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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Dervish, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
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countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Dervish world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 216. "Dervish. A member of a Sufi order (tariqa), specifically a mendicant or beggar... The term 'dervish' was also applied to a group of nonaffiliated, itinerant Sufis, sometimes known as Malamatis or Qalandars or Hyderis. In the company of others they would engage in bizarre, deliberately offensive behavior, but because they claimed total reliance on God, they were often tolerated, and even rewarded, by domiciled, organizational Sufis. 'Dervish' entered the English language from association with the 'Whirling Dervishes,' a name derived from the frenzied yet orderly dance which they performed during musical assemblies. The real name of this group is the Mawlawis, since they were members of the order loyal to the Mawlana, Jalal ad-Din Rumi. "
Desert Fathers Egypt - - - - 400 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 216. "Desert Fathers. In the last decades of the third century some Christians, despairing of the worldliness of the church, left the cities of Egypt and lived as hermits in the desert... The mid-fourth to the mid-fifth centuries constituted the golden age. Thousands of people moved to the desert, and older monks complained about the loss of solitude. Gradually, small communities formed where the life was directed by an older, experienced monk. The next development was cenobite or communal monasticism where people lived under a rule in obedience to an abbot. "
Dhammakaya Cambodia - - - - 1890 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 51. "The first inscription in Pali is from the yar 1309; it makes clear that the Theravada was under the protection of the royal house. Since that time it has been the dominant form of Buddhism in Cambodia. Toward the end of the 19th century the Dhammayut school of Thailand [Dhammakaya?] gained a foothold in Cambodia. "
Dhammakaya - full-time employees Thailand 400 - - - 1990 *LINK* Heikkila-Horn, Marja-Leena. "Two Paths to Revivalism in Thai Buddhism: The Dhammakaya and Santi Asoke Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 93-111. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999). "In 1990, the Dhammakaya had some 400 full-time employees, 200 working in the office and another 200 in the garden. In addition to the employees they have a corps of volunteers who reach out to thousands of people. The majority of the persons I met were Sino-Thai academics or business people. They have some 300 monks... "
Dhammakaya - monastic Thailand 300 - - - 1990 *LINK* Heikkila-Horn, Marja-Leena. "Two Paths to Revivalism in Thai Buddhism: The Dhammakaya and Santi Asoke Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 93-111. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999). "In 1990, the Dhammakaya had some 400 full-time employees, 200 working in the office and another 200 in the garden. In addition to the employees they have a corps of volunteers who reach out to thousands of people. The majority of the persons I met were Sino-Thai academics or business people. They have some 300 monks... "
Dharmaguptaka Buddhism world - - - - -250 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 151. "During Asoka's council (around 250 B.C.) the Sthaviras spawned the Sarvastivadins and the Vibhajyavadins... Other major groups spawned by the Sthavira tradition include the Sautrantikas and Dharmaguptakas. "
Dharmaguptaka Buddhism world - - - - -150 B.C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 129. "The Hinayana enumerates the traditions of 18 schools that developed out of the original community... Two other schools that splintered from the Sthaviras are the Sarvastivada, out of which, around 150 B.C.E., came the Sautrantikas, and the Vibhajyavadins, who see themselves as orthodox Sthaviras. Out of this last school arose the Theravada, Mahishasakas, and Kashyapiyas; from the Mahishasakas came the Dharmaguptakas. "
Dharmottariya Buddhism world - - - - -230 B.C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 129. "The Hinayana enumerates the traditions of 18 schools that developed out of the original community... the Vatsiputriyas (also called Pudgalavadins) separated themselves from the Sthaviras around 240 B.C.E. The Vatsiputriya had 4 subdivisions: Dharmottariya, Bhadrayaniya, Sammatiya, and Sannagarika (or Sandagiriya). "
Dialonke Guinea - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Dialouge Centre India 1 - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "In India one person 'was' the Dialogue Centre for several years, and in Ireland this was also more or less the case. "
Dialouge Centre Ireland 1 - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "In India one person 'was' the Dialogue Centre for several years, and in Ireland this was also more or less the case. "
