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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Divine Light Mission Germany 500 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Divine Light Mission " in table. Source: REMID.
Divine Light Mission India 6,000,000 - - - 1973 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 63. [followers of Guru Maharaj Ji] "The movement boasted 480 centers in thirty-eight countries around the world and had an estimated 6 million followers in India alone. "
Divine Light Mission India 5,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: WORLD CHRISTIAN ENCYCLOPEDIA -- edited by David B. Barrett); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) The Divine Light Mission claims 5 million followers in India including many former nominal Indian Christians and also European and American youth
Divine Light Mission Netherlands 150 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "
Divine Light Mission USA - - - - 1970 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 319-320. "...American religious movements even thought their teachings... are traditionally Hindu. The following are some better-known examples of these missionaries and their movements... Maharaj-ji (Divine Light Mission)... Maharaj-ji (b. 1958), came from a line of spiritual masters who taught at the holy city of Hardvar. After the death of his father, the widely respected Hans-ji Maharaj, his mother ('Mata-ji') sent the boy off on a series of world tours, commencing in 1970... The movement had a large and enthusiastic, albeit short-lived, following in America, which dissipated after the boy guru and his mother disagreed... the mother returned to India, establishing her own movement, while the boy guru and his new wife remained in America. "
Divine Light Mission USA 15,000 - 45
units
- 1972 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 149. "So by the fall of 1972, Divine Light Centers were springing up in most major cities in the country. According to their count they now had 45 centers, 15,000 members, and a national center in Denver, Colorado. "
Divine Light Mission USA 35,000 - - - 1973 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 149-150. "The way Maharaj Ji's converts kept multiplying was almost unbelievable. By spring of 1973, there were 480 Divine Light Centers around the world and in every continent. The U.S. membership had now grown to 35,000. "
Divine Light Mission USA 60,000 - - - 1973 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 146. "Guru Maharaj Ji... In 1973 he claimed to have some 7 million disciples around the world, including 60,000 in the U.S. "; pg. 148: "By the time he was twelve, he was making converts by the thousands at his Divine Light Ashram on the banks of the Ganges. That year, 1969... "
Divine Light Mission USA 50,000 - - - 1973 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 63. [followers of Guru Maharaj Ji] "By 1973 there were forty to fifty thousand followers called 'premies' in the United States. About six hundred of them lived full-time in the Divine Light Mission communal ashrams, with 300 in the Denver commune. "
Divine Light Mission USA - - 5
units
- 1976 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 152. "In 1976, the Divine Light Mission cut back its operation until only five U.S. ashrams were operating. The movement was decentralized and democratized. "
Divine Light Mission USA 15,000 - - - 1980 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 66. [followers of Guru Maharaj Ji] "According to the Mission's own estimates there are presently about ten to fifteen thousand premies in the United States and 1.2 million throughout the world. "
Divine Light Mission USA - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 227. "Divine Light Mission. The American organization of the Guru Maharaj Ji (b. 1958)... During the early 1970s he attracted extensive media coverage in the United States, but disputes with members of his family weakened his influence. "
Divine Light Mission USA 50,000 - - - 1982 Long, Robert Emmet (ed.). Religious Cults in America (The Reference Shelf: Volume 66 Number 4), New York: The H. W. Wilson Co. (1994). [Orig. source: Article by J. Gordon Melton. From appendix A of The Cult Experience, Cleveland, OH: The Pilgrim Press (1982)]; pg. 90. "The [Divine Light] Mission has reportedly initiated over 50,000 people, but only a few thousand remain in the chain of ashrams that now dot the nation. "
Divine Light Mission USA 50,000 - - - 1982 Melton, J. Gordon & Robert L. Moore. The Cult Experience: Responding to the New Religious Pluralism. New York: The Pilgrim Press (1984 [3rd printing; 1st printing 1982]); pg. 142. "The Divine Light Mission grew quickly in the early seventies but suffered a severe setback in 1973 [Houston Astrodome event]. In the late seventies the Mission became a low-key organization and stopped its attempts at mass appeal. Recently, Maharaj Ji quietly moved to Miami. The Mission has reportedly initiated over 50,000 people, but only a few thousand remain the chain of ashrams that now dot the nation. "
Divine Light Mission USA 50,000 - - - 1990 Palmer, Spencer J. & Roger R. Keller. Religions of the World: A Latter-day Saint View, Brigham Young University: Provo, Utah (1990); pg. 95. "General membership numbers appox. 1.2 mil. worldwide, with 50,000 in U.S. There is a core group of 3000 active members and an additional 12,000 who attend functions and contribute regularly... The mission is [in] 53 countries... "
