Adherents.com Home Page

Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Oklahoma

Cumberland Presbyterian Church, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Cumberland Presbyterian Church Oklahoma - - 21
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web page: 1998 Yearbook of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church counted from directory: "Location Index of Churches "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church Tennessee 38,684 0.79% 289
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 36,233.
Cumberland Presbyterian Church Tennessee - - 278
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web page: 1998 Yearbook of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church counted from directory: "Location Index of Churches "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church Texas 10,373 0.06% 50
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 9,177.
Cumberland Presbyterian Church Texas 9,177 0.05% - - 1990 Ramos, Mary G. (ed). 1996-1997 Texas Almanac. Dallas, TX: Dallas Morning News (1995). [Source: Glenmary: "Churches & Church Membership in the U.S., 1990 "]; pg. 325-327. Table: "Religious Groups, Members/Adherents, In Texas, 1990 "; pg. 7: Texas pop. (1990 U.S. census): 16,986,335; "Data based on reports from 133 church bodies. "; This figure is from MEMBERS column ( "Members " in this study includes only communicant, confirmed members with full membership status), not the more inclusive "adherents " column.
Cumberland Presbyterian Church Texas 10,373 0.06% - - 1990 Ramos, Mary G. (ed). 1996-1997 Texas Almanac. Dallas, TX: Dallas Morning News (1995). [Source: Glenmary: "Churches & Church Membership in the U.S., 1990 "]; pg. 325-327. Table: "Religious Groups, Members/Adherents, In Texas, 1990 "; pg. 7: Texas pop. (1990 U.S. census): 16,986,335; "Data based on reports from 133 church bodies. "; This figure is from ADHERENT column ( "Adherents " defined as all members, incl. regular participants not considered as communicant.), not the more restrictive "member " column.
Cumberland Presbyterian Church Texas - - 50
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web page: 1998 Yearbook of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church counted from directory: "Location Index of Churches "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church USA 170,000 - - - 1829 Spence, Hartzell. The Story of America's Religions; New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1960) [1st printing 1957]; pg. 67. "Thousands of frontier people.. organized the Cumberland Presbytery. By 1829, it has 170,000 members, chiefly in Ohio, Kentucky and farther south. "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church USA 84,579 - 756
units
- 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 163-164. "Cumberland Presbyterian Church... Memphis, TN [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1987 the Church reported 84,579 members, 756 churches, and 724 ministers in the United States. "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church USA 91,040 - 737
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns.
Cumberland Presbyterian Church USA 91,646 - 759
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 201. "This church reports 91,646 members in 759 congregatinos, located for the most part in southern and border states, with some congregations in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Iowa, New Mexico, Arizona, and California. "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church USA 92,433 - 784
units
- 1991 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from table's "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Cumberland Presbyterian Church. "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church USA 92,240 - 782
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). -
Cumberland Presbyterian Church USA 87,896 - 783
units
- 1995 *LINK* web site for Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches (accessed 1998); [Orig. source: Source: Kenneth B. Bedell, editor, Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches, annual.] Table: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches: U.S. Religious Bodies with more than 60,000 Members "; "...prepared for the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census... for the 1997 edition of the Statistical Abstract of the U.S. "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church USA 87,896 - 783
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
Cumberland Presbyterian Church USA 88,068 - 771
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Cumberland Presbyterian Ch.
