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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

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Council for World Mission, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Council for World Mission Guyana 2,452 0.30% 38
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Guyana Congregational Union (GCU) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Guyana Congregational Union (GCU)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 825,000... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 2,452/38. " [GCU is the only Council for World Missions church in Guyana]
Council for World Mission Hong Kong 26,092 0.44% 48
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Hong Kong Council of the Church of Christ in China (HKCCCC) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Hong Kong Council of the Church of Christ in China (HKCCCC)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 5.9 million... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 26,092/48. " [HKCCCC is the only Council for World Missions church in Hong Kong]
Council for World Mission India 4,748,456 - 15,768
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Churches " (viewed 31 May 1999). Added up memberships of constituent member bodies in India: Church of North India, Church of South India, and Presbyterian Church of India. "
Council for World Mission Kiribati 29,432 37.90% 129
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Kiribati/Kiribati Protestant Church (KPC) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Kiribati Protestant Church (KPC)... Country information: Population: 77,658... Main religions: Christianity (95%)... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 29,432/129. " [KPC is the only Council for World Missions church in Kiribati]
Council for World Mission Korea, South 2,094,338 4.70% 5,584
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Presbyterian Church of Korea (PCK) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Presbyterian Church of Korea (PCK)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 44.6 million... Church information:.. Members/Congregations: 2,094,338/5,584. " [PCK is the only Council for World Missions church in Korea]
Council for World Mission Madagascar 2,000,000 13.99% 4,000
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Madagascar " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Church of Jesus Christ in Madagascar (FJKM)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 14.3 million... Members/Congregations: 2 million/4,000... " [FJKM is the only Council for World Missions church in Madagascar]
Council for World Mission Malawi 20,000 0.19% 45
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Malawi " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Churches of Christ in Malawi (CCM)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 10.8 million... Members/Congregations: 20,000/45. " [CCM is the only Council for World Missions church in Malawi]
Council for World Mission Malaysia 8,000 0.04% - - 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Gereja Presbyterian Malaysia (GPM) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Gereja Presbyterian Malaysia (GPM)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 19.7 million... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 8,000 members. " [GPM is the only Council for World Missions church in Malaysia]
Council for World Mission Myanmar 29,500 0.06% 230
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Presbyterian Church of Myanmar (PCM) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Presbyterian Church of Myanmar (PCM)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 45.6 million... Members/Congregations: 29,500/230. " [PCM is the only Council for World Missions church in Myanmar]
Council for World Mission Nauru - - 7
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Nauru/Nauru Congregational Church (NCC) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Nauru Congregational Church (NCC)... Country information: Population: 9,400... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 7 district churches. " [NCC is the only Council for World Missions church in Nauru]
Council for World Mission Netherlands 700,000 4.55% 860
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Reformed Churches in the Netherlands (RCN) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Reformed Churches in the Netherlands (RCN)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 15.4 million... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 700,000/860. " [RCN is the only Council for World Missions church in the Netherlands]
Council for World Mission New Zealand 54,796 1.52% 455
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Churches " (viewed 31 May 1999). Added up memberships of constituent member bodies in New Zealand: Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand (PCANZ) and Congregational Union of New Zealand (CUNZ) "
Council for World Mission Oceania 850,943 - 3,780
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Churches " (viewed 31 May 1999). Added up memberships of constituent member bodies in region: Ekalesia Kelisiano Tuvalu, United Church in the Solomon Islands, Congregational Christian Church in Samoa, United Church in Papua New Guinea, Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand (PCANZ), Congregational Union of New Zealand (CUNZ), Nauru Congregational Church, Nauru Congregational Church and Congregational Christian Church in American Samoa. [The membership figure (850,943 members) doesn't include the unspecified membership for Nauru, but that's only 7 congregations.]
