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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Amish - other, Pennsylvania: Lancaster County

Amish - other, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Amish - other Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 1,000 0.25% - - 1989 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 10. "Nearly 86 percent of the Amish in Lancaster County are affiliated with the Old Order Amish, sometimes called House Amish... At least six varieties of more progressive Amish (some of whom use electricity and own automobiles) number nearly one thousand members. These groups splintered off in progressive directions over the past 75 years, leaving the Old Order Amish as the sole guardians of traditional Amish culture. "
Amish - other Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - - - - 1989 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 22. "The three division--1877, 1910, and 1966--are crucial benchmarks in Amish history. Memories of the schisms, alive in the minds of leaders, function as turning points in Amish oral history. The residual effects of these schisms touch the decision-making process in the Amish community even today. The three divisions released progressive social steam in periods of rapid changes as the Amish church grappled with technological innovations. Interestingly, there have been no conservative or reform divisions within the Old Order Amish community.

In retrospect, the expulsion of the dissidents served useful social functions over the years. The offshoots of 1877, 1910, and 1966 provide negative examples for the Old Order Amish--demonstrations of the corrosive effects of wordliness. Through their ownership of cars and use of electricity, the liberal groups have displayed the folly of worldliness to several generations of young Amish. "

Amway world 14,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (viewed 1998) [Orig. source: Information from Amway's Homepage. www.amway.com] Called a "Para-Religion " in article on university "New Religious Movements " web site.
Ana Togo - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Anaak Ethiopia - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Anaak Sudan - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Anaak world - - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; "Sudan, Ethiopia "
Anabaptist Europe - - - - 1550 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 28. "Anabaptists: A term applied broadly to a number of sixteenth century religious groups that regarded infant baptism as invalid and required those who had received it to be 'rebaptized.' The movement has also been called the 'Radical Reformation' and 'Left Wing of the Reformation.' The presence of revolutionaries among them marked all radicals as potentially dangerous to the state, and gave impetus to the persecution of Anabaptists by Lutheran, Reformed, and Roman Catholic authorities... there is no one set of accepted Anabaptist beliefs... The Mennonites, founded by Menno Simons (1494?-1561), are the largest surviving Anabaptist group. "
Anabaptist Europe - - - - 1600 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 346. "Anabaptists. Their collective name means 'rebaptizer,' although they rejected the title since they disavowed infant baptism and didn't consider their own early baptisms effectual at all. They believed instead in voluntary adult baptism by their peers... The movement rose in Zurich in the 1520s and spread across German-speaking Europe before splitting into opposing factions. The Anabaptists were persecuted and many thousands slain not only by Rome but also by fellow Protestants who found their reductive radicalism threatening. "
Anabaptist Germany - - - - 1515 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "ANABAPTISTS: a collective name for a number of sectarian PROTESTANT GROUPS originating in Germany in the early years of the sixteenth century. "
Anabaptist Netherlands - - - - 1561 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 608. "Persecuted by other Protestants and by Roman Catholics, Anabaptists became a movement of some size chiefly n the Netherlands, under the leadership of Menno Simons (ca. 1492/6 - ca. 1559/61), and in Moravia, where Jakob Hutter (d. 1536) organized Anabaptist communities. "
Anabaptist world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 28. "The Mennonites, founded by Menno Simons (1494?-1561), are the largest surviving Anabaptist group. "
Ananaikyo Japan 201,360 0.17% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Shinto new religion (year of origin: 1949).
