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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Doukhobors, Canada

Doukhobors, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Doukhobors Canada - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "DOUKHOBORS... A Russian religious SECT founded in the eighteenth century... Persecuted during the nineteenth century, they emigrated to Canada where small communities still exist. "
Doukhobors Georgia (country) 2,000 - - - 1999 "From: C-afp@clari.net (AFP); Newsgroups: clari.world.europe.russia, clari.world.europe; Dukhobor sect members emigrate to Russia and Canada; Copyright 1999 by Agence France-Presse (via ClariNet); Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 8:17:17 PST; [Posted to Nurel-l newslist by Roger Gonnet, 17 Feb. 1999]; Dateline: "MOSCOW, Jan 27 (AFP) " "More than 4,000 members of the Protestant Dukhobor sect have left Georgia to settle in Russia and Canada in recent years, the Russian daily Segodnia said Wednesday. A group of 60 people is expected to leave Saturday to settle in the Bryansk region of central Russia, leaving only 2,000 Dukhobors in Georgia, the paper said. "
Doukhobors Russia - - - - 1750 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 231. "Dukhobors. Pacifist Russian sect which appeared in the mid-eighteenth century near Kharkov, later moving to the Caucasus. "
Doukhobors Russia 11,000 - - - 1966 Woodcock, George & Ivan Avakumovic. The Doukhobors, Oxford University Press: New York, NY (1968); pg. 17. "...a Canadian leader of the sect visiting in Russia in 1966 was told that there were eleven thousand declared Doukhobors in the country. "
Doukhobors Saskatchewan 7,000 - - - 1899 "From: C-afp@clari.net (AFP); Newsgroups: clari.world.europe.russia, clari.world.europe; Dukhobor sect members emigrate to Russia and Canada; Copyright 1999 by Agence France-Presse (via ClariNet); Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 8:17:17 PST; [Posted to Nurel-l newslist by Roger Gonnet, 17 Feb. 1999]; Dateline: "MOSCOW, Jan 27 (AFP) " "In the two-year period 1898-1899 alone, over 7,000 Dukhobors moved to Saskatchewan and later spread to the western province of British Columbia. "
Doukhobors Soviet Union 11,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 231. "Dukhobors... It is estimated that there are about 50,000 members throughout the world, of which 20,000 are in Canada and 11,000 in the Soviet Union. "
Doukhobors world 50,000 - - - 1968 Woodcock, George & Ivan Avakumovic. The Doukhobors, Oxford University Press: New York, NY (1968); pg. 17. "... this sect... must at present number considerably less than fifty thousand adherents throughout the world. It is unlikely that at any time it was more numerous. "
Doukhobors world 50,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 231. "Dukhobors... It is estimated that there are about 50,000 members throughout the world, of which 20,000 are in Canada and 11,000 in the Soviet Union. Their distrust of outsiders and officials leads them to conceal membership figures... "
Dravidian India - - - - -1500 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 229. "Dravidian. A family of languages spoken throughout Southern India, the main modern representations of which are Tamil, Kannada, Telugu, and Malayalam. By extension, the term also refers to the peoples speaking these languages. Before the Aryan invasion of India around 1500 B.C., the homeland of the proto-Dravidians included Northwest India, and it appears probably that the Indus Valley civilization is attributable to them. "
Dreamers USA - - - - 1850 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 8). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1091. "...the Ghost Dance was foreshadowed by a number of similar movements which had flourished and died throughout the 19th century. Among its forerunners were... the Dreamers founded among the Columbia River tribes west of the Rocky Mountains by Smohalla... "
Druidism Australia 554 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census.