Cumberland Presbyterian Church world - - 2
units
- 1813 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 163. "In 1813, those still unable to find reconciliation with the Kentucky Synod formed two more presbyteries, Elk and Logan, and created the Cumberland Synod. Growth was quick and the Cumberland Synod spread in every direction from its Tennessee and Kentucky base. By 1829, when the General Assembly of the Cumberland Presbyterian church was organized, the church had reached into eight states. "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church world 170,000 - - - 1829 Spence, Hartzell. The Story of America's Religions; New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1960) [1st printing 1957]; pg. 67. "Thousands of frontier people.. organized the Cumberland Presbytery. By 1829, it has 170,000 members, chiefly in Ohio, Kentucky and farther south. "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church world 180,000 - - - 1890 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 213. "By 1890 it had about 180,000 communicants. "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church world - - 111
units
- 1905 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 163-164. "Post-Civil War efforts at reunion came to fruition in 1906 when the main body of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church reunited with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, now an integral part of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). From the Cumberland point of view, though, the union was not altogether a happy one. The union carried by only a sligh majority of 60 presbyteries to 51, and a large segment of the church refused to go into the united church. They reorganized themselves as the continuing Cumberland Presbyterian Church... "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church world 72,500 - - - 1943 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 213. "In 1903... Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A... reunion between it and the Cumberland Church... accomplished in 1906. A minority dissented and continued the Cumberland Church, which in 1943 had about 72,500 communicants. "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church world 86,000 - - - 1957 Spence, Hartzell. The Story of America's Religions; New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1960) [1st printing 1957]; pg. 68. "Part of the Cumberland Presbytery rejoined the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. in 1906, but enough members declined the merger to preserve the independent body, now numbering 86,000. "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church world 90,703 - - 5
countries
1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 163-164. "Cumberland Presbyterian Church... Membership: In 1987 the Church reported 84,579 members, 756 churches, and 724 ministers in the United States. There were an additional 6,124 members in missions in Colombia, Hong Kong, Japan, and Liberia. "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church world - - 776
units
6
countries
1998 *LINK* official organization web page: 1998 Yearbook of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church counted from directory: "Location Index of Churches "
Cumberland Presbyterian Church in America USA 15,142 - 152
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Cumberland Presbyterian Ch. in America. This body is listed separately from 'Cumberland Presbyterian Church', which is about 5 times larger.]
Cuna Latin America - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 144-145. "Cunas: Location: San Blas Islands (or Mulatas Archipelago), along the Gulf of Darien from Panama to the Colombian border); Language: Cuna...; Religion: Indigenous spirit-based beliefs "; "Today the Cunas inhabit an area that includes part of Panama and part of Colombia... The comparative inaccessibility of the Cuna settlements has helped them preserve their way of life... The Cunas have a close connection with nature and see themselves as a part of it... Becoming a shaman is regarded as an important vocation. Shamans may be men or women, and they perform three types of functions: curing illness in individuals, believed to be caused in most cases by the loss of one's soul; curing villages of epidemic illness; and establishing rapport with spirits... "
Cupeno North America - Pacific Coast 500 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Cupeņo "
Cupeno world 500 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Cupeņo "
Curanderismo Mexico - - - - 1998 Davis, Rod. American Voudou: Journey Into A Hidden World. Denton, Texas: University of North Texas Press (1998); pg. 9. "In different areas, voudou has different rituals and doctrines, running a sectarian range roughly comparable to that from Judaism through Protestantism to Catholicism. In Haiti, the religion metamorphosed into vodun or vaudoux; in Cuba, santeria, in Brazil, candomble; in Trinidad, Shango Baptist; in Mexico, curanderismo; in Jamaica, obeah. In the American South, it became voodoo and, in the most extreme caricature, hoodoo... "
Cusabo North America - Southeastern Woodlands 2,800 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Cusabo world 2,800 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Cybele the Great Mother Roman Empire - - - - -204 B.C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 10. "The great majority of those who felt religious longings simply adopted Oriental religions... The most popular of these Oriental religions were those of the Great Mother (Cybele) and Attis, originating in Asia Minor; of Isis and Serapis from Egypt; and of Mithras from Persia... That of the Great Mother, which was essentially a primitive nature worship, accompanies by licentious rites, reached Rome in B.C. 204, and was the first to gain extensive foothold in the West. "
Cybele the Great Mother Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 34. "Much more powerful as a rival to Christianity were the mystery religions that were quite numerous & rapidly spreading during this period. They were syncretistic kinds of faiths that fused Hellenic & Oriental thought. The most important ones were the Dionysian & Orphic mysteries of Thrace; the Eleusinian from Eleusis, near Athens; the religion of the Great Mother, Cybele, from Anatolia in Asia Minor; the Persian religion of Mithra and the Egyptian cult of Isis & Osiris. "
