
Evangelical USA - - - - 1947 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 243-244. "Evangelicals. The term 'evangelical' has a long history... In the 1940s a new evangelical movement began to form as American Fundamentalism developed a prgoressive wing that was more open to the world and church tradition than the older movement. Carl F. H. Henry, a Baptist clergyman and educator, signaled the beginning of this neo-evangelicalism with his Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism (1947). E. J. Carnell (1919-67) was the early theologian of this new type of conservative faith. At the same time that fundamentalist theology was maturing, conservative churches in America entered into a period of growth that is still continuing. The strength of the evangelical movement in the local churches in turn contributed to a strengthening of extracongregational institutions. Such evangelical seminaries as Gordon-Conwell, Fuller, and Trinity now have firmly established reputations as well as growing student bodies. "
Evangelical USA 50,688,000 - - - 1970 Ash, Russell. The Top 10 of Everything 1999. New York: DK Publishing (1998); pg. 76. Table: "Top 10 Fastest-Growing Religious Affiliations in the US "; "Based on increases/decreases between 1970 and 1995 "; Rank: #6; 42.8% growth. Listed in table as 'Evangelical Christians'
Evangelical USA 50,688,000 - - - 1970 Ash, Russell. The Top 10 of Everything, DK Publishing, Inc.: New York (1997); pg. 160-161. List: "Fastest Growing Religious Affiliations in the US " (Based on increase/decrease in membership between 1970 and 1995).
Evangelical USA - - - - 1970 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 243-244. "Evangelicals. The term 'evangelical' has a long history... By 1970 the new evangelical movement had become a major force in American Protestantism. Neo-evangelicals were the fastest growing religious group in the United States. Not only were the local churches continuing to grow, but the intellectual movement associated wih Henry and Carnell was showing considerable vigor. "
Evangelical USA 40,000,000 - - - 1975 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 193-194. "Suddenly, it could be touted that a third of the population regarded themselves as evangelicals. Or by more stringent criteria, such as holding a literal view of the Bible, proselytizing, and having had a born-again experience, about one person in five could be counted as an evangelical. By virtue of the capacity of opinion polling to define aspects of the culture, evangelicals came to be regarded as a force some 30 to 40 million strong. "
Evangelical USA - 20.00% - - 1975 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 193-194. "Suddenly, it could be touted that a third of the population regarded themselves as evangelicals. Or by more stringent criteria, such as holding a literal view of the Bible, proselytizing, and having had a born-again experience, about one person in five could be counted as an evangelical. "
Evangelical USA 30,000,000 - - - 1976 Flake, Carole. Redemptorama Culure, Politics and the New Evangelicalism; Garden City, NY: Anchor Press (1984) ; pg. 3. "1976... Judging by the high percentage of Americans who had defined themselves on his questionnaires as born again, Gallup concluded that there were as many as 50 million evangelical Christians in Ameica, an estimate that far exceeded the more modest self-tally of evangelicals, which was usually put at between 20 to 30 million. (Evangelicals accounted for the discrepancy by pointing out that Gallup's criteria allowed enthusiastic Catholics, Mormons, and assorted high churchers to be included among their numbers.) "
Evangelical USA 50,000,000 - - - 1976 Flake, Carole. Redemptorama Culure, Politics and the New Evangelicalism; Garden City, NY: Anchor Press (1984) ; pg. 3. "1976... Judging by the high percentage of Americans who had defined themselves on his questionnaires as born again, Gallup concluded that there were as many as 50 million evangelical Christians in Ameica, an estimate that far exceeded the more modest self-tally of evangelicals, which was usually put at between 20 to 30 million. (Evangelicals accounted for the discrepancy by pointing out that Gallup's criteria allowed enthusiastic Catholics, Mormons, and assorted high churchers to be included among their numbers.) "
Evangelical USA 30,000,000 - - - 1980 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983); pg. 450. "In general, evangelicals believe in the literal word of the Bible, have had a born-again experience, and are committed to spreading the messge of salvation to others. According to polls taken in 1980, over 30 million Americans qualify as evangelicals (Lipset & Raab, 1981). The evangelical movement is a growing force in many different religious denominations. Nearly 4 million Roman Catholics, for example, are evangelicals. "
Evangelical USA - - - - 1990 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998); pg. 10. "Mark Shibley, a sociologist of religion, was intrigued by data showing that between 1971 and 1990 evangelical churches added more than 6 million members [in the U.S.] while the so-called mainline moderate and liberal Protestant churches lost about 2.6 million members. In the western region of the U.S., evangelical churches have grown at a rate greater than in the traditional southern Bible Belt. "
Evangelical USA 242,000 - - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 15-17. Table 1-2: Self-Described Adherence of U.S. Adult Population 1990. Phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by Graduate School of City U. of New York.