Dialouge Centre Russia 4 - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "Another striking similaritry is the fact that the Dialogue Centre's members outside Denmark are very few. In Russia, where an attempt is being made to influence the Orthodox Church as well as government officials, those representing the organization are, apart from two Danish theologians, one or two priests of the Orthodox Church "
Dialouge Centre world - - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "The organization, paradoxically known as the Dialouge Centre, has spread into many different countries. It is represented in Germany, Ireland, Greece, Finland, Iceland, England, Russia and many other East European countries including the Tzcek Republic and Romania, India and several places in South-East Asia... The Dialogue Centre itself is a religious group... it is led by a charismatic priest, it has experienced the same kinds of trauma with internal oppositions as many other religious groups... it seems fair to classify the Dialogue Centre as some kind of Christian new religious group "
Diamond Sangha Hawaii - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Melbourne Zen Group adheres to the Zen Buddhist religion. The group originated in Melbourne in May, 1985. It practices a traditional form of Zen Buddhist meditation which has developed through its close relationship with the Sydney Zen Centre and with the Diamond Sangha founded by Robert Aitken Roshi, in Hawaii. "
Diamond Tradition world 5 - - - 1999 Email response from Ravan Asteris, who considers her religion to be the Diamond Tradition, as described on the Diamond Tradition web site. [ "Ravan Asteris " is her nom de net; email address: rasteris@rahul.net] Ravan Asteris: "I think that there are maybe five of us, with three having actual initiated standing. "
Dianic Wicca world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 68. "Dianics probably constitute the fastest growing group in the Pagan community. Thousands of women--young, old, feminist, lesbian, bisexual, heterosexual, and even mainstream Pagan--are beginning to identify as Dianics... It is a living and vital religion even in strict sociological terms. "
Dianic Wicca world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 73. "[Neo-Pagan] Traditions. Alexandrians - see New Wiccan Church; Dianics - see Circle of Aradia; Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess; Susan B. Anthony Coven #1; Druid - see Ar nDraiocht Fein; Reformed Druids of North America; Gardnerian - see New Wiccan Church; Georgian - see the Georgian Church; Native American - see The Bear Tribe; Caney Indian Spiritual Circle; Sunray Meditation Society "
Dianic Wicca world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 68-69. "There are actually three varieties of Wiccans who consider themselves to be Dianics. Probably the smallest group is mainstream Pagans who have a concept of both female and male deities... The second common group... is similar to that of feminist Witches. They are... primarily heterosexual or bisexual, women who have come to the Craft through feminism or through the women's movement... The third group... is lesbian Dianics... "
Dianic Wicca world - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Celtic Connection " (by "Herne "); web page: "Various Wiccan Traditions " (viewed 21 March 1999). "The Dianic Craft includes two distinct branches: One branch, founded in Texas by Morgan McFarland & Mark Roberts... [is] sometimes called 'Old Dianic', & there are still covens of this tradition, esp. in Texas. Other covens, similar... but not directly descended from the McFarland... line, are sprinkled around the country.; The other branch, sometimes called Feminist Dianic Witchcraft... The major network is Re-Formed Congregation of the Goddess, which publishes 'Of a Like Mind' newspaper & sponsors conferences on Dianic Craft. "
Dianic Wicca - Feminist world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 68. "The 2nd group of Dianics is similar to that of feminist Witches. They are of all sexual preferences, but primarily heterosexual or bisexual, women who have come to the Craft through feminism or through the women's movement... The definition of these women is evolving. The description of a non-lesbian woman as a Dianic is one which many 'straight' women were reluctant to accept & which many lesbians rejected out-of-hand until only a few years ago... still a controversial issue within Dianic Craft. "
Dianic Wicca - Feminist world - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Celtic Connection " (by "Herne "); web page: "Various Wiccan Traditions " (viewed 21 March 1999). "The Dianic Craft includes two distinct branches: One branch... is sometimes called 'Old Dianic'... other branch, sometimes called Feminist Dianic Witchcraft, focus exclusively on the Goddess & consists of women-only covens and groups... strong lesbian presence in the movement... The major network is Re-Formed Congregation of the Goddess, which publishes 'Of a Like Mind' newspaper and sponsors conferences on Dianic Craft. "