Druidism Europe - - - - 100 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 719. "Members of the priesthood of pre-Roman Celtic religion in Gaul and Britain, the Druids are mentioned by name in some 30 references in Greek and Roman writers between the 2nd century BC and the 4th century AD. In addition, functionaries known as Druids are mentioned in the earliest Celtic literature, that of the Irish hero-tales and law tracts, which can be shown to represent a pre-Christian state of affairs older than the 5th century AD. The religion in which Druids functioned was proscribed and exterminated in the Roman provinces of Gaul and Britain during the 1st century AD. "
Druidism Europe - - - - 100 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 719. "The social and economic background of the Celtic culture to which the Druids belonged can to a fair extent be reconstructed from the evidence of archeology and that of the classicla writers who commented on the Celts, with the vernacular sources, as in the case of Ireland, as supporting evidence. In archeological terms Druids belong to the final phases of the La Tene culture of the late Iron Age. References to Druids, however, relate exclusively to Gaul, except for two mentions of them in Britain, found in Caesar and Tacitus. "
Druidism France - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 723. "The Bretons have a strong Druid and Arthurian tradition from classical and medieval times; there were the famous prophesying 'Druidesses' on the Ile de Seine, and the enchantments of the Forest of Broceliande, near Rennes, where Merlin was imprisoned in a tree by the enchantress Vivien. It was only at the beginning of the present century, however, that Druidry became an organized force in Brittany. For several years now the annual August Eisteddfod has been held beside the beautiful lake at Paimpont, in the midst of the old forest area of Broceliande. "
Druidism Ireland - - - - 450 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 722. "How far was Druidry driven out by the Romans? It continued in Wales and developed the deeply poetic traditions of the 5th and later centuries... It also survived in Ireland. "
Druidism United Kingdom - - - - -1450 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 722. "In modern times, archeologists, Professor R. J. Atkinson in particular, date the successive Stonehenge structures to the period 1900-1450 BC... To... traditional [astronomical] meanings at Stonehenge, one adds the obvious deductions from its structure: circular dancings, processions, five-fold teachings, a death-and-resurrection cult of the sun, and male and female emblems. These signs give a sketch-outline of a cult, remarkably like the Druidic ideas. "
Druidism United Kingdom - - - - -55 B.C.E. King, John. The Celtic Druids' Year: Seasonal Cycles of the Ancient Celts. London, UK: Blandford (1994); pg. 40. "If we suppose, as there seems good evidence for doing so, that Druidism was especially important in the British Isles, then the year 55 BC marks a definite boundary between one phase and the next in our history of Druidic thought and practice. Before then, Druidism flourished in the British Isles free of outside influence, from a beginning lost in the mists of antiquity. After that date, when Caesar sent the first punitive Roman expeditions to discourage the British Celtic missionaries who had been supporting the resistance in Gaul, British Druidism found itself in contact with, and to varying and uncertain degree in conflict with, the ideology of Rome, a contact that was destined to last for 500 years. "
Druidism United Kingdom - - - - -55 B.C.E. King, John. The Celtic Druids' Year: Seasonal Cycles of the Ancient Celts. London, UK: Blandford (1994); pg. 43. "With Caesar's conquest of Gaul begins the second phase of the history of the Celts. Druidism in unconquered Ireland and the furthest reaches of the Scottish highlands and islands remained unaffected by Rome. Brythonic Druidism, in what is now England, Cornwall and Wales (and, subsequently, Brittany) was affected by Roman influence, but to varying degree. Very often, indigenous Celtic gods continued to be worshipped alongside important Roman gods, with little apparent difficulty. "
Druidism United Kingdom - - - - 1245 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 722. "Druid traditions were unwritten until recently and links are widely dispersed in time. It is said that in 1245 a gathering was held with representatives from many parts and the objects of the Order were agreed. A grove or group was founded, the Mount Haemus Grove which still exists. Druids appear, together with Rosicrucians and Freemasons, in the mixture of mystical-occult societies of 18th century London; these were largely influenced by the mystic Jacob Boehme. "