Ananaikyo Japan - - - - 1996 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 5. "Ananai-kyo: 'The teaching (kyo) of the three (ana) and the five (nai)'. A messianic Shinto group founded in 1949 by Nakano, Yonosuke (b. 1887)... teaches a yogic-type practice of chinkon kishin... It has an ecumenical approach to other religions. The 'three' in the group's title refers to the teachings of (1) chinkon kishun (2) the form of Taoism taught in the 'red swastika' movement in Manchuria associated with Deguchi, Onisaburo... and (3) the Baha'i Faith. The 'five' refers to the traditions of Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Islam, and Taoism from which Ananai-kyo draws inspiration. "
Ananda Community California - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 320. "One of Yogananda's disciples, Swami Kriyananda (b. Donald Walters, 1926), broke from the Self-Realization Fellowship and established a separate commune, the Ananda Community, in the California foothills of the Sierra mountains. "
Ananda Community world 300 - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "ANANDA COMMUNITY: founded in 1968 by an American, J. Donald Walters, who called himself SWAMI Kriyananda. This is one of the more successful NEW AGE type communities to have developed out of the 1960s COUNTER CULTURE. The community has around 300 members and finds its inspiration in the work of Swami Paramahansa Yogananda. "
Ananda Marga Australia 500 - 18
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Ananda Marga... arrived in Australia in 1972, and now has 18 centres across the country with an estimated 500 members "
Ananda Marga Germany 200 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Ananda Marga " in table. Source: REMID.
Ananda Marga Germany, West 600 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10-14. "Another more detailed assessment for West Germany covering many more movements concludes that well over one million people are involved or 'influenced' by new religions, with a 'full-time' membership of 64,200. The estimated full time membership for 12 of these movements is: " [table]
Ananda Marga India 2,500,000 - - 30
countries
1998 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: WORLD CHRISTIAN ENCYCLOPEDIA -- edited by David B. Barrett); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Hinduism:Ananda Marga:
"Ananda Marga claims 2.5 million converts in India and a network of branches in 30 countries abroad. "
Ananda Marga India: Bihar - - - - 1955 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Ananda Marga is an international spiritual and social service organisation active in more than 120 countries around the world. The movement traces its origins back more than 7000 years to a highly esoteric school of Indian philosophy. The movement originated in Jamalpur, Bihar State in India in 1955, when it was founded by Prabhat Rainjan Sarkar, also known by the spiritual name Shrii Shrii Anandamurti. Shrii Shrii Anandamurti is referred to by members of Ananda Marga as 'Baba' which means 'Most Beloved'. Ananda Marga, the organisation's name given by Sarkar, is Sanskrit for 'Path of Bliss'... Initially, Ananda Marga was active solely in the teaching of yoga, meditation and spiritual philosophy. "
Ananda Marga world 3,000 - - - 1973 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (viewed 1998) Hinduism:Yoga:
"Membership: Not recorded. In 1973, Sarkar had established 100 centers which boasted 3000 members. "
Ananda Marga world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 319. "...Ananda Marg... has had one of the largest Western followings [among Hindu groups]. After the movement founded a political party in Bihar and allegedly... Subsequently the movement fragmented, lost most of its mass appeal... "
Ananda Marga world - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "new sects and movements in Hinduism both in India and the West, for example, the Sri Aurobindo Ashram, the Theosophical Society, Arya Samaj, Brahmo Samaj, Ananda Marga, Transcendental Meditation... "
Ananda Marga world 250,000 - 1,500
units
120
countries
1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "So far, 65 religious groups and associations have completed a questionnaire and are listed below... Ananda Marga is an international spiritual and social service organisation active in more than 120 countries around the world... approximately 1500 centres worldwide, with an estimated 250,000 plus membership... Today the organisation operates over 2000 children's schools, orphanages, disaster relief, medical and community development projects all over the world. The projects of Ananda Marga are funded by public contributions, other charitable and religious organisations, and by national governments including Australia, Canada, the United States and several countries of Western and eastern Europe. "
