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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to clergy, North Carolina

clergy, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
clergy Ohio - 0.12% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Pennsylvania - 0.12% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Rhode Island - 0.13% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy South Carolina - 0.07% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Tennessee - 0.11% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Texas - 0.14% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Vermont - 0.20% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Virginia - 0.08% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Wisconsin - 0.13% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
Clowwewalla North America - Pacific Coast 650 - - - 1805 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Clowwewalla world 650 - - - 1805 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Coahuiltecan North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 15,000 - - - 1690 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Coahuiltecan world 15,000 - - - 1690 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Cocopa North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 3,000 - - - 1776 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Cocopa world 3,000 - - - 1776 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Cokelers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1850 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 492. "The strict puritanical sect of the Society of Dependants, or Cokelers as they were known popularly, was founded in 1850 and still has a small following today. It is exclusive to the West Sussex area and parts of south-west Surrey [England]. The origin of the strange name Cokelers is not certain, although it has been suggested that it refers to the members' custom of drinking cocoa at their meetings, as part of the simple refreshments which were provided on these occasions. Another possible explanation is that it derived from a place called Cokkeg, in the vilalge of Loxwood in Sussex, where the sect was formed. "
Cokelers United Kingdom: England 1,500 - - - 1885 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 492. "Furthermore, the Society [Society of Dependants, i.e. Cokelers] did not advocate marriage. Anyone wishing to marry was at liberty to do so, but no marriage service culd be solemnized by the followers of John Sirgood... This severe mortification of the flesh attracted many sincere, but often simple, followers and half the farm labourers in the district were soon Dependants. As Sirgood's doctrine spread further afield, many new Dependant communities sprang up in neighboring towns and villages [around Loxwood], and the Cokelers still use their chapels today... But although the Cokelers prospered, they have not multiplied. Their doctrines were sterile and their membership dwindled, out of touch with the world beyond their little kingdom. In 1885, the year of Sirgood's death, membership in the district totalled 1,500. "
Cokelers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 492. "The strict puritanical sect of the Society of Dependants, or Cokelers as they were known popularly, was founded in 1850 and still has a small following today. It is exclusive to the West Sussex area and parts of south-west Surrey [England]. "
Cokelers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 492. "Today a few of the meeting-houses remain open, but only a few Cokelers attend the services. Many of the stores and communal farms have been sold. It is not a religion likely to attract young people, in a world where the internal combustion engine, television, pop music, the cinema and alcohol are worshipped. " [In Sussex & Surrey, England]
Cokelers United Kingdom: England: Wisborough and Northchapel - 33.00% - - 1900 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 492. "At the beginning of this century the members [Society of Dependants, or Cokelers] formed almost a third of the population of Wisborough and Norchchapel, and there were many other villages under their influence. "
Cokelers world - - - 1
country
1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 492. "Today a few of the meeting-houses remain open, but only a few Cokelers attend the services. " [In Sussex & Surrey, England]
Cokelers - active United Kingdom: England 900 - - - 1904 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 492. "By 1904 there were only about 900 members regularly attending their chapels, dressed in black. "
Cokelers - active world 900 - - 1
country
1904 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 492. "By 1904 there were only about 900 members regularly attending their chapels, dressed in black. " [In Sussex & Surrey, England]
Colonial Village Pentecostal Church of the Nazarene world - - 1
unit
1
country
1968 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Other Pentecostals; pg. 293. "Colonial Village Pentecostal Church of the Nazarene grew out of an independent congregation founded in 1968 by Bernard Gill, a former minister in the Church of the Nazarene... Membership: Not reported. No recent information has been received and the present status of the Church is unknown. "
Colored Methodist Episcopal Church New York: Buffalo 80 - 1
unit
- 1926 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997). [Orig. source: 1926 U.S. govt. census from Bureau of the Census, 1930, vol. 1]; pg. 8. "Table 31. Number of churches, membership [incl. children]... 1926 "; Reports prepared by pastors/boards of elders. Listed in table as Colored Methodist Episcopal Church under subheading "Methodist bodies ".