Druidism United Kingdom - - - - 1994 King, John. The Celtic Druids' Year: Seasonal Cycles of the Ancient Celts. London, UK: Blandford (1994); pg. 54. "The massacre of Mona in AD 60 marks the end of a very short but highly significant period in the history of the British Druids. If we take the first phase, the phase of Druidism unaffected by Rome previously described, as being from undefined date, but perhaps even as early as approximately 900 BC, up to the first Roman landings in Britain in the first century BC, the second phase is a much shorter period--the 115 years from 55 BC to AD 60, which point we have just reached. The third phase, from AD 60 to the present day, when outside influences, and especially Christianity, increasingly affect, distort, diminish and marginalize Druidism... "
Druidism United Kingdom: Wales - - - - -2000 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 721. "There is no need to assume that Druidry is essentially Celtic, although from the Celtic migrations it was doubtless modified substantially. The date given for the legendary Cymry, or brotherhood colony set up in Wales, 2000 BC, seems to correspond with the date of an Iron Age migration. Certain links with the Aryan culture of early India and with the witches led T. C. Lethbridge, in his book Gogmagog, to consider that all three traditions have a common origin in South Russia or Asia Minor in perhaps the 4th millennium BC. "
Druidism United Kingdom: Wales - - - - 450 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 722. "How far was Druidry driven out by the Romans? It continued in Wales and developed the deeply poetic traditions of the 5th and later centuries, whence came the Arthurian legends and teachings. It also survived in Ireland. "
Druidism United Kingdom: Wales - - - - 1789 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 723. "With Thomas Jones of Corwen, however, we come to the beginning of the modern Eisteddfoddau when he organized a large meeting at Corwen in 1789. A proliferation of Welsh cultural societies followed, and in 1792 Iolo Morganwg (Edward Williams) started the modern Gorsedd or ceremonial circle ritual. By 1821 the Carnavon Eisteddfod was a huge affair, much patronized by the nobility and gentry. In 1860 it was decided to hold a national Eisteddfod annually, alternately in north and south Wales. "
Druidism United Kingdom: Wales - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 723. "Many people would think of modern Druids as Welsh, and certainly the movement is strong in Wales, if nationalistic rather than mystical. On the cultural side, Welsh musical contests go back to an unknown date, beore that of King Hwl the Good (c 950)... "
Druidism world 400 - - - 1970 Nichols, Ross. "Druidry " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 6. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 723. "Druidry is still a hereditary matter as well as one of organized bodies, and James Duncan, the late Father of the Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids, and an independent Druids, used to tell me that to his knowledge there were at least 400 other such Druids. Moreover, any senior group has a right to move from an existing Order to make a fresh working. There are also bodies of ancient descent which appear now to have social activities only and to have little inner teaching. "
Druidism world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 73. "[Neo-Pagan] Traditions. Alexandrians - see New Wiccan Church; Dianics - see Circle of Aradia; Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess; Susan B. Anthony Coven #1; Druid - see Ar nDraiocht Fein; Reformed Druids of North America; Gardnerian - see New Wiccan Church; Georgian - see the Georgian Church; Native American - see The Bear Tribe; Caney Indian Spiritual Circle; Sunray Meditation Society "
Druidism world - - - - 1998 *LINK* web site (1998): "British Druid Order "; web page: "Introducing the BDO " "There are now some 35 Druid groups in Britain alone, with a further 300 or so worldwide. "
Drupka Bhutan 1,118,740 70.00% - - 1991 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Buddhist:Mahayana:Drupka:
[Total pop.] estimates vary widely: 1,598,216 in July 1991 but possibly only 700,000. 70 percent Mahayana Buddhists (predominantly Drupka subsect), 25 percent Hindus, 5 percent Muslims. Indeterminate but small number of Bon adherents.
Druze Australia 2,040 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census.
Druze Israel - - - - 1957 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 216-217. "Druze:... The Druze in Israel have fought alongside Jews against Arabs, and from 1957, at the community's request, Druze did compulsory military service. The Druze in Lebanon oppose Israel and its Christian allies. "
Druze Israel 30,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 728. "The Druzes now number, in all, some 200,000 -- about 80,000 in Lebanon, 90,000 in Syria, and the rest in Israel. "
Druze Israel 35,000 - - - 1972 Hoffman, Gail. The Land and People of Israel (series: Portaits of the Nations Series). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1972, revised edition); pg. 63-64. "A special community in Israel are some 35,000 Druzes, who live in 18 vilages in Galilee and on the Carmel Range. "
Druze Israel 33,000 - - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: UNREACHED PEOPLES `79 -- David C. Cook pub. co.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) 33,000 in Israel. (300,000 total). LOCATION: Also 100,000 in Lebanon; 150,000 Syria; 12,000 in Jordan.