Evangelical USA 40,000,000 - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 278. "Evangelical churches have gained 10 million people in the past ten years. Every five years since 1965 the evangelicals have grown 8 percent, whilemainline Protestants have lost 5 percent. There are nearly 40 million evangelicals in the U.S., according to the National Association of Evangelicals in Washington, D.C. "
Evangelical USA 50,000,000 - - - 1991 Marsden, George M. Understanding Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism. William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company: Grand Rapids, Michigan (1991); pg. 5. "In recent decades, opinion surveys that test for evangelical beliefs typically find somewhere around fifty million Americans who fit the definition. "
Evangelical USA 50,000,000 - - - 1992 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992); pg. 161. "Estimates from other sources have placed the nation's total number of evangelical Christian adults in the 40- t0 50-million range. "
Evangelical USA 47,000,000 - - - 1994 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 219-220. "fundamentalists and evangelical Protestants are not necessarily a monolithic group.... Almost all African-American Protestants seem to be evangelicals... Also included under this umbrella are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons)... contemporary evangelicals can be identified doctrinally by their adherence to some or all of the following beliefs: the Bible as the inerrant work of God, the belief in Christ's divinity, and the truth of Christ's life, death, and resurrection for the salvation of humankind. This loosely knit minority within Christianity in the U.S. numbers an estimated 47 million people. "
Evangelical USA 72,363,000 - - - 1995 Ash, Russell. The Top 10 of Everything 1999. New York: DK Publishing (1998); pg. 76. Table: "Top 10 Fastest-Growing Religious Affiliations in the US "; "Based on increases/decreases between 1970 and 1995 "; Rank: #6; 42.8% growth. Listed in table as 'Evangelical Christians'
Evangelical USA 72,363,000 - - - 1995 Ash, Russell. The Top 10 of Everything, DK Publishing, Inc.: New York (1997); pg. 160-161. List: "Fastest Growing Religious Affiliations in the US " (Based on increase/decrease in membership between 1970 and 1995).
Evangelical USA - 40.00% - - 1996 Gallagher, Winifred. Working on God. New York: Random House (1999). [Orig. source: George H. Gallup, Jr. Religion in America (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton Religion Research Center, 1996).]; pg. xvii. "...evangelical Christians (a small movement until the 1970s, this fervent, creedal, 'born-again' faith is now professed by 40% of Americans. "
Evangelical USA - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 368. "Evangelicals... at least 14 kinds of Evangelicalism have been identified in the U.S., from conservative (including perennial evangelist Billy Graham) to charismatic (typified by Oral Roberts). Some confusion may stem from the fact that Evangelical is often used as a label rather than the name of a denomination. The word appears in the names of some conservative, mainline Protestant churches such as Episcopalian, Lutheran, and Presbyterian, whereas many other churches that consider themselves Evangelical do not use the word at all. "
Evangelical USA 45,000,000 - - - 1997 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997); pg. 282. "It has been estimated that about 45 million American Protestants--communicants of both large denominations and small bodies--are evangelicals. "
Evangelical USA - - - - 1999 *LINK* Banks, Adelle M. "Evangelicals Affirm Unity in New Document " in Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, June 5, 1999 (viewed online 11 June 1999). [Orig. source: Religion News Service] "More than 125 evangelical Christian leaders have endorsed a new document affirming the doctrines of faith on which they agree. Drafters of "The Gospel of Jesus Christ: An Evangelical Celebration "... The document was drafted by a 15-member committee & initially endorsed by an additional 114 people, including a wide range of evangelicals... The endorsers include leaders of numerous evangelical ministries, such as Promise Keepers' Bill McCartney, Campus Crusade's Bill Bright & Prison Fellowship's Chuck Colson. Religious broadcasters such as Jerry Falwell, Pat Robertson... are signatories, along with prominent pastors such as Bill Hybels of Willow Creek Community Church..., Tony Evans of Dallas & D. James Kennedy of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. They also represent Methodist, Baptist, Pentecostal, Anglican & Lutheran denominations, among others. Timothy George, a drafting committee member, said... "When evangelicals themselves are so divided... that's a bad witness for the gospel... "
Evangelical USA - blacks - 77.00% - - 1998 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 397. "According to the Gallup International organization, African Americans... The vast majority of African Americans are evangelical Christians (77 percent), and they constitute 15 percent of America's Protestants. "


Evangelical, continued

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