Colored Methodist Episcopal Church USA 269,915 - 2,063
units
- 1936 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 521. "The Religious Census of 1936 reported... The fourth largest religious body among Negroes is the C.M.E. Church and it has 2,063 churches and 269,915 members. "
Colored Methodist Episcopal Church USA 365,000 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 489. Table: "The following statistical table gives the present approx. membership of the main divisions of world-wide Methodism... " Listed as "Colored Methodist Episcopal "
Colored Methodist Episcopal Church USA 381,000 - - - 1946 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 19. "...and the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, 381,000. "
Colored Primitive Baptists world 43,000 - 1,000
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 608. "Primitive Baptists:... There are 1726 churches and 69,000 members. There is also a group of Colored Primitive Baptists with 1,000 churches and 43,000 members. "
Colville USA 7,140 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) " [ "Coleville " is obviously not their own name for themselves, but was given by Westerners.]
Comanche North America 7,000 - - - 1700 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 50. "Comanche... They numbered approximately 7,000 in 1700, and 3,600 in 1985. "
Comanche North America 3,600 - - - 1985 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 50. "Comanche... They numbered approximately 7,000 in 1700, and 3,600 in 1985. "
Comanche North America - Southern Great Plains 7,000 - - - 1690 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Comanche USA 11,322 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Comanche USA 11,322 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Comanche USA 10,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 120-121. "Comanches: Location: United States (Oklahoma; Texas); Population: 10,000; Religion: Native American Church "; "After being forced onto the reservation, many Comanches began practicing peyotism. In 1918 Comanches helped form the Native American Church, which combines ideas of Christianity with the sacramental use of peyote. " [10,000 is a measure of tribal affiliation, NOT necessarily the number of Comanches who are in the Native Amerian Church, or the number who practice traditional Comanche religion.]
Comanche world 7,000 - - - 1690 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Commandment Keepers Congregation of the Living God New York - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 109. "The largest congregation of black Jews is the Commandment Keepers Congregation of the Living God, sometimes referred to as the Royal Order of Ethiopian Hebrews, the Sons and Daughters of Culture, Inc. Founded in 1919 by Rabbi Wentworth D. Mathew in Harlem, this sect follows the teachings of Orthodox Judaism... "
Commonwealth Covenant Church New Zealand 261 0.01% - - 1986 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); web page: Pentecostal groups (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level.
Commonwealth Covenant Church New Zealand 297 0.01% - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); web page: Pentecostal groups (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level.
Commonwealth Covenant Church New Zealand 171 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); web page: Pentecostal groups (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level.
Communaute des Eglises des Freres Mennonites au Congo Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) 71,262 - 405
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Africa: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " "CONGO, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC: Communaute des Eglises des Freres Mennonites au Congo (CEFMC); Members: 71,262; Congregations: 405 "
Communaute Evangelique Mennonite Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) 21,000 - 196
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Africa: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " "CONGO, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC... Communaute Evangelique Mennonite... Members (1990): 21,000+/-; Congregations: 196 "
Communaute Mennonite au Congo Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) 83,575 - 900
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Africa: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " "CONGO, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC... Communaute Mennonite au Congo (CMCO)... Members: 83,575; Congregations: 900 "
Communion Mennonite d'Haiti Haiti 400 - - - 1990 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " HAITI... Communion Mennonite d'Haiti; Members (1990): 400