Druze Israel 40,000 - - - 1980 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993). [Orig. source: Dana, Nissim. The Druze: A Religious Community in Transition. Jerusalem: Turtledove Pub., 1980.]; pg. 181. "Dana, The Druze, 2-3, suggests that of the more than 400,000 Druze in the world, some 180,000 live in Syria, 140,000 in Lebanon, and 40,000 in Israel. Louis Perillier, Les Druze, 65, puts the figures quite a bit higher.
Druze Israel 52,800 1.20% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Israel ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 38, 40, 48. "Israel's 4.4 million people... "; Pg. 40: "The Arab population within the 1948 boundaries of Israel constitutes about 15% of the total population. "; Pg. 48: "Of the Arab population, 78% are Muslim, 14% are Christian, and 8% are Druze... "
Druze Israel 33,000 - - - 1990 Carlisle, Richard (editor), The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Mankind vol. 5, Marshall Cavendish: Freeport, NY (1990); pg. 523. "The Druze are now living in three different countries... The present Druze population in Syria is about 200,000 with rather more than 70,000 in Lebanon and 33,000 in Israel. "
Druze Israel - 2.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994); pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Druze Israel 50,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 216-217. "Druze:... The tennets of the Druze are only known to the initiates, but the practice emphasizes moral and social principles and loyalty the state ruling power. Around 200,000 Druze live in Lebanon, 100,000 in Syria, and 50,000 in Israel. "
Druze Israel 80,000 1.60% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 318, 320. "Location: Israel; Population: 5 million "; Pg. 320: "...and the other 1.6% (or 80,000 people) are Druze. "
Druze Israel 85,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 189. "Population figures are not exact, but estimates for Druze populations are: Lebanon, 300,000; Syria, 500,000; Israel, 85,000 (including 15,000 Syrian Druze living in the Golan Heights); Jordan, 15,000... "
Druze Israel - 1.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 5,438,000; Druze: "A quasi-Muslim sect "
Druze Israel - Arabs - 10.00% - - 1972 Hoffman, Gail. The Land and People of Israel (series: Portaits of the Nations Series). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1972, revised edition); pg. 63. "At present, 70% of the Israeli Arabs are Moslems, 20% Christian, and 10% Druze. "
Druze Israel - Arabs 52,800 8.00% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Israel ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 48. "Of the Arab population, 78% are Muslim, 14% are Christian, and 8% are Druze... "
Druze Israel: Golan Heights 16,000 - - - 1993 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: 8/7/93 issue of GLOBAL PRAYER DIGEST); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) The Druze are a close-knit religious group with an estimated population of 300,000 to 450,000. Most of them live in Syria, Lebanon and Jordan, but 16,000 reside in the Golan Heights of Israel.
Druze Jordan 12,000 - - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: UNREACHED PEOPLES `79 -- David C. Cook pub. co.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) 33,000 in Israel. (300,000 total). LOCATION: Also 100,000 in Lebanon; 150,000 Syria; 12,000 in Jordan.
Druze Jordan - - - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 49. "The vast majority of Jordan is Muslim--over 90% of the population is made up of Sunni Muslims... 8% of Jordan's population is Christian... A small number of Druze--a secretive sect that branched off from Islam-- live near the Syrian border, along with Samaritans and Circassians. "
Druze Jordan 15,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 189. "Population figures are not exact, but estimates for Druze populations are: Lebanon, 300,000; Syria, 500,000; Israel, 85,000...; Jordan, 15,000... "
Druze Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999); pg. 66. "Although most Middle East Druze reside in Lebanon, Syria and Israel, a small number live in Jordan, mainly near the Syrian border. Azraq has a Druze community. "
Druze Lebanon 66,000 6.00% - - 1932 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986); pg. 168. Table: "Estimated Demographic Change in Lebanon, 1932 - 1980 "; "Based on population of 1.1 million. "
Druze Lebanon 80,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 728. "The Druzes now number, in all, some 200,000 -- about 80,000 in Lebanon, 90,000 in Syria... "
Druze Lebanon 100,000 - - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: UNREACHED PEOPLES `79 -- David C. Cook pub. co.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) 33,000 in Israel. (300,000 total). LOCATION: Also 100,000 in Lebanon; 150,000 Syria; 12,000 in Jordan.