Ananites world - - - - 750 C.E. *LINK* web site: "Karaite Korner "; web page: "History of Karaism " (viewed 14 March 1999). Copyright 1998-1999 by Nehemia Gordon and Devorah Gordon. "in the 8th century... Anan ben David... organized various anti-Talmudic elements & lobbied the Caliphate to establish a 2nd Exilarchate for those who rejected the Talmud. The Muslims granted Anan & his followers the religious freedom to practice Judaism in their own way. Anan gathered a large following... his followers became known as the Ananites. Some time after Anan's death his followers merged with other anti-Talmudic groups and took on the name 'Followers of the Bible' ('Bnei Mikra'), [later] abbreviated into 'Karaim'... "
ancestor veneration Asia - Southeast - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 710. "In many tribal religions [of Southeast Asia] ancestor veneration is widely practices, and in some, several types of ancestral spirits are distinguished. "
ancestor veneration Australia 653 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "Ancestor Veneration "]
ancestor veneration China - 100.00% - - 1663 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 181. "The ancestor cult was universal in China; it has been called that country's only national religion. Every family had an ancestral hall filled with wooden spirit-tablets representing dead ancestors... Although China's uneducated masses took the ancestral cult literally... the Chinese literati [including Chinese Jews] considered ancestor worship a secular ceremony... Its purpose was to channel the natural emotions, and bind together the family. "
ancestor veneration China - - - - 1972 Kinmond, William. The First Book of Communist China. New York: Franklin Watts (1972, revised edition); pg. 74-75. "Ancestor worship, however, is unlike most religions in that it has no established doctrine. Neither does it have rules of right and wrong. The Chinese worship their ancestors somewhat in the way we revere a national hero. Even the ritual is limited to sacrifices made periodically during festivals and on anniversaries of birth and death. Some people also pay homage to the dead at the beginning and in the middle of each month. In many Chinese homes today there is a little altar to the ancestors... Many Chinese still persist in many of the superstitious beliefs... The spread of communism has eliminated superstitious beliefs to a large degree, but the lives of many Chinese, especially the peasants, are governed from beginning to end by their belief in spirits. "
ancestor veneration China - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 42. "Originally, ancestor worship had been exclusive to the king. Only later did peasants too begin to honor their ancestors... About 2,000 years ago, genealogical tables were introduced as homes for the soul during sacrificial acts... Even today, the Chinese worship their ancestors and offer the deities sacrifices of food. This is widely practised, for example, during the Qingming Festival. "
ancestor veneration Japan - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 281. "...this animism, mixed with ancestor worship -- a shared trait with Buddhism -- that characterizes Shinto... As for ancestor worship, the Yamato 'race' always believed that it had descended from heaven, and so worshipped Amaterasu Omikami -- the sun goddess, she who ruled the heavens -- as the ancestress of the imperial family, if not all the people. "
ancestor veneration Korea, South - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 210. "Ancestor worship continues to be practised much as it has been for more than 1,000 years. "
ancestor veneration Taiwan - - - - 1996 *LINK* web page: "Religions in Taiwan " (Written by Miss C.Y.Li, 1996, TSA); (viewed 4 July 1999). "[in addition to] religious Taoism and Buddhism, Taiwanese society is also dominated by ancestor worship. Most families set the lighted shrine at home and worship their ancestors or deity heroes with a burning incense daily. The ancestral worship is as a filial duty. "
ancestor veneration Uganda - - - - 1999 Creed, Alexander. Uganda ( "Major World Nations " book series). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 58. "Some tribespeople believe in the ancestral cult, which holds that dead ancestors have the power to shape everyday lives... "
ancestor veneration world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 30. "Ancestor veneration. The ritual homage and placation of the spirits of the dead by their living descendants. Its ideology holds that ancestors are dependent upon such attention for sustenance and often for continued existence... Systems of ancestor veneration are best known from Africa, China, Taiwan, and Japan. In all cases ancestral cults are embedded in broader religious systems. "
Anchor Bay Evangelistic Association world - - 115
units
- 1968 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 243. Church reporting.
Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite world 300,000 - - - 1992 Edighoffer, Roland. "Rosicrucianism: From the Seventeenth to the Twentieth Century " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992); pg. 207. "The Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite today unites hundreds of thousands of freemasons around the world; it is one masonic rite among others, practiced in numerous jurisdictions, including that of the Grand Orient in France... "
Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis Australia 1,582 - 14
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Rosicrucian Order Amorc... It arrived in Australia in 1928... In Australia, there are 14 centres for exactly 1582 members. "
Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis Canada - - 44
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 307. "The Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis... AMORC is composed of 163 chartered groups in the U.S., 44 in Canada, and another 85 groups worldwide. "
Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis USA - - 163
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 307. "The Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis... AMORC is composed of 163 chartered groups in the U.S., 44 in Canada, and another 85 groups worldwide. "
Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 631. "Modern groups using the name and heritage of Rosicrucianism have appeared; the best known is the Ancient and Mystical Order Rosae Crucis (AMORC) founded in 1915 by the American H. Spencer Lewis, with headquarters in California; it advertises its courses widely. "
Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis world - - 292
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 307. "Fraternitas Rosae Crucis challenged propriety of AMORC's [use of] 'Rosicrucian.'... The Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis... AMORC is composed of 163 chartered groups in the U.S., 44 in Canada, and another 85 groups worldwide. "
Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis world - - - - 1992 Edighoffer, Roland. "Rosicrucianism: From the Seventeenth to the Twentieth Century " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992); pg. 208. "It was also in France, in Toulouse, that an American, Dr. H. Spencer Lewis (1883-1939), had a vision directing him to give renewed life from the United States to the Rosicrucian fraternity. The Anticus Mysticusque Ordo Rosae Crucis, founded in 1909, has its seat in California. Better known under the acronym AMORC, it remains today the source of an important activity in America and Europe. "
Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "AMORC: the Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis which was founded in 1915... now based in California and has scattered groups throughout the world. It has tremendous influence in promoting NEW AGE type ideas in places like Africa? "
Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis world 250,000 - 1,500
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Rosicrucian Order Amorc: This order is a non-sectarian fraternal body of men and women devoted to the investigation, study and practical application of natural and spiritual laws. Its purpose is to enable everyone to live in harmony with the creative, constructive cosmic forces for the attainment of health, happiness and peace. It was founded in 1915 in New York by Dr. Spencer Lewis and draws its inspiration from the 17th century European Rosicrucian works by Christian Rosenkreuz... Worldwide, the order has approximately 1500 centres for an estimated 250,000 members. "
Ancient Church of the East Australia 1,126 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "Ancient Church of the East ", distinct from the "Assyrian Church of the East "]
Ancient Tridentine Catholic Church California - - 4
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 68. "Membership: IN 1988 the church reported about 120 families in its seven active parishes in San Francisco, Daly City, Yuba City, and Monterey, California; Silver Cliff, Colorado; and Merida, Mexico. "
Ancient Tridentine Catholic Church California: San Francisco - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 68. "Membership: IN 1988 the church reported about 120 families in its seven active parishes in San Francisco, Daly City, Yuba City, and Monterey, California; Silver Cliff, Colorado; and Merida, Mexico. "
Ancient Tridentine Catholic Church Colorado - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 68. "Membership: IN 1988 the church reported about 120 families in its seven active parishes in San Francisco, Daly City, Yuba City, and Monterey, California; Silver Cliff, Colorado; and Merida, Mexico. "
Ancient Tridentine Catholic Church Mexico - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 68. "Membership: IN 1988 the church reported about 120 families in its seven active parishes in San Francisco, Daly City, Yuba City, and Monterey, California; Silver Cliff, Colorado; and Merida, Mexico. "
Ancient Tridentine Catholic Church USA - - 6
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 68. "Membership: IN 1988 the church reported about 120 families in its seven active parishes in San Francisco, Daly City, Yuba City, and Monterey, California; Silver Cliff, Colorado; and Merida, Mexico. "