Divine Light Mission West, The - - - - 1971 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "DIVINE LIGHT MISSION: a modern HINDU MISSIONARY movement founded by Shri Hans MAHARAJJI (?-1966) which came to the West in 1971 under the leadership of his son the 13 year old GURU Maharajji (1959-). After initial success and extensive media coverage, the movement floundered due to mounting debts and internal strife. The movement is an offshoot of the Sant Mat, a SIKH SECT strongly influenced by HINDUISM. "
Divine Light Mission world 7,000,000 - - - 1973 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 146. "Guru Maharaj Ji... In 1973 he claimed to have some 7 million disciples around the world, including 60,000 in the U.S. "; pg. 148: "By the time he was twelve, he was making converts by the thousands at his Divine Light Ashram on the banks of the Ganges. That year, 1969... "
Divine Light Mission world - - 480
units
- 1973 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 149-150. "The way Maharaj Ji's converts kept multiplying was almost unbelievable. By spring of 1973, there were 480 Divine Light Centers around the world and in every continent. The U.S. membership had now grown to 35,000. "
Divine Light Mission world - - 480
units
38
countries
1973 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 63. [followers of Guru Maharaj Ji] "The movement boasted 480 centers in thirty-eight countries around the world and had an estimated 6 million followers in India alone. "
Divine Light Mission world 1,200,000 - - - 1980 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 66. [followers of Guru Maharaj Ji] "According to the Mission's own estimates there are presently about ten to fifteen thousand premies in the United States and 1.2 million throughout the world. "
Divine Light Mission world 1,200,000 - - 53
countries
1990 Palmer, Spencer J. & Roger R. Keller. Religions of the World: A Latter-day Saint View, Brigham Young University: Provo, Utah (1990); pg. 95. "General membership numbers appox. 1.2 mil. worldwide, with 50,000 in U.S. There is a core group of 3000 active members and an additional 12,000 who attend functions and contribute regularly... The mission is [in] 53 countries... "
Divine Light Mission world - - - 55
countries
1993 *LINK* Religious Requirements & Practices of Certain Selected Groups: A Handbook for Chaplains (1993) - (online ed. - 1998); contract #: MDA903-90-C-0062 w/ Dept. of Defense; J. Gordon Melton, Project Director & James Lewis. "HISTORICAL ORIGIN: The Divine Light Mission (the original name of Elan Vital) was founded in India in 1960. Since that time, Maharaji (formerly known as Guru Maharaj Ji) has inspired a worldwide movement that is active in approximately 55 countries. "; Listed as "Elan Vital " in the "Sikh/Sant Mat " section.
Divine Light Mission - active USA 15,000 - - - 1990 Palmer, Spencer J. & Roger R. Keller. Religions of the World: A Latter-day Saint View, Brigham Young University: Provo, Utah (1990); pg. 95. "General membership numbers appox. 1.2 mil. worldwide, with 50,000 in U.S. There is a core group of 3000 active members and an additional 12,000 who attend functions and contribute regularly... The mission is [in] 53 countries... "
Divine Light Mission - full-time Germany, West 800 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. "Another more detailed assessment for West Germany covering many more movements concludes that well over one million people are involved or 'influenced' by new religions, with a 'full-time' membership of 64,200. The estimated full time membership for 12 of these movements is: " [table]
Divine Light Mission - full-time USA 3,000 - - - 1982 Long, Robert Emmet (ed.). Religious Cults in America (The Reference Shelf: Volume 66 Number 4), New York: The H. W. Wilson Co. (1994). [Orig. source: Article by J. Gordon Melton. From appendix A of The Cult Experience, Cleveland, OH: The Pilgrim Press (1982)]; pg. 90. "The [Divine Light] Mission has reportedly initiated over 50,000 people, but only a few thousand remain in the chain of ashrams that now dot the nation. "
Divine Light Mission - full-time USA 3,000 - - - 1982 Melton, J. Gordon & Robert L. Moore. The Cult Experience: Responding to the New Religious Pluralism. New York: The Pilgrim Press (1984 [3rd printing; 1st printing 1982]); pg. 142. "The Divine Light Mission grew quickly in the early seventies but suffered a severe setback in 1973 [Houston Astrodome event]. In the late seventies the Mission became a low-key organization and stopped its attempts at mass appeal. Recently, Maharaj Ji quietly moved to Miami. The Mission has reportedly initiated over 50,000 people, but only a few thousand remain the chain of ashrams that now dot the nation. "
Divine Light Mission - full-time USA 3,000 - - - 1990 Palmer, Spencer J. & Roger R. Keller. Religions of the World: A Latter-day Saint View, Brigham Young University: Provo, Utah (1990); pg. 95. "General membership numbers appox. 1.2 mil. worldwide, with 50,000 in U.S. There is a core group of 3000 active members and an additional 12,000 who attend functions and contribute regularly... The mission is [in] 53 countries... "
Divine Science Colorado - - 1
unit