Dianic Wicca - Lesbian world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 69. "The third group of Dianics is lesbian Dianics... Lesbian Dianics is the most active and visible of all those who call themselves Dianics. The lesbian press is full of dialog and information about lesbian spirituality which, for many, is synonymous with Dianic Wicca. "
Dianic Wicca - Old Dianic Texas - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Celtic Connection " (by "Herne "); web page: "Various Wiccan Traditions " (viewed 21 March 1999). "The Dianic Craft includes two distinct branches: One branch, founded in Texas by Morgan McFarland and Mark Roberts, gives primacy to the Goddess in its theology, but honors the Horned God as Her Beloved Consort. Covens are mixed, including both women and men. This branch is sometimes called 'Old Dianic', and there are still covens of this tradition, especially in Texas. Other covens, similar in teleology but not directly descended from the McFarland / Roberts line, are sprinkled around the country. "
Dianic Wicca - Old Dianic USA - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Celtic Connection " (by "Herne "); web page: "Various Wiccan Traditions " (viewed 21 March 1999). "The Dianic Craft includes two distinct branches: One branch, founded in Texas by Morgan McFarland and Mark Roberts, gives primacy to the Goddess in its theology, but honors the Horned God as Her Beloved Consort. Covens are mixed, including both women and men. This branch is sometimes called 'Old Dianic', and there are still covens of this tradition, especially in Texas. Other covens, similar in teleology but not directly descended from the McFarland / Roberts line, are sprinkled around the country. "
Dianic Wicca - Old Dianic world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 68. "There are actually three varieties of Wiccans who consider themselves to be Dianics. Probably the smallest group is mainstream Pagans who have a concept of both female and male deities and who (before it was common for feminist Witche to call themselves Dianics) identified with the ancient Celtic traditions which Margaret Murray identified in her books... "
Diegueno North America - Pacific Coast 3,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Diegueño "
Diegueno world 3,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Diegueño "
Difunta Correa Argentina - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 57. "The Catholic religion also faces its own internal conflicts, particularly where popular beliefs differ from official doctrine--such as the example of the cult of Difunta Correa, based in the San Juan province. Despite a determined campaign by the church authorities to undermine her veneration, hundreds of Argentine Catholics continue to make annual pilgrimages and offerings. "
Digambaras India - - - - 1000 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 370. "In the centuries after the Svetambara-Digambara division, the Svetambaras were predominant in th West and Northwest (modern-day Maharashtra, Gujarat, and Rajasthan), while the Digambaras dominated the movement in Central and Southern India. "
Digambaras India - - - - 1978 Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978); pg. 16. "Since [A.D. 475] the Svetambaras, who are the larger [Jain] group, have been strongest in Gujarat and Rajasthan, in northewest India, while the Digambaras, now declining, are concentrated in the Deccan, a long mountainous plateau along the southwest coast, and in the old princely state of Mysore. "
Digambaras India - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 91. "Digambara: 1. 'clothed in air,' i.e., naked. In Hinduism, the fat that a sadhu goes about naked means that he is no longer bound to his sexual identity; 2. the name of one of the two major sects of Jainism. "
Digambaras India - - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 211. "The Digambaras are now found mainly in the Deccan and Mysore, and comprise several communities or sanghas. "
Digambaras - monastic India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 223. "Digambara. One of the two major monastic traditions in Jainism. The name refers to the requirement that monks renounce all possessions, including all clothing, and live completely naked, i.e. 'dressed [only] in the four directions [of the compass].' "
Digambaras - monastic India 175 - - - 1984 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 208. "According to a survey, in 1984 there were about 5,620 Jaina ascetics -- monks and nuns -- the majority belonging to the Scvetambara sect (1,200 monks and 3,400 nuns), followed by the Sthanakavasis (325 monks and 520 nuns), and then the Digambaras (65 monks, 60 'lay brothers' and 50 'lay sisters'). "
