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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Eco-Spiritualists, world

Eco-Spiritualists, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Ede Vietnam 100,000 0.14% - - 1994 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Vietnam ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1994); pg. 37, 39. Pg. 37: "...Vietnam's 71.8 million people... "; Pg. 39: "Numerous ethnic communities, whom the French collectively called Montagnards (mountian people), populate the Central Highlands. These groups total about one million people... The most numerous are the Jarai (150,000), the Ede (100,000), and the Bahnar (100,000). "
Eden Revival Church Ghana - - - - 1986 Mazrui, Ali A. The Africans: A Triple Heritage. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company (1986); pg. 155. "In Ghana the most notable independent church is the Eden Revival Church founded by its prophet Charles Yebea-Korie in 1963. "
Edo Nigeria - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Eglise Baptiste Camerounaise of the Cameroon Cameroon 50,851 - 142
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Eglise Reformee de France France 334,000 - - - 1972 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1972); pg. 17. "The most important [Protestant denomination] for all of France is the Eglise Reformee de France [with diacriticals: Église Réformée de France], with over a third of a million members. "
Eglises Baptistes Evangelical au Congo, 48th Comm. des Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) 50,000 - 105
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "; [Listed in table as "48th Comm. des Eglises Baptistes Evangelical au Congo "]
Egyptian Baptist Convention Egypt 1,000 - 12
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Ekalesia Kelisiano Tuvalu Tuvalu 9,988 97.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 10,297. Church of Tuvalu [i.e. Ekalesia Kelisiano Tuvalu] (Congregationalist) 97%, Seventh-Day Adventist 1.4%, Baha'i 1%, other 0.6%.
Ekalesia Kelisiano Tuvalu Tuvalu 9,715 94.35% 13
units
- 1997 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Tuvalu/Ekalesia Kelisiano Tuvalu (EKT) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Ekalesia Kelisiano Tuvalu (EKT)... Country information: Population: 10,297 (July 1997).. Main religions: Christianity (95%)... Church information... Members/Congregations: 9,715/13. "
Ekalesia Kelisiano Tuvalu world 9,715 - 13
units
- 1997 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Tuvalu/Ekalesia Kelisiano Tuvalu (EKT) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Ekalesia Kelisiano Tuvalu (EKT)... Church information... Members/Congregations: 9,715/13. "
Ekalesia Nieue Niue 1,281 75.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 1,708. Ekalesia Nieue (Niuean Church) 75% - a Protestant church closely related to the London Missionary Society, Latter-Day Saints 10%, other 15% (mostly Roman Catholic, Jehovah's Witnesses, Seventh-Day Adventist)
Ekavyavaharika Buddhism world - - - - -260 B.C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 129. "The Hinayana enumerates the traditions of 18 schools that developed out of the original community... Between 280 and 240 B.C.E., the Mahasanghika group divided into 6 schools: The Ekavyavaharikas; the Lokottaravadins, who split from them; the Gokulikas, and the Bahushrutiyas, Prajnaptivadins, and Chaitikas, who split from the Gokulikas. "
El Rukn USA 4,000 - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990). [Chapter: The Extreme Left: Louis Farrakhan and Others]; pg. 134. "...El Rukn, 'one of the biggest and most violent black organized-crime syndicates in the country.'

Based in Chicago, El Rukn started as a black street gang in the 1960s, 'shaking down local businesses for protection money.' It received some federal grants, bought businesses and real estate, and then peddled drugs. Calling itself the Black P. Stone Nation, and then El Rukn, gang members 'commit murder without any qualms; they deal heavily in narcosts, prostitution, and other forms of vice... They have an organization structure as rigid as the crime syndicate,' states a 1980 police report.

While claiming to be a religion, El Rukn--now estimated to have four thousand members with a hard-core group of some fifty-individuals--has become increasingly militant and violent and has been terrorizing Chicago for years... "