- 1898 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 99-100. "When [Small, James, Brooks & Cramer] met and joined forces in 1898, they incorporated the Divine Science College, and their church--the First Divine Science Church of Denver--was organized. "
Divine Science world - - 1
unit
1
country
1898 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 99-100. "When [Small, James, Brooks & Cramer] met and joined forces in 1898, they incorporated the Divine Science College, and their church--the First Divine Science Church of Denver--was organized. "
Divine Science world 4,000 - 18
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 231. "Divine Science Church: An 'egocentric' sect based on divine healing, founded at San Francisco in 1885 by Mrs. Malinda E. Cramer... teaching similar to that of Christian Science and reports 18 churches and 4,000 members. "
Divine Science world - - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 99-100. "For many years local churches and colleges of Divince Science were independent of one another. In 1957 some of the ministers and key workers met and organized the Divince Science Federation International... Churches and study groups are found in major U.S. cities and abroad; headquarters are in Denver, Colorado. "
Divine Science world - - 40
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 343. "New Thought's most representative groups include... International Divine Science Association (approximately 40 churches)... "
Divine Science world 5,000 - 33
units
- 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) [Orig. source: Anderson, Alan. New Thought Movement Homepage. (20 March 1998)] -
diviners Tanzania: Dar es Salaam 700 - - - 1967 East Africa (series: Library of Nations). By the editors of Time-Life Books. Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1986); pg. 136. "...the CCA and other independent churches provide traditional education and health care--curing with ancient medicines of bark and herbs. Diviners offer a rival service, calling on the spirits of traditional religion to help their clients gain advancement, solve problems or seek revenge. Such figures have always been common in the countryside... According to one estimate there were 700 diviners operating in Dar es Salaam in 1967, giving a total of 10,000 consultations daily not only to the poor, but to office workers, businessmen, and even senior politicians. "
Djerma Niger - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Dobu Papua New Guinea - - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 259. "...among the dozens of peoples who have evolved interesting cultures of wide diversity perhaps none are more bizarre than the Melanesian Dobu. These Negroid, bushy-haired people have evolved a culture where suspicion and deceit are the prime factors of human relationship... These fascinating, emphatically nasty people live on an island of volcanic ash just off the eastern tip of New Guinea... The Dobu have been declining in numbers since the white men came to their islands. Many of them have been separated from their culture by being recruited as indentured laborers. They are good workers who do not rebel against the scantiness of the rations given them, because the Dobu are used to half starving in their native villages. "
Docetism world - - - - 630 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "DOCETISM: a CHRISTIAN HERESY which maintained that CHRIST did not actually suffer and die on the Cross but only seemed to do so because Christ was a SPIRIT whose incarnate FORM was unreal. This view... is found in the QUR'AN Sura IV, 156-157 "
Dodoth Uganda - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Dogon world 250,000 - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 48, 55. "Dogon: Population: 250,000; Location: Southern Mali and northern Burkina Faso; Language: Dogon "; Pg. 55: "Strong religious belief goes into the carving of these masks, but in the past 30 years some of the Dogon have begun producing masks for the tourist art market... Like other aspects of life, the Dogon's religious system is highly complex and ordered, with detailed creation stories and a great variety of myths to explain different parts of the universe. They involve the creator-god, Amma, who made the earth from a lump of clay, and eight ancestors, pairs of whom came to earth and founded the four Dogon groups... Throughout these myths, there is a sense of balance between masculine and feminine, earth and sky, physical and spiritual. "
Dogrib North America 1,250 - - - 1670 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 87. "Dogrib... They inhabited the territory separating the Great Bear Lake and the Great Slave Lake... They numbered 1,250 in 1670, and 1,700 in 1970. "
Dogrib North America 1,700 - - - 1970 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 87. "Dogrib... They inhabited the territory separating the Great Bear Lake and the Great Slave Lake... They numbered 1,250 in 1670, and 1,700 in 1970. "
Dolgany Russia 6,571 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 125-127. "Dolgany: Location: Russia (Taimyr peninsula and along the Yenisei River); Population: 6,571 (1989 census); Religion: Orthodox Christianity; native form of shamanism "; "Traditional Dolgan religion is a form of Siberian shamansim... By the beginning of the 20th century, the Dolgan people were said to have all been converted to Orthodox Christianity. Traditional beliefs never completely disappeared, however, but instead were practiced secretly or incorporated into Christian ritual and practice. Although religious practices were prohibited in the Soviet Union, Orthodoxy is still strong and the role of shamanism in traditional culture is being revived in some areas. "