Diggers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1650 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 499. "It is not every society that allows men to congregat in this way. The Levellers and diggers of 17th century England were seen as a threat to the social order, and when this is the response of the political authorities such groups are not permitted to establish themselves. "
Diggers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1660 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "DIGGERS: a radical SECT led by Gerrard WINSTANLEY (1609-1660) which emerged during the English Civil War to advocate agrarian communism and egalitarianism. "
Dinka Sudan 1,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 118-119. "Dinka: Location: Republic of Sudan; Population: Over 1 million; Language: Dinka; Religion: Monotheistic-worship of Nhialic "; "Dinka religious beliefs have been described and analyzed in detail by the late British anthropologist R. G. Lienhardt in his book Divinity and Experience: The Religion of the Dinka. "
Dinka world 1,000,000 - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 43-44. "Dinka: Population: 1,000,000; Location: Sudan and Ethiopia; Language: Dinka "; Pg. 44: "...every Dinka must know his or her ancestors, because there are strict taboos against marriage to someone in your own family... The Dinka reject external forms of authority based on their past experience with outside rulers... pursue a lifestyle based on honor and dignity. All Dinka are expected to be kind and generous to others in order to achieve status within their own culture. "
Diocese of Christ the King world 5,000 - 35
units
- 1983 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 101-102. "Diocese of Christ the King... Oakland, CA [H.Q.]... The Diocese... is at one in faith and practice with the other Anglican bodies... It rejects both the National Council of Churches and the World Council of Churches. It differs from the Anglican Catholic Church only in matters of administration... Membership: In 1983... had 35 parishes with an estimated 3,000 to 5,000 members. "
Diola Senegal - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Diola Senegal 756,000 9.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 59. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Dionysus worship Greece - - - - -1000 B.C.E. Otto, Walter F. (Translated by Robert B. Palmer.) Dionysus: Myth and Cult. Dallas, Texas: Spring Publications (1981 - reissued; English translation first pub. 1965 by Indiana University Press); pg. 58. "The familiarity which Homeric epic has with the religion of Dionysus leads us to the same conclusion we could have drawn from the Ionic Anthesteria. Dionysus must have already been indigenous to Greek civilization toward the end of the second millennium at least... Everything which has been advanced recently to prove his migration from Thrace or Phrygia is in no way convincing. In its older form this hyposthesis was, as we know, represented by Erwin Rohde. He speaks of the 'Thracian cult of ecstasy' which invaded Greece with frightening savagery and was adopted only after serious oposition. "
Dionysus worship Greece - - - - -700 B.C.E. Otto, Walter F. (Translated by Robert B. Palmer.) Dionysus: Myth and Cult. Dallas, Texas: Spring Publications (1981 - reissued; English translation first pub. 1965 by Indiana University Press); pg. 52. "The Birthplace of the Cult of Dionysus: Nowadays it is believed that research has conclusively proven that Dionysus made his way into Greece as a foreigner, and that he was able to receive recognition only after overcoming powerful opposition. Thrace, and Phrygia, which was inhabited by a related people, are looked upon as his birthplace. It was thought at first that he migrated directly from Thrace to Greece. More recently, however, it is held that compelling reasons have been discovered for the idea that he came, rather, over the sea, out of Phrygia or Lydia. Both views were finally combined by Nilsson. According to him, Dionysus must have made his way into the Greek mainland from Thrace as well as from Phrygia, once in his old-Thracian form, and the othe time in a form modified by the influence of neighboring religions in Asia Minor. "
Dionysus worship Greece - - - - -700 B.C.E. Otto, Walter F. (Translated by Robert B. Palmer.) Dionysus: Myth and Cult. Dallas, Texas: Spring Publications (1981 - reissued; English translation first pub. 1965 by Indiana University Press); pg. 53. "The Greeks themselves considered their principal cults of Dionysus to be age-old. How right they were in this is shown by the fact that the 'old Dionysia,' the name given to the Anthesteria by Thucydides, were common to the Ionic tribes, and, as the festival of Dionysus, have to be older than the partition and migration of the Ionians, ad Deubner rightly notes. In Delphi the worship of Dionysus could be considered older than that of Apollo. In Smyrna, where the Anthesteria were celebrated by bringing in Dionysus on a ship set on wheels, there is evidence of a festival of Dionysus alread for the period when the city was still Aeolic. "