Council for World Mission Papua New Guinea 600,000 14.29% 2,600
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Papua New Guinea/United Church in Papua New Guinea (UCPNG) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "United Church in Papua New Guinea (UCPNG)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 4.2 million... Church information... Members/Congregations: 600,000/2,600. " [UCPNG is the only Council for World Missions church in Papua New Guinea]
Council for World Mission Samoa 68,000 40.24% 268
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Samoa/Congregational Christian Church in Samoa (CCCS) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Congregational Christian Church in Samoa (CCCS)... Country information: Population: 169,000... Main religions: Christianity (95%)... Church information... Members/Congregations: 68,000/268. " [This org. is distinct from the CCCAS in American Samoa.]; [CCCS is the only Council for World Missions church in Western Samoa]
Council for World Mission Singapore 10,000 0.36% 40
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Presbyterian Church in Singapore (PCS) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Presbyterian Church in Singapore (PCS)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 2.8 million... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 10,000/40. " [PCS is the only Council for World Missions church in Singapore]
Council for World Mission Solomon Islands 50,000 13.66% 191
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Solomon Islands/United Church in the Solomon Islands (UCSI). " (viewed 31 May 1999). "United Church in the Solomon Islands (UCSI)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 366,000... Church information... Members/Congregations: 50,000/191. " [UCSI is the only Council for World Missions church in the Solomon Islands]
Council for World Mission Taiwan 220,000 1.05% 1,183
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Presbyterian Church in Taiwan (PCT) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Presbyterian Church in Taiwan (PCT)... Country information: Population: 21 million... Church information:... Members/Congregations: 220,000/1,183. " [PCT is the only Council for World Missions church in Taiwan]
Council for World Mission Tuvalu 9,715 94.35% 13
units
- 1997 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Tuvalu/Ekalesia Kelisiano Tuvalu (EKT) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Ekalesia Kelisiano Tuvalu (EKT)... Country information: Population: 10,297 (July 1997).. Main religions: Christianity (95%)... Church information... Members/Congregations: 9,715/13. " [EKT is the only Council for World Missions church in Tuvalu]
Council for World Mission United Kingdom 214,843 - 3,629
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Churches " (viewed 31 May 1999). Added up memberships of constituent member bodies in region: Union of Welsh Independents, Presbyterian Church of Wales, United Reformed Church in the United Kingdom, Congregational Federation, Congregational Union of Scotland.
Council for World Mission world 13,026,624 - 36,186
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Churches " (viewed 31 May 1999). Added up memberships of all 32 constituent member bodies from around the world, as listed on individual web pages linked to this index.
Council of African Instituted Churches South Africa - - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: National Council of Churches of Christ in the U.S.A.; web page: news release represents a modest edit of the wrap-up prepared by the World Council of Churches (1998). Viewed 7 Oct. 1999. "Membership of the WCC rose to a record 339 churches as the Assembly welcomed eight more... six of the new churches are African: the United Church of Christ in Zimbabwe, the Harrist Church in Ivory Coast, the Council of African Instituted Churches, which is in South Africa... "
Council of Baptist Churches in Northern India India 70,000 - 470
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Council of Mosques of the United States USA - - 1,000
units
- 1992 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992); pg. 184. "Lawud Assad, president of the Council of Mosques of the United States, says there are more than 1,000 Muslim community organizations in his group alone, some worshiping in basements and other makeshift places. "
Council of the Blue Moon USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 74-75. "Council of the Blue Moon, Railt, P.O. Box 27465, San Antonio, TX 78227. Eclectic tending toward Dianic; publishes SheTotem, a womyn's magic newsletter; runs a lending library, and consider themselves service-minded to the Pagan community; womyn only. "
Council of the Magickal Arts USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 75. "Council of the Magickal Arts, Judy Carusone, 9707 Chatfield St., Houston, TX 77025... Comprised of groups and individuals who meet at Beltane and Samhain to celebrate the Godd/ess in Light and Love; quarterly newsletter... "
Country & Town Baptist Church Pennsylvania 2,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Mechanicsburg, PA; pastor Charles Teague.