Ancient Tridentine Catholic Church world 360 - 7
units
2
countries
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 68. "Membership: IN 1988 the church reported about 120 families in its seven active parishes in San Francisco, Daly City, Yuba City, and Monterey, California; Silver Cliff, Colorado; and Merida, Mexico. "
Andamanese India: Andaman - - - - 1250 C.E. Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 83. "The 13th-century explorer Marcos Polo, for instance, recorded in accounts of his travels a story he heard of the 'dog-headed' inhabitants of the islands. More recently, in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Sign of Four, an Andaman Islander appears as a villain, complete with 'murderous darts' and a 'face [that] was enough to give a man a sleepless night.' "
Andamanese India: Andaman 5,000 - - - 1850 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 83. "The number of Andaman Islanders have dropped precipitously over the past two centuries, down from an estimated average of 5,000 islanders living throughout the archipelago in the middle of the 19th century. "
Andamanese India: Andaman 269 - - - 1983 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 35. "Andamanese: Alternate Names: Jarawas, Onge, Sentinelese; Location: India (Andaman Islands); Population: 269; Language: Andamanese; Religion: Animism "; "The Andamanese are the original inhabitants of the Andaman Islands... Of Negrito (Asian pygmy) stock, this population consists of hunting-and-gathering tribes... The total tribal population of the Andaman Islands was estimated to be 269 in 1983. "
Andamanese India: Andaman 500 - - - 1999 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 83. "Between 450 and 500 indigenous people still live on the islands, the last representatives of the dwindling population of Negrito people in south Asia. The Andaman Islanders followed the traditional way of life of these people--one of seminomadic hunter-gatherer-fishers--well into the 19th century, when Brisih colonists arrived and began to take over the islands. Despite intrusions, however, some islanders have managed to hold on to many of their traditional customs. "
Andamanese world 269 - - 1
country
1983 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 35. "Andamanese: Alternate Names: Jarawas, Onge, Sentinelese; Location: India (Andaman Islands); Population: 269; Language: Andamanese; Religion: Animism "; "The Andamanese are the original inhabitants of the Andaman Islands... Of Negrito (Asian pgymy) stock, this population consists of hunting-and-gathering tribes... The total tribal population of the Andaman Islands was estimated to be 269 in 1983. "
Andes Evangelical Mission South America - - - - 1982 *LINK* web site: "Christian Missions "; web page: "SIM History " (viewed 6 July 1999). "In 1907 New Zealander George Allan landed in Bolivia to minister to the Quechua Indians. Allan's Bolivian Indian Mission grew in the years that followed to become the fourth tributary, the Andes Evangelical Mission (AEM). "
Andhra Evangelical Lutheran Church India 800,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher ( "compiler "). "World View... ", subhead: "First Women Ordained " in Salt Lake Tribune (March 20, 1999), viewed online 21 March 1999. [Orig. source: Ecumenical News Intl.] "Last month India's biggest Lutheran church, the 800,000-member Andhra Evangelical Lutheran Church (AELC), ordained its first women. Eighteen women were ordained as pastors in the service at St. Matthew's Church in the city of Guntur in the southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. The AELC is the fourth of India's Lutheran churches to ordain women The first were ordained in 1991. "
Andhras India 66,300,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 39. "Andhras: Alternate Names: Telugu; Location: India (Andhra Pradesh State); Population: 66.3 million; Language: Telugu; Religion: Hinduism "; "Andhras are mostly Hindu by religion... " [NOTE: This statistic if of cultural/ethnic affiliation, NOT a distinct religion.]
Angkola and Mandailing Indonesia 650,000 - - - 1990 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 101. "Batak: Location: Indonesia (North Sumatra); Population: 3 to 6 million "; "According to the 1990 census, speakers of the... [three] Batak languages... numbered over 3.1 million... Assuming the percentages given in the 1930 colonial census are still accurate, one can break the total down as follows: 1.65 million Toba, living around Lake Toba, on Samosir Island, & in the highlands to the south; 500,000 Karo to the northwest of the lake; 200,000 Simalungun, east of the lake; 100,000 Dairi, west of the lake; & 650,000 Angkola and Mandailing between the Toba & the Minangkabau. " [NOTE: These are tribal/cultural (NOT religious) stats.]
Anglican Africa 25,362,000 3.48% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Anglican Africa 27,200,000 3.64% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Anglican Africa 20,551,000 2.64% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "


Anglican, continued

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