Dionysus worship Greece - - - - -700 B.C.E. Otto, Walter F. (Translated by Robert B. Palmer.) Dionysus: Myth and Cult. Dallas, Texas: Spring Publications (1981 - reissued; English translation first pub. 1965 by Indiana University Press); pg. 52-53. "Contrary to the opinion which has prevailed up to now, the mainland of Greece, itself, is designated as the third seat of the Dionysiac movement, because the great excitement which the arrival of Dionysus evoked there is supposed to have been only a re-awakening of an age-old worship. Hence, one is forced to assume that the concepts and rites attached to his name had already belonged to the pre-Greek population. If we ask for the date when the foreigner supposedly made his way into the ranks of the Greek gods, Wilamowitz explains that he arrived on the mainland, at the earliest, in the eighth century, and that his victory over the orthodox believers may not be dated prior to the yeear 700 [B.C.] "
Dionysus worship Greece - - - - -500 B.C.E. Otto, Walter F. (Translated by Robert B. Palmer.) Dionysus: Myth and Cult. Dallas, Texas: Spring Publications (1981 - reissued; English translation first pub. 1965 by Indiana University Press); pg. 58. "...the cult of Dionysus was at its most active in Greece in precisely those areas in which the knowledge of it had been preserved by previous Thracian inhabitants, namely, in Phocis and in Boeotia. Under these circumstances one might well thikn that the Thracians could have brought this cult to central Greece. But it could ust as well have found its way from Greece to Thrace; and the well-known orgiastic cults of Thrace... could... be used to prove that it was precisely the Thracians who must have been very rady to accept a Greek Dionysus. "
Dionysus worship Greece - - - - -400 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1925, 1928. "There had been Dionysiac initiations in all reek towns, since very early times. Originally they were of the same type as race initiations. However, when a new and personal devoutness arose in Orphic circles, particularly in Eleusis, this affected the Dionysiac initiations, which gradually took on individualistic tendencies. During the Imperial period the Dionysiac Mysteries were a religion of the same type as the other Mystery religions. There were Dionysiac mystics in all towns, but Eleusinian initiations were held only in Eleusis and Alexandria. "
Dionysus worship Roman Empire - - - - -500 B.C.E. Otto, Walter F. (Translated by Robert B. Palmer.) Dionysus: Myth and Cult. Dallas, Texas: Spring Publications (1981 - reissued; English translation first pub. 1965 by Indiana University Press); pg. 143-144. "What these mean to the followers of Dionysus can be seen in innumberable works of art... In Argos the grave of a maenad with the name of Xopeia was exhibited. We come across maenads making music on vase paintings and in the poetry of Nonnus... women who celebrate the Agrionia in Chaeronea. On the island of Naxos he is called... In the hymn of Philodamus of Skarpheia, it says that he went from Thebes to Pieriea, where the Muses received him... There were altars to Dionysus and the Charites at the Pelopion in Olympia... there was an oracle of Dionysus in Thrace with a prophetess... In Greece itself, of course, we know of only one Dionysiac oracle, that in Phocean Amphicleia... "
Dionysus worship Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 34. "Much more powerful as a rival to Christianity were the mystery religions that were quite numerous & rapidly spreading during this period. They were syncretistic kinds of faiths that fused Hellenic & Oriental thought. The most important ones were the Dionysian & Orphic mysteries of Thrace; the Eleusinian from Eleusis, near Athens... "
Dionysus worship Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1928. "The various Mysteries appealed to sociologically different strata of society. The Dionysiac Mysteries were often a cult of the upper bourgeoisie... "
Dionysus worship Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 307. "The Greeks called [Mithraism] and other such cults--like those of Eleusis, Dionysus, and Isis--mysteria, from a root meaning literally 'to keep one's mouth shut,' and from which the English words mystery and mysticism are derived. The term mystery applies to a sect capable of conferring initiation on its members. "
Discordianism world - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Celtic Connection " (by "Herne "); web page: "Various Wiccan Traditions " (viewed 21 March 1999). "The Discordian or Erisian movement is described as a 'Non-Prophet Irreligious Disorganization and has claimed 'The Erisian revelation is not a complicated put-on disguised as a new religion, but a new religion disguised as a complicated put-on.' It all started with the Principia Discordia, or How I Found the Goddess and What I Did to Her When I Found Her, a collection of articles and ideas compiled by Greg Hill (Malaclypse the Young-er). "