Course in Miracles, A USA - - 300
units
- 1986 Newport, John P. The New Age Movement and the Biblical Worldview: Conflict and Dialogue, William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan (1998); pg. 176. "After only ten years in circulation, the Course was being studied by more than three hundred groups formally organized for that purpose, in both rural and urban America. "
Course in Miracles, A Utah: Salt Lake City - - - - 2000 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher. "Who Owns the Words of Jesus?: Copyright holders protecting draft of book, but followers claim unedited version is voice of Christ " in Salt Lake Tribune (19 Feb 2000) "For nearly two decades, the Rev. Brian Eenigenburg has been a devotee of A Course in Miracles, the three-volume work believed to be the words of Jesus dictated from heaven to New York psychologist Helen Schucman in the 1960s and '70s. Imagine Eenigenburg's delight in mid-January when he and hundreds of others received an e-mail of an earlier, 'unedited' version of the work, which included statements and ideas omitted from the official version. It's akin to a Christian finding the Dead Sea Scrolls, Eenigenburg told the members of his 10-member Holy Instant Christian Church in Salt Lake City... In Salt Lake City, the Course has many followers among New Agers and in more traditional groups, Eenigenburg said. "
Course in Miracles, A world - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 280-281. "Most agree that the New Age has its roots in the human potential movement and that it has to do with a complex awareness--of the oneness of creation, the limitless potential of humanity, and the possibility of transforming the self and today's world into a better one.

Then again, it is easy to find a different voice. The true goal, says Ken Eyeer, head of the Northwest Foundation, whcih conducts 'A Course in Miracles,' 'is not to change the world, but to change yourself.' "

Course in Miracles, A world - - 1,000
units
- 1992 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 242. "...A Course in Miracles. This book is the centerpiece of more than 1,000 study groups based on its introspective program (Smilgis, 1991) "
Course in Miracles, A world - - - - 2000 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher. "Who Owns the Words of Jesus?: Copyright holders protecting draft of book, but followers claim unedited version is voice of Christ " in Salt Lake Tribune (19 Feb 2000) "Schucman gave the copyright to the Foundation, but did not want to be officially involved, Wapnick said. She died in 1981. Since then, A Course in Miracles, has won global interest and diverse readership, including talk show diva Opray Winfrey and Marianne Williamson, writer/producer of 'Touched by an Angel.' More than 1.3 million copies of the Course have been sold... But even as the book's popularity has risen, the Foundation for Inner Peace (which recently changed its name to Foundation for A Course in Miracles) has tightened its control of the work. "
Covenant USA 16,000 - - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 15-17. Table 1-2: Self-Described Adherence of U.S. Adult Population 1990. Phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by Graduate School of City U. of New York.
Covenant of the Goddess USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 75. "Covenant of the Goddess (COG), P.O. Box 1226, Berkeley, CA 94704. National confederation of Wiccan covens of various traditions (Gardnerian, Dianic, Celtic, Eclectic, Kingstone, NROOGD, Tanic, etc.); COG has Local Councils in various prts of the country... "
Covenant of the Goddess USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 92. "The Covenant of the Goddess (COG) is a coalition of individual covens which include both women and men... COG was incorporated in California in 1975 as a non-profit religious organization... Membership... is 'open to established Goddess-worshipping Craft covens [and individuals] of all traditions...' considers itself a national confederation of covens and solitaries... Several feminist groups, including the Susan B. Anthony Coven #1.. are part of COG... "
Covenant of the Goddess USA - - 80
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 339. "Although only a small minority of all the covens in America (80 out of an estimated several thousand) are members, it is, nevertheless, the largest organization serving this purpose at present. "
Covenant of the Goddess USA - - - - 1999 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 111. "CoG, a loosely organized national federation of covens, is one avanue through which information is spread within the Neo-Pagan community. It has a newsletter, a yearly national meeting, and local chapters. CoG aids covens in becoming recognized churches, with tax exempt status and the right to perform legally binding marriages; it also provides a network of covens that exchange information. "
Covenant of Unitarian Universalist Pagans USA - - 60
units