Druze Lebanon 140,000 - - - 1980 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993). [Orig. source: Dana, Nissim. The Druze: A Religious Community in Transition. Jerusalem: Turtledove Pub., 1980.]; pg. 181. "Dana, The Druze, 2-3, suggests that of the more than 400,000 Druze in the world, some 180,000 live in Syria, 140,000 in Lebanon, and 40,000 in Israel. Louis Perillier, Les Druze, 65, puts the figures quite a bit higher.
Druze Lebanon 208,000 8.00% - - 1980 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986); pg. 168. Table: "Estimated Demographic Change in Lebanon, 1932 - 1980 "; "Based on population of 2.6 million, not including 350,000 Palestinians. "
Druze Lebanon - - - - 1985 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 434. Pg. 434: "...Druzes... have a powerful militia that figured prominently in the fighting in Lebanon in the 1980s. "
Druze Lebanon 300,000 9.38% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Lebanon ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 42, 46. Pg. 42: "Although records show 3.3 million people... frequent emigration makes this figure only an estimate. "; Pg. 46: "The Druze are a fiercely independent and secretive religious group that have been a major factor in shaping Lebanon's history... The Druze in Lebanon are a very tightly knit minority of about 300,000 people. "
Druze Lebanon 70,000 - - - 1990 Carlisle, Richard (editor), The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Mankind vol. 5, Marshall Cavendish: Freeport, NY (1990); pg. 523. "The Druze are now living in three different countries... The present Druze population in Syria is about 200,000 with rather more than 70,000 in Lebanon and 33,000 in Israel. "
Druze Lebanon 200,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 216-217. "Druze:... The tenets of the Druze are only known to the initiates, but the practice emphasizes moral and social principles and loyalty the state ruling power. Around 200,000 Druze live in Lebanon, 100,000 in Syria, and 50,000 in Israel. "
Druze Lebanon - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 216-217. "Druze:... The Druze in Israel have fought alongside Jews against Arabs, and from 1957, at the community's request, Druze did compulsory military service. The Druze in Lebanon oppose Israel and its Christian allies. "
Druze Lebanon 250,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Druze Lebanon 300,000 10.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 189. "Population figures are not exact, but estimates for Druze populations are: Lebanon, 300,000; Syria, 500,000; Israel, 85,000...; Jordan, 15,000... The oldest and largest concentration of Druze is found in Lebanon, where they make up almost 10% of the total population. "
Druze Lebanon - 7.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 3,286,000
Druze Middle East - - - - 1050 C.E. Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 216-217. "Druze: An 11th century offshoot of Ismailis, the Druze sect settled on the slopes of Mount Hermon and later in the southern parts of Mount Lebanon. "
Druze Middle East 300,000 - - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: UNREACHED PEOPLES `79 -- David C. Cook pub. co.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) 33,000 in Israel. (300,000 total). LOCATION: Also 100,000 in Lebanon; 150,000 Syria; 12,000 in Jordan.
Druze Middle East 500,000 - - - 1993 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993); pg. 31-32. "Members of the Druze community in the Middle East today live primarily in Lebanon & Ante-Lebanon, in the vicinity of Damascus & Mount Hawran in the south of Syria in a region known as Jabal al-Druz, & in small communities in Jordan & Israel. It is difficult to ascertain exact figures, but they probably number around half a million in total. "
Druze North America - - - - 1993 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993); pg. 34-35. "As of the 1990s the three largest concentrations of Druze in North America were in Los Angeles, Houston, and Edmonton, with another significant group in Dearborn, Michigan. "


Druze, continued

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