El Rukn USA - - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990). [Chapter: The Extreme Left: Louis Farrakhan and Others]; pg. 134. "In 1987, five [El Rukn] members were convicted of conspiring with Al-Qaddafi, who had reportedly promised them $2.5 million to bomb buildings and planes and to assassinate American officials. Although many of the leaders are now in jail for forty-five years to life sentences and including two on death row, federal officials believe that the gang is still going strong under leadership coming out from prison. "
El Shaddai Philippines: Pampanga: Guagua 9 0.01% - - 1994 *LINK* web site: Census data for municipality of Guagua in province of Pampanga in Philippines "[Total] population: 95,374 as of September 1995 Census "; Table: "From April 1994 Census of Municipality of Guagua "
Elan Vital Denmark - - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "Corresponding figures, i.e. a dedicated membership of 30 to 150 in Denmark, are found in groups such as Brahma Kumaris, Elan Vital, Soka Gakkai and Sahaj Marg according to their own information. "
Eleusinian Greece - - - - -600 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1925. "Of far greater significance [than Orphism] were the Eleusinian Mysteries. In the small town of Eleusis, between Athens and Megara, ceremonies were held as part of the cult of Demeter. Originally these ceremonies were only for the inhabitants of the town and served to initiate members into the community; a person who had been initiated became a burgess of the town. When Eleusis was annexed by Athens about 600 BC, the nature of the ceremony changed. The person being initated no longer acquired political rights; the ceremony was now purely religious. All Athenians were now entitled to become initiated into Eleusis if they wished to do so; many of them did, and Greeks from other towns began to be initiated into the Mysteries shortly afterwards. "
Eleusinian Greece - - - - -550 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1925. "The Eleusinian Mysteries in this way acquired an 'international' [pan-Greek] character. A person who went to Eleusis to be initiated did so of his own free will and from purely religious motives. The complete development of the Mysteries was only possible because in the city of Athens a rich and highly differentiated culture had evolved which afforded the individual wide latitude for his specific way of life and religious beliefs. "
Eleusinian Greece - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 34. "Much more powerful as a rival to Christianity were the mystery religions that were quite numerous & rapidly spreading during this period. They were syncretistic kinds of faiths that fused Hellenic & Oriental thought. The most important ones were the Dionysian & Orphic mysteries of Thrace; the Eleusinian from Eleusis, near Athens... "
Eleusinian Greece - - - - 50 C.E. Otto, Walter F. (Translated by Robert B. Palmer.) Dionysus: Myth and Cult. Dallas, Texas: Spring Publications (1981 - reissued; English translation first pub. 1965 by Indiana University Press); pg. , pg16. "Many unquestionably old rituals are obviously connected with mythical happenings. In Eleusis the fortunes of Demeter and her daughter are acted out in public in the form of cult celebrations. "
Eleusinian Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 307. "The Greeks called [Mithraism] and other such cults--like those of Eleusis, Dionysus, and Isis--mysteria, from a root meaning literally 'to keep one's mouth shut,' and from which the English words mystery and mysticism are derived. The term mystery applies to a sect capable of conferring initiation on its members. "
Eleusinian world - - - - -300 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1925. "When the East became Hellenized following the conquests of Alexander the Great, the Ptolemies -- the Graeco-Macedonian kings of Egypt -- expanded their capital Alexandria into a new, bigger and more beautiful Athens. One of the suburbs of Alexandria they called Eleusis and there they founded a cult of Demeter with initation ceremonies which had been copied from the Eleusinian rites; the cult was established by Timotheus, one of the Eleusinian caste of priests. As the Greek goddess Demeter was always regarded as the equivalent of the Egyptian goddess Isis, a starting point was provided for the later Graeco-Eastern mysteries. "
Eleusinian world - - - - -300 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1925, 1928. "During the Imperial period the Dionysiac Mysteries were a religion of the same type as the other Mystery religions. There were Dionysiac mystics in all towns, but Eleusinian initiations were held only in Eleusis and Alexandria. "
Elf Lore Family USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 75. "Elf Lore Family, Terry Whitefeather, P.O. Box 1082, Bloomington, IN 47202. An ecological folklore group; practices open-minded interaction among all species; holds festivals in Lothlorin, a land sanctuary; and publishes Wild Magic Bulletin... "
Elim Fellowship Canada - - 20
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 247. Church reporting.
Elim Fellowship Denmark 5,000 - 52
units
- 1998 *LINK* DAWN Fridayfax 1998 #18: "Denmark: What God brings together "; Source: Hans-Erick Friberg. Tel (+45)-7557 2707. Email: hefleika@post9.tele.dk "The Apostolic Church has around 2,500 members in 40 churches, the Pentecostal movement (Elim) around 5,000 in 52 churches. "
Elim Fellowship New Zealand 2,157 0.07% - - 1986 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); web page: Pentecostal groups (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Listed in table as "Elim "
Elim Fellowship New Zealand 2,355 0.07% - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); web page: Pentecostal groups (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Listed in table as "Elim "