Cybele the Great Mother Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 34-35. "One of the best-known mystery religions is that of Cybele, the Great Mother. Like the others it gives evidence of having originated in fertily rites associated with the vegetative rhythms of nature... Cybele, the mother of all gods and men, had as her companion the semidivine Attis, who betrayed her and then in remorse castrated himself and died. The Great Mother, however, restored him to life and deified him, making him immortal... "
Cybele the Great Mother Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1928. "During the Hellenistic period... very little is heard about Mysteries. But at the time of the Roman Empire such religions suddenly sprang up. The best-known are the Mysteries of Isis and Mithras. However, there were also groups which worshipped Attis and the Great Mother (see Cybele)... "
Cymmry Wicca, Association of USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 74. "Association of Cymmry Wicca, Lady Branwen, P.O. Box 1866, Athens, GA 30603. Followers of the ancient path of the Celtic Nations; correspondence course available for serious students; the Association is a group of covens and groves in US who worship as Pagans and Witches... "
Cynicism Greece - - - - -323 B.C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 305. "...Roman religion... included various moral schools, largely influenced by Greek philosophy... Cynicism, for example, as founded by the Greek Antisthenes and exemplified by Diogenes of Sinope (of lantern fame, c. 412-323 BC), derived from the Socratic notion that virtue is the only good and the chief means to happiness. By virtue, Cynics meant the knowledge of what is good, apart from the opinions of polite society. In principle, they believed in independence and a kind of asceticism that was indifferent to poverty or wealth, pleasure or pain. But in practice this often translated into calculatedly outrageous behavior and nose-thumbing, from which the modern use of the term cynic derives. "
Cynicism Roman Empire - - - - 300 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 305-306. "...Roman religion... included various moral schools, largely influenced by Greek philosophy... Cynicism... Stoicism... Epicureanism... All three schools were commonly adopted and practiced by the Romans until Christianity became predominant in the 3rd or 4th century and stamped them out as formal schools. "
Cyprus Orthodox world 500,000 - - - 1984 Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 99. "Figure 2.6: Eastern Christianity today: the Orthodox Church " [autocephalous churches in communion with Constantinople]
Cyprus Orthodox world 500,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* OPPOSING VIEW (anti-) web page: "Orthodox " (viewed 26 Feb. 1999) "Autocephalus Churches: Russia (88 mill.), Romania (17 mill.), Greece (8 mill.), Servia (7 mill.), Bulgaria (6 Mill.), Georgia (1 mill.), Poland (0.6 mill.), Cyprus (0.5 mill.), Czechoislovakia (0.2 mill.), Albania, Sinai (0.1 mill.).... "
Czechoslovak Baptist Convention of America North America - - - - 1979 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 265. "Many ethnic Baptist groups swell the total of the fellowship in the United States: Finnish Baptist Union of America, French Baptist Conference, Hungarian Baptist Union, Italian Baptist Association, Polish Baptist Conference in the U.S.A. and Canada; Roumanian Baptist Association and the Czechoslovak Baptist Convention of America. "
Czechoslovak Baptist Convention of the USA/Canada USA 1,500 - 7
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Czechoslovakian Orthodox world 200,000 - - - 1984 Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 99. "Figure 2.6: Eastern Christianity today: the Orthodox Church " [autocephalous churches in communion with Constantinople]
Czechoslovakian Orthodox world 200,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* OPPOSING VIEW (anti-) web page: "Orthodox " (viewed 26 Feb. 1999) "Autocephalus Churches: Russia (88 mill.), Romania (17 mill.), Greece (8 mill.), Servia (7 mill.), Bulgaria (6 Mill.), Georgia (1 mill.), Poland (0.6 mill.), Cyprus (0.5 mill.), Czechoislovakia (0.2 mill.), Albania, Sinai (0.1 mill.).... "
Dadupanthis India - - - - 1603 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "DADUPANTHIS: HINDU REVITALIZATION MOVEMENT which rejected or reformulated many TRADITIONAL Hindu BELIEFS. REBIRTH as an animal was considered impossible and reinterpreted as symbolic of the mood of the individual. BHAKTI played an important role in this movement which was founded by a LAY-MAN, Dd (1544-1603). His followers included PRIESTS and the movement shared many of the characteristics of SIKHISM. "
Dagomba Ghana - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Dai China 1,000,000 - - - 1990 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 176. "Dai: Alternate Names: Daile, Daina, Daiya, Daibengm, Dainyue, Dan, Liao, Gold Teeth, Silver Teeth, Black Teeth, Baiyi; Location: China; Population: Over 1 million; Language: Dai; Religion: Polytheism; ancestor worship; some Buddhism "; "The Dai population amounted to just over one million in 1990. They are mainly concentrated in Xishuangbanna Dai Autonomous Prefecture (South Yunnan) and in three western Yunnan 'mixed administrations'... The Dai are polytheistic. They offer sacrifices to 'Diula' (a divined ancestor) on an annual three-year, and even nine-year cycle... Hinayana Buddhsim came to the Dai in the 7th century (according to another version, in the 14th century)... In Dai areas, each vilalge has its own temple and mokns are very common. "
Dai China - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 45. "Today there are Buddhists among the Han Chinese, the Mongols, Tibetans, Manchus, Tu, Qiang and Dai (Hinayana Buddhists) peoples. "
Dairi Indonesia 100,000 - - - 1990 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 101. "Batak: Location: Indonesia (North Sumatra); Population: 3 to 6 million "; "According to the 1990 census, speakers of the... [three] Batak languages... numbered over 3.1 million... Assuming the percentages given in the 1930 colonial census are still accurate, one can break the total down as follows: 1.65 million Toba, living around Lake Toba, on Samosir Island, & in the highlands to the south; 500,000 Karo to the northwest of the lake; 200,000 Simalungun, east of the lake; 100,000 Dairi, west of the lake; & 650,000 Angkola a&nd Mandailing between the Toba & the Minangkabau. " [NOTE: These are tribal/cultural (NOT religious) stats.]