Dominican Baptist Convention Dominican Republic 1,299 - 22
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Donatists Africa - North - - - - 316 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 106. "His successor, in 316, was the able Donatus the Great, from whom the schismatics received the name Donatists. In 313, Constantine made grants of money to the 'Catholic' clergy of North Africa. In these the Donatists did not share, and appealed to the Emperor. A synod helped in Rome the same year decided against them, but the quarrel was only the more embittered... Heretical baptism was recognized, and the Roman date of Easter was approved. The Donatists appealed to the Emperor, who once more decided against them, in 316, and as they refused to yield, now proceeded to close their churches and banish their bishops... North Africa was in turmoil... these schismatics... grew rapidly, claiming to be the only true church possessed of a clergy free from 'deadly sins' and of the only valid sacraments. Not till the Mohammedan conquest did the Donatists disappear. "
Donatists Africa - North - - - - 350 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "DONATISM: a religious movement which developed during the fourth century in North Africa characterized by terrorist activity and exclusivistic BELIEFS. It was strongly opposed by AUGUSTINE who emphasized the CATHOLICITY of the CHURCH. "
Donatists Africa - North - - - - 400 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 76. "The victory of Christianity in Africa dated back to the latter half of the third century. By the time of Augustine there were more than 300 sees in Africa. But--sadly--the Church in Africa was torn by dissension between catholics and Donatists, a schism that dated back to the time of Constantine... In spite of Constantine's efforts to pressure the Donatists back into union with the Catholics, the schism lasted, and by Augustine's time the two Churches faced each other in almost every town. "
Donatists Africa - North - - - - 400 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 386. "Donatists: North African separatists of the 4th-5th century, followers of Donatus, who disavowed those bishops known as traditors ('betrayers') accused of collaborating with the Romans during their persecution of the early Christians. The Donatists formed their own church, replete with martyrs killed by the Roman church. Their main 'heresy' was their belief that the validity of the sacraments and episcopal power was predicated on personal sinlessness, so that a traditor did not qualify to be a bishop. "
Donatists Africa - North - - - - 650 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 229. "Donatism. A schismatic North African movement (early fourth - mid-seventh centuries A.D.) stressing the purity of the clergy as the guarantee of valid sacraments, opposing cooperation with secular authorities, and emphasizing martyr ideals. Named after an early leader of the group. "
Dong China 2,500,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 185. "Dong: Alternate Names: Liao; Geling; Location: China; Population: 2.5 million; Language: Dong; Chinese; Religion: Polytheism "; "The Dong are polytheistic. They regard the almighty Goddess Sasui, the most lofty of all gods, as their protector. Each village has a temple in which there is a round altar made of stone, 4 ft. in height, more than 10 ft. in diameter, surrounded by banana trees and brambles. On February 7 or 8 (lunar calendar...) the Dong will bring chicken, duck, fish, and a gruel of sweetened fried flour, as offerings to the goddess. They also revere huge stones, large trees, wells, and bridges... "
Dongba China - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 556-557. "Naxi: Alternate Names: Muoshayi, Moxieman, Nari, Naheng, Malimasha, Yuanke, Bangxi, Muoxie, Moshu, and Wuman; Location: China; Population: 300,000; Language: Naxi and Chinese "; "Most Naxi believe in a religion called 'Dongba'... Dongba is a primitive polytheistic religion. Its name comes from its founder, Donbga Shiluo. He was a precocious child, endowed with many supernatural gifts... Another theory, however, says that Dongba is originally a branch of the original, pre-Buddhist Tibetan religion, called 'Bon' (a form of Shamanism)... The religious activities involve almost every aspect of the Naxi's life... "
Donmeh Greece: Thessaloniki 10,000 - - - 1898 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 89. "More than two hundred years later, in 1898, a learned British Jew visited Salonica [pg. 8: now Thessaloniki, Greece]... Some ten thousand Donmeh lived in Salonica, about half the city's Turkish populations (Turks were Salonica's third largest ethnic group, after Jews and Greeks). "
Donmeh Turkey - - - - 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 98. "At least a core of active believers has survived. In the spring of 1960, reports Gershom Scholem, an associate of his in Istanbul interviewed the leader of the Koniosos in that city. It turned out that he had heard about Scholem. The leader was convinced that Scholem, too, was a secret Shabbatian [i.e., a Donmeh]. He had assumed there could be no other reason for anyone to be so interested in Shabbatai Zevi. "