Divine Life Society California - - 1
unit
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 229. "...the message of Swami Sivananda is being widely disseminated. Branches of the [Divine Life] Society in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New Haven, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Los Angeles, and Albuquerque, and in 3 Canadian cities... "
Divine Life Society Canada - - 8
units
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 229. "...the message of Swami Sivananda is being widely disseminated. Branches of the [Divine Life] Society in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New Haven, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Los Angeles, and Albuquerque, and in 3 Canadian cities... "
Divine Life Society Connecticut - - 1
unit
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 229. "...the message of Swami Sivananda is being widely disseminated. Branches of the [Divine Life] Society in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New Haven, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Los Angeles, and Albuquerque, and in 3 Canadian cities... "
Divine Life Society Florida - - 3
units
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 229. "...the message of Swami Sivananda is being widely disseminated. Branches of the [Divine Life] Society in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New Haven, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Los Angeles, and Albuquerque, and in 3 Canadian cities... "
Divine Life Society Illinois - - 1
unit
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 229. "...the message of Swami Sivananda is being widely disseminated. Branches of the [Divine Life] Society in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New Haven, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Los Angeles, and Albuquerque, and in 3 Canadian cities... "
Divine Life Society India - - 164
units
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 176. "137 affiliated branches [of the Divine Life Society] have been established in India and 27 overseas. The overses branches also have satellite branches in smaller cities. To disseminate the teachings of Swami Sivananda and Swami Chidananda... "
Divine Life Society India - - 137
units
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 176. "137 affiliated branches [of the Divine Life Society] have been established in India and 27 overseas. The overses branches also have satellite branches in smaller cities. To disseminate the teachings of Swami Sivananda and Swami Chidananda... "
Divine Life Society India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 319-320. "Swami Vishnu-Devananda... set up... True World Order; it is based on a similar large movement, the Divine Life Society, established by his famous teacher Swami Sivananda in the India holy city of Rishikesh. "
Divine Life Society Michigan - - 1
unit
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 229. "...the message of Swami Sivananda is being widely disseminated. Branches of the [Divine Life] Society in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New Haven, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Los Angeles, and Albuquerque, and in 3 Canadian cities... "
Divine Life Society New Mexico - - 1
unit
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 229. "...the message of Swami Sivananda is being widely disseminated. Branches of the [Divine Life] Society in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New Haven, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Los Angeles, and Albuquerque, and in 3 Canadian cities... "
Divine Life Society North America - - 17
units
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 229. "...the message of Swami Sivananda is being widely disseminated. Branches of the [Divine Life] Society in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New Haven, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Los Angeles, and Albuquerque, and in 3 Canadian cities... "
Divine Life Society USA - - 9
units
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 229. "...the message of Swami Sivananda is being widely disseminated. Branches of the [Divine Life] Society in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New Haven, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Los Angeles, and Albuquerque, and in 3 Canadian cities... "
Divine Life Society Washington, D.C. - - 1
unit
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 229. "...the message of Swami Sivananda is being widely disseminated. Branches of the [Divine Life] Society in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New Haven, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Daytona Beach, Los Angeles, and Albuquerque, and in 3 Canadian cities... "


Divine Life Society, continued

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