Daju Chad - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Dakota Canada 2,500 - - - 1970 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 39. "Dakota Sioux... In 1970, they numbered 2,500 in Canada and 52,000 in the United States. "
Dakota North America 25,000 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 39. "The population of the Dakota Sioux was estimated at 25,000 in 1780. "
Dakota North America - - - - 1850 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 39. "Dakota Sioux... Chased by the Cree from the Mississippi springs region in the seventeenth century, by the beginning of the nineteenth century, the Dokota occupied a vast territory embracing most of present-day South Dakota and parts of North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, Nebraska, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. "
Dakota North America 54,500 - - - 1970 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 39. "Dakota Sioux... In 1970, they numbered 2,500 in Canada and 52,000 in the United States. "
Dakota North America - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 148, 150. "Dakota and Lakota: Alternate names: Sioux; Location: United States (North & South Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, Montana); Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba); Population: 103,000; Religion: Traditional "; Pg. 150: "Lakota & Dakota continue to rely upon a variety of healers... In the 19t century some Dakota & Lakota became Christian... Today both group have a deeper respect for traditional religion. Some Dakota & Lakota follow what are called the traditional ways, while others belong to one Christian denomination or another, & some, as in the past, pray in both groups. The majority of Lakota & Dakota today hold that all religions seek to contact the same God... Some... belong to the Native American Church. "
Dakota North America - Northern Great Plains 25,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Dakota USA 52,000 - - - 1970 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 39. "Dakota Sioux... In 1970, they numbered 2,500 in Canada and 52,000 in the United States. Their reservations are located in Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, and especially in North and South Dakota on the reservations of Pine Ridge, Rosebud, and Standing Rock. "
Dakota world 25,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Dakshinamargis India - - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 24. "Besides the major Hindu sects of Vishnu and Shiva, there are many minor ones. The strongest, in numbers and influence, is... of Shakti whose followers worship 'God in the aspect of mother.'... divided into two main groups, the Dakshinamargis, or followers of the right-hand way, and Vamamargis, or left-handed worshipers. The first take the usual path of renunciation of the world, the second the unusual path toward enjoyment of life. The Dakshinamargis do openly what they profess, the Vamamargis keep their rituals secret. "
Dakshinamargis India - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 53-54. "In Shaktism or Tantrism... Some of these texts relate esoteric practices divided into Vamachara, or left-handed path, and Dakshinachara, or right-handed path... "
Dakubetede North America - Pacific Coast 3,200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Umpqua
Dakubetede world 3,200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Umpqua
Damara Namibia - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Damascus Christian Church world 1,000 - 10
units
2
countries
1962 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Spanish-Speaking Pentecostals; pg. 280. "Damascus Christian Church... Bronx, NY [H.Q.]... is a small Pentecostal body formed in 1939. It grew out of the work of Francisco Rosada and his wife Leoncai Rosada in New York City. By 1962 it had spread to New Jersey, with foreign affiliated congregations in Cuba and the Virgin Islands... Membership: Not reported. In 1962 the Church had 10 congregations and approx. 1,000 members. "
Dan Cote d'Ivoire - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures


Dan, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.