Donmeh Turkey - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 790. Chapter on Turkey: "A unique group known as the Donme are descended from Jews who were followers of the 17th century false messiah, Shabbatai Zevi, who was ultimately forced to convert to Islam. The religion of the Donme combines elements of Judaism and Islam. "
Donmeh world - - - - 1923 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 84. "...Donmeh asked Salonica's rabbis to accept them back into Judiasm. They claimed they were really secret Jews. For the last 240 years, they said, they had only pretended to be Moslems... [Turned down, they] had no alternative but to leave Salonica. Some went to Bulgaria an other Balkan states... A few are said to have gone to Western Europe, Palestine, or America, where they may have become Jews. The vast majority joined Salonica's other Moslems in the exodus to Turkey. There, the Donmeh settled in 3 cities: Izmir (formerly Smyrna), Edirne (formerly Adrianople), and Istanbul... "
Donmeh world - - - - 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 84. The Donmeh of Salonica "claimed they were really secret Jews. For the last 240 years, they said, they had only pretended to be Moslems... [Turned down, they] had no alternative but to leave Salonica... The vast majority joined Salonica's other Moslems in the exodus to Turkey. There, the Donmeh settled in 3 cities: Izmir (formerly Smyrna), Edirne (formerly Adrianople), & Istanbul. Most continued to live together in their own neighborhoods. Some--no one knows how many--continued practicing their strange secret cult. To this day, a few aging Moslems in those cities may still be praying to the God of the Jews... "
Donmeh - Izmirlis Greece 2,500 - - - 1900 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 90-91. "Actually there was no single Donmeh religion. This tiny sect was subdivided into three smaller sub-sects. Each one lived apart, had its own secret synagogue and private cemetary, and observed separate rituals... The smallest sub-sect, with some twenty-five hundred members, was known as the Izmirlis, after Shabbatai's home town of Smyrna. They shaved their beards but not their heads. "
Donmeh - Jacobite Greece 4,000 - - - 1900 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 90. "Actually there was no single Donmeh religion. This tiny sect was subdivided into three smaller sub-sects. Each one lived apart, had its own secret synagogue and private cemetary, and observed separate rituals... The largest sub-sect, with about 4,000 members at the turn of this century, was called the Jacobites...They shaved their heads but not their beards. "
Donmeh - Koniosos Greece 3,500 - - - 1900 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 90-91. "Actually there was no single Donmeh religion. This tiny sect was subdivided into three smaller sub-sects. Each one lived apart, had its own secret synagogue and private cemetary, and observed separate rituals... The second largest sub-sect, with some thirty-five hundred members, was the Koniosos. They shaved neither thier heads nor their beards. "
Door of Faith Church and Bible School Hawaii 3,000 - 40
units
- 1979 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Holiness Pentecostals; pg. 237. "In 1979, there were 40 churches and 3,000 members in Hawaii and missions work in Okinawa and Indonesia. "
Door of Faith Church and Bible School New York - - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Holiness Pentecostals; pg. 237. "There is one church in New York. "
Door of Faith Church and Bible School world 3,000 - 40
units
4
countries
1979 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Holiness Pentecostals; pg. 237. "Membership: Not reported. There are churches at a number of locations in Hawaii and a prosperous mission has developed in the Philippines, where a Bible College has opened. There is one church in New York. In 1979, there were 40 churches and 3,000 members in Hawaii and missions work in Okinawa and Indonesia. "
Doukhobors Canada 7,400 - - - 1899 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 231. "Dukhobors... One militant group of 7,400 were helped by Leo Tolstoy to emigrate to Canada in 1898-99. "
Doukhobors Canada - - - - 1900 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 502. "A number of other communistic religious sects have flourished, some of the, such as the Russian Doukhobors, who settled in Canada at the turn of this century, espoused communism in part and for a period, but without particular success. "
Doukhobors Canada 20,000 - - - 1968 Woodcock, George & Ivan Avakumovic. The Doukhobors, Oxford University Press: New York, NY (1968); pg. 17. "In Canada a cautious guess would place the number of people of Doukhobor descent at approximately twenty thousand, thought many of these have already lost such distinguishing characteristics as religious practice, Russian language, etc. "
Doukhobors Canada 20,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 231. "Dukhobors... It is estimated that there are about 50,000 members throughout the world, of which 20,000 are in Canada and 11,000 in the Soviet Union. "


Doukhobors, continued

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