- 1990 Newport, John P. The New Age Movement and the Biblical Worldview: Conflict and Dialogue, William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan (1998); pg. 237. "...a forum for interested people to meet and explore pagan ritual within the Unitarian Church. In 1990 there were sixty chapters throughout the United States. "
Covenant of Unitarian Universalist Pagans USA 700 - - - 1999 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 100, 114-115. Pg. 100: "...the Unitarian Universalist Association Neo-Pagan group, Covenant of the Unitarian Universalist Pagans (CUUPs). "; Pg. 114: "The development of CUUPs and the increase of Neo-Pagans who are joining the UUA are indicative of Neo-Pagans' search for legitimacy and consistency... CUUPs was founded in 1987 as an independent affiliate organization of the UUA by the Reverent Lesley Phillips, Linda Pinti... Membership increased by leaps and bounds... Men began to join too... CUUPs reorganized in 1996 with a new board of directors. The organization continues to gain new membership... There are nearly 700 active members of CUUPs, and a larger number of associate members who receive a newsletter, but whose names are not on the membership list and who cannot vote. "
Covenant of Unitarian Universalist Pagans USA - - - - 1999 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 115. "It is impossible to determine the exact number of Neo-Pagans who are members of the UUA. There are nearly 700 active members of CUUPs, & a larger number of associate members who receive a newsletter, but whose names are not on the membership list & who cannot vote. In a telephone interview Jerrie Hildebrand, the CUUPs public relations rep., stated that some Neo-Pagans become associate members because they do not want their names on the membership list, which is public. They fear the negative repercussions of openly defining themselves as Neo-Pagans. Other Neo-Pagans have joined the Unitarian Universalist Association but have not become members of CUUPs... Although the number of Neo-Pagans within the UUA is a small percentage of all Unitarian Universalists & also of all Neo-Pagans, the development of CUUPs is significant. "
Covenant of Unitarian Universalist Pagans USA - - - - 1999 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 119. "The small number of Neo-Pagans who have joined the Unitarian Universalists have already had an impact on the organization--through the addition of earth-based religions as one of the sources of inspiration, changes in religious education programs, & the employment of Unitarian Universalist Neo-Pagan ministers. To date only one Unitarian Universalist congregation was completely Neo-Pagan focused; & it is no longer in existence. There is concern within the association that Neo-Paganism not become a religion within a religious affiliation. To the degree that Wicca becomes subsumed under the auspices of the UUA it will be changed dramatically, as the CUUPs members & other Neo-Pagans join in worship and fellowship with other Unitarian Universalists and become part of their pluralism. "
Covenant, the Sword, and the Arm of the Lord Missouri - - - - 1971 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 61-62. "Founded in 1971, the Covenant, the Sword, and the Arm of The Lord (CSA) is another violent white-supremacist group whose activities have been curtailed by effective law enforcement. Operating for the most part out of a secluded communal settlement locaed on 224 acres of land near the Arkansas-Missouri border, the men, women, and children that constituted its following at its peak believed that America was near collapse and would eventually be engaged in a disastrous race war... CSA's Identity Church [Christian Identity] doctrine teaches that... "
Covenant, the Sword, and the Arm of the Lord USA 100 - - - 1985 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 77-78. "The Covenant, the Sword and the Arm of the Lord (CSA), based on a 224-acre spread near the Arkansas-Missouri border. CSA is [a Christian] Identity church, but also a far-right survivalist paramilitary group that was home to more than one hundred followers before a police raid in 1985... Many members are now in prison. "
Covenanters United Kingdom: Scotland - - - - 1638 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 197. "Covenanters. Presbyterians in Scotland were frequently called Covenanters from the sixteenth century on because of their proclivity to support their convictions by signing covenants, the most notable of which (1638) resisted the effort to impose a service book and Episcopal polity. After the restoration in 1660 the title was applied to the most determined resisters to Episcopacy, many of whom suffered death for their cause. "
Covenanters United Kingdom: Scotland - - - - 1800 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "COVENANTERS: Scottish PROTESTANTS who resisted the imposition of EPISCOPAL forms of CHURCH government on the Scottish Church by Charles I by signing a National COVENANT to maintain PROTESTANT forms of WORSHIP in Scotland. This action was important in terms of its influence on the development of DEMOCRACY and the American REVOLUTION. "