Elim Fellowship New Zealand 3,015 0.08% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); web page: Pentecostal groups (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Listed in table as "Elim "
Elim Fellowship North America 18,000 - 125
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 189. "Some 18,000 members are found in 125 churches. "
Elim Fellowship North America 20,000 - 180
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). -
Elim Fellowship United Kingdom 45,000 - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 133. "In the UK, for example, the Assemblies of God numbers 70,000 members, Elim Pentecostal Church 45,000.
Elim Fellowship USA 20,000 - 200
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 247. Church reporting.
Elim Fellowship USA 20,000 - 177
units
- 1990 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from table's "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Elim Fellowship. "
Elim Fellowship USA 21,038 - 170
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
Elim Fellowship USA - - 90
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Elim Fellowship
Elim Fellowship world - - 5,500
units
11
countries
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 247. Church reporting.
Elmbrook Church Wisconsin 5,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table, grouped by state, columns for city, state, "size " (avg. weekly attendance), etc. From study finding all U.S. megachurches (congreg. w/ "consistent weekly attendance of at least 2,000 persons "); an independent in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, pastor Stuart Briscoe.
Embu Kenya 265,700 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 143. "Embu: Location: Embu in the Eastern Province of Kenya; Population: About 265,700; Religion: Christianity; indigenous Embu religion " [NOTE: This statistic is a measure of tribal/ethnic affiliation, not a count of how many practice traditional Embu religion.]
Emin Foundation United Kingdom: Britain 700 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Listed in table of NRMs.
Emissary Foundation International world - - 212
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 399. "The Emissary Foundation International was founded in Tennessee in 1932 by Lloyd Arthur Meeker... operates a dozen large communities and an outreach of nearly 200 centers on six continents. "
Emmanuel Association North America 400 - 17
units
- 1970 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 210. "Emmanuel Association... Colorado Springs, CO [H.Q.]... formed in 1937 by Ralph G. Finch, a former general superintendent of Foreign Misions of the Pilgrim Holiness Church, not aa constituent part of the Wesleyan Church... Membership: Not reported. In 1970 there were 17 churchs in the U.S. and Canada and an estimated membership of 400. " [NOTE: This body has is distinct from, and has a distinct encyclopedia entry from the Emmanuel Holiness Church.]
Emmanuel Faith Evangelical Church California 3,914 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Escondido, CA; pastor Richard Strauss.
Emmanuel Holiness Church world - - 72
units
- 1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Holiness Pentecostals; pg. 238. Church reporting.
Emmanuel Holiness Church world 1,200 - 56
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 190. "Emmanuel Holiness Church... They now have 1,200 members in 56 churches and tabernacles in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North and South Carolina, and Illinois; there is missionary activity in Mexicio, Egypt, and France. "
Emmanuel's Fellowship Pennsylvania 15 - 1
unit
- 1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Brethren; pg. 316. "Emmanuel's Fellowship was formed in 1966 by membres of the Old Order River Brethren, under the leadership of Paul Goodling of Greencastle, Pennsylvania. Grooding rejected the Brethren's insistence on baptism by immersion and their allowing members to accept social security benefits. The Fellowship baptized by pouring, as the candidate stands in water. There are very strict dress requirements. Membership: Not reported. In 1967 there was one congregation of 15 members. "
Emmanuel's Fellowship world 15 - 1
unit
1
country
1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 316. "Emmanuel's Fellowship... In 1967 there was one congregation of 15 members. "
Encuentro Menonita Espanol Spain 120 - 3
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Europe: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " SPAIN: Encuentro Menonita Espanol; Members: 120; Congregations: 3
End Time Ministries (Mead) Florida: Lake City 2,000 - - - 1999 Posted to Nurel-l newslist by Roger E. Olson, 1 Jan. 1999. "Q. I'm seeking info. about [a group] known variously as 'The Assembly,' 'The Body,' & 'End-Times Ministry' & has a H.Q. in Lakeland, Florida... Answer: The Charles Mead End Time Ministries of Lake City, Florida has no connection with Sam Fife or Buddy Cobb who founded a group that had similar names & some similar beliefs. Apparently, Charles Mead... originally had some connection with the late Hobart Freeman & his 'Glory Barn' in Indiana. He came to Sioux Falls, S.D. in the mid-70s when I was there & a house church known as 'The Assembly' & 'The Body' led by Gary Cooke & Mike Cady adopted him as their prophet & apostle. Other local assemblies sprung up around the upper Midwest. In the 1980s many & perhaps most of Mead's followers moved to Lake City, FL where about 1,500 to 2,000 of them live around Mead's residence in the suburbs. They are known by locals as 'E.T.s' (End Timers) "
Endtime Ministries (Body of Christ) world 10,000 - 25
units
- 1979 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Latter Rain Pentecostals; pg. 284. "Endtime Body-Christian Ministries, Inc.
Miami, FL