Cree Manitoba 10,000 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 88. "Cree... There are about 10,000 today in Manitoba, and 5,000 in Northern Territories "
Cree North America 15,000 - - - 1776 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 88. "Cree... Numbered at 15,000 in 1776... "
Cree North America 2,500 - - - 1850 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 88. "Cree... Numbered at 15,000 in 1776, their population was severely decimated by smallpox and fell to 2,500 in the nineteenth century. "
Cree North America 15,000 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 88. "Cree... There are about 10,000 today in Manitoba, and 5,000 in Northern Territories "
Cree Northwest Territories 5,000 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 88. "Cree... There are about 10,000 today in Manitoba, and 5,000 in Northern Territories "
Cree USA 8,290 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Cree USA 8,290 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Cree - Plains North America 4,000 - - - 1850 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 37. "Plains Cree... Their population was estimated at 4,000 in the middle of the 19th century. Their descendants joined the Forest Cree on their reservation or intermarried with other tribes. "
Creek North America 20,000 - - - 1700 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 10. "There were about 20,000 Creek at the beginning of the eighteenth century. "
Creek North America - Southeastern Woodlands 22,500 - - - 1700 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Creek Confed. (1700): 22,500 "
Creek USA 43,550 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Creek USA 43,550 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Creek USA 40,000 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 10. "They inhabit present-day Georgia and Alabama... There were about 20,000 Creek at the beginning of the eighteenth century. Today, they have numerous descendants (12,000-40,000), who live mainly on reservations in Oklahoma. "
Creek USA 44,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 127-129. "Creeks: Alternate Names: Muskogee; Location: United States (Oklahoma; Alabama; Georgia; Florida; California; Texas); Population: Approximately 44,000; Religion: Traditional Creek; Muskogee (Creek) Protestant "; "The Creeks, like many other Southeastern tribes, are a highly religious and highly ceremonial people... [Creek] traditions are caried on today by the Traditional Ceremonial people of the Creeks. A large percentage of Creeks have been converted to Christianity, and there are many Muskogee (Creek) Protestant churches in the Muskogee (Creek) Nation. Services are conducted in both English and the Muskogee language. " [NOTE: Statistic of of tribal affiliation, not a count of those practicing traditional Creek religion]
Creek world 22,500 - - - 1700 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Creek Confed. (1700): 22,500 "
Crenshaw Christian Center California 16,000 - 1
unit
- 1990 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992). [Orig. source: "Update on Action in American Churches, " Religion & Democracy, Nov. 1990, pg. 6]; pg. 177-178. "The largest church sanctuary in U.S. is owned by the Crenshaw Christian Center, a mostly black congregation in [L.A.] With a seating capacity of 10,400, a campus of 32 acres, and a constituency said to top 16,000... "
Crenshaw Christian Center California: Los Angeles 6,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table, grouped by state, columns for city, state, "size " (avg. weekly attendance), etc. From study finding all U.S. megachurches (congreg. w/ "consistent weekly attendance of at least 2,000 persons "); an independent in L.A., pastor Fred Price.
Crenshaw Christian Center USA 16,000 - 1
unit
- 1990 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992). [Orig. source: "Update on Action in American Churches, " Religion & Democracy, Nov. 1990, pg. 6]; pg. 177-178. "The largest church sanctuary in U.S. is owned by the Crenshaw Christian Center, a mostly black congregation in [L.A.] With a seating capacity of 10,400, a campus of 32 acres, and a constituency said to top 16,000... "
Crenshaw Christian Center world 16,000 - 1
unit
1
country
1990 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992). [Orig. source: "Update on Action in American Churches, " Religion & Democracy, Nov. 1990, pg. 6]; pg. 177-178. "The largest church sanctuary in U.S. is owned by the Crenshaw Christian Center, a mostly black congregation in [L.A.] With a seating capacity of 10,400, a campus of 32 acres, and a constituency said to top 16,000... "
Creole Belize 69,048 30.00% - - 1998 *LINK* CIA World Factbook 1998 (viewed June 24, 1999) "Population: 230,160 (July 1998 est.)... Ethnic groups: mestizo 44%, Creole 30%, Maya 11%, Garifuna 7%, other 8% "


Creole, continued

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