The Endtime Body-Christian Ministries Inc. (a.k.a. the Body of Christ Movement and Marantha Christian Ministries) was founded in the early 1960s by SamFife (d. 1979). A former Baptist minister, Fife became a Pentecostal... he organized a series of communal farms in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America... Membership: Not reported. Ther were reported to be between 6,000 and 10,000 members at the time of Fife's death. Approximately 25 communal farms had been established. "

Endtime Ministries (Body of Christ) world 10,000 - 24
units
4
countries
1980 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 73. [founded by Sam Fife; also known as "The End Time Ministry, " "The Movement, " and "The Body "] "Today there are seven to ten thousand members in two dozen communes they call 'wilderness farms' located in [USA], British Colombia..., Guatemala, and Peru. "
Enenga Gabon - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
English Baptists Netherlands - - 1
unit
- 1608 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 90. "John Smyth (ca. 1554-1612), who gathered a congregation in Gainsborough, England and moved it to Amsterdamin 1608 to find religious liberty, is generally regarded as the first English Baptist. It was while his congregation was in Holland, however, that the practice of baptizing only adults began. "
English Baptists world 20,000 - - - 1660 Stuber, Stanley I. How We Got Our Denominations: A Primer on Church History. New York: Association Press Revised Ed., 1959); pg. 125-126. "As a denomination, the English Baptist date from 1611 when a group of John Smyth's congregation, while still in Holland, broke relations with the Independents and returned to England... Although severely persecuted they claimed to have 20,000 members in 1660. "
Ennokyo Japan 306,975 0.27% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as "other " new religion (neither Shinto nor Buddhist); origin year: 1919.
Enterprise Baptist Indiana 71 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 56. [Listed as 'Enterprise Baptist.']
Enterprise Baptist Kentucky 3,590 0.10% 35
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 2,846. [Listed as 'Enterprise Baptist.']
Enterprise Baptist Ohio 2,340 0.02% 34
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 1,864. [Listed as 'Enterprise Baptist.']
Enterprise Baptist USA 6,001 - 70
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Enterprise Baptist.']
environmentalism Iceland - - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 203. "An Icelandic company, which continued whaling in defiance of the ban, had its critical computer room mysteriously trashed and two whaling ships sunk in Reykjavik harbor, all on the same day. (The emerging eco-tribes have powers to pass laws and enforce them.) As it turned out, Greenpeace's hands were clean; it was another group, acting on its own initiative, that wreaked havoc in Reykjavik. "
environmentalism world - - - - 1992 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 204. "In the age of Everything-Everythwere, eco-organizations are no longer insular but act in concert in a global orchestration. They showed unity of purpose in 1992 in Rio de Janeiro when the UN-sponsored Earth Summit evolved into the largest international conference ever held. For nearly two weeks, it attracted 35,000 people, among them 17,000 delegates, 10,000 representatives of private organizations, 8,000 journalists. The significance of the Earth Summit is not that any issues were resolved, but more importantly, that all of the splintered bands of eco-warriors and interest groups were able to come together. This movement is steadily growing and will, in time, expand into a formidable eco-tribe able to wield powerful influence in the twenty-first century. "
environmentalism world - - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 202. "The National Wildlife Federation's directory displays over 2,000 conservation groups in the United States alone. Tens of thousands more are scattered like so many stars--some large, some barely visible--across Europe, South America, Africa, Asia, even Antarctica. As we enter the Placeless Society, these 'dots' are forming constellations, each connecting with the other to act toward a common goal. "
environmentalism world - - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 203. "An Icelandic company, which continued whaling in defiance of the ban, had its critical computer room mysteriously trashed and two whaling ships sunk in Reykjavik harbor, all on the same day. (The emerging eco-tribes have powers to pass laws and enforce them.) As it turned out, Greenpeace's hands were clean; it was another group, acting on its own initiative, that wreaked havoc in Reykjavik. But the scuttling of the ships in Iceland points to a trend in the eco-wars ahead... the various eco-tribes will work together, each with its own strength or specialty, yet interconnected, exchanging ideas and personnel on a global basis in a common war against a complex and multifaceted enemy. "
environmentalism world - - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 201-202. "Eco-Tribes. The global tribes we have discussed--the Jews, the Muslims, the Chinese--all relate to placeless memberships that bind a dispersed people. But the 21s century is also bringing a new class of powerful tribes whose membership is pure ideological choice, having little to do with language or birth. The most obvious example is environmentalism. The current wave of environmentalism sweeping the planet is born from our individual experiences: from the parent in Baton Rouge fiercely upset about her son's breathing disorder stemming from the neighborhood incinerator, to the fishermen along the Volga... who can no longer fish--or at times even get near the rancid water... Most people adapt, but others react and join eco-organizations. Starting out small... they have grown from neighborhood fringe groups barely noticed by the press in the 1960s, to powerful global organizations causing industries to tremble and nation-states to cower. "
environmentalism world - - - - 1998 Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. "Religion " in The Future Now: Predicting the 21st Century. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1998); pg. 41. "Marxism and Nazism were crude, looking-glass images of religion. Real religion has seen both off. but we still live in societies with worldly priorities, daunting anxieties, susceptibility to charisma and hunger for 'final solutions.' Some secular ideologies already seem to be practising in front of the mirror. Environmentalism sidles into earth-worship... "


environmentalism, continued

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