Communist China - - - - 1921 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 33. "In 1921, the Communist Party in China was officially founded in Shanghai. The party's growth was fast, as was that of the Guomindang, or the National People's Party--the Nationalists--led by Dr. Sun Yatsen. The Nationalists and Communists mutually endured a brief coalition, but by 1928, Chiang Kaishek, now head of the Nationalist forces, succeeded in controlling all of China, having earlier broken off relations with the Communists, who retreated into the southern mountains. There, under Mao Zedong, they developed a strategy that replaced the Soviet doctrine of urban proletariat revolution with that of a peasant revolution foces on land reform. "
Communist China 1,000,000 - - - 1949 Kinmond, William. The First Book of Communist China. New York: Franklin Watts (1972, revised edition); pg. 42. "Even when the Communist armies were able to conquer the whole of the mainland, the paty had not many more than a million members. "
Communist China 5,000,000 - - - 1951 Kinmond, William. The First Book of Communist China. New York: Franklin Watts (1972, revised edition); pg. 42. "It grew to five million members in 1951. By 1962 the party claimed to have 17,000,000 members. "
Communist China - - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 7. "Logically, it would seem that the Communists, with their scorn for all religion and their belief in the adequacy of Marxist-approved science to answer all men's questions and needs, would make short shrift of Confucian reverence for the past or the animistic placation of gods, spirits and demons which has been the stock-in-trade of Taoism and much popular Buddhism. Perhaps the Communist rulers who hold China in such a relentless grip are following the Moscow example... "
Communist China 17,000,000 - - - 1962 Kinmond, William. The First Book of Communist China. New York: Franklin Watts (1972, revised edition); pg. 42. "Although China's government is Communist, not all Chinese are Communists or belong to the Communist party... It grew to five million members in 1951. By 1962 the party claimed to have 17,000,000 members. "
Communist China 40,000,000 - - - 1985 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994); pg. 96. "By 1985... Of the present CCP [Chinese Communist Party] membership of forty million, 40 per cent were admitted during the ascendancy of the leftists in the Cultural Revolution (1966-76). "
Communist China 60,000,000 - - - 1999 "China destroys hundreds of thousands of sect's manuals " in Dallas Morning News, 29 July 1999. [Orig. source: Washington Post]; pg. 21A. "The Communist Party has used the offensive to try to revive its fading Marxist ideology and unify the party's 60 million members, many of whom had joined the [Falun Gong] sect. "
Communist China 55,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Chambers, Steve. "Falun Dafa Movement Growing Worldwide " in Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, May 22, 1999 (viewed online 22 May 1999). [Orig. source: Religion News Service] "The Chinese government estimates there are 70 million practitioners of Falun Dafa in that country, making it larger than the 55 million-member Communist Party. "
Communist Ethiopia - - - - 1986 Kleeberg, Irene Cumming. Ethiopia. New York: Franklin Watts (1986); pg. 47. "Ethiopia is now a Marxist-Leninist Communist country, and most Communist countries discourages religion. Although some reports of religious persecution have come out of Ethiopia, few experts believe that it was actually led by the government. We can probably assume that religion, while not encouraged in Ethiopia, is not being stamped out by the government. "
Communist Korea - - - - 1945 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 142. "In 1945, the Communist Korean Workers' Party began the massive anti-religion campaign by systematically destroying about 2,000 churches and 400 Buddhist temples. Countless atrocities and murders were committed agains the 50,000 Catholics and 300,000 Protestants who became the first ideological targets of the new totalitarian regime. For example, in Yusoo, a Communist brutally murdered the two sons of Sohn Yang Won, pastor of the Wilson Leprosarium... By 1946, the Communists had also purged all Nationalist and Christian leaders from the governing coalition in the North... When the Communists came to power, one of the ways they persecuted Christians was through their children... parents were either killed outright or sent to a slow death in concentration camps. "
Communist Soviet Union 18,000,000 10.00% 400,000
units
- 1984 Time-Life Books. The Soviet Union (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984); pg. 139. "Party members number about 18 million, almost 10 per cent of the adult population, recruited from all segments of Soviet society. Membership usually ensures rapid career advancement and is all but essential for anyone with political ambitions. It demands great agility in following twists in the party line. It also entails devoting much time to meetings and administrative duties, and paying the dues (up to 3 per cent of salary for top officials) that support party functions. All members belong to one of about 400,000 primary party organizations based at their workplaces... "
Communist USA 70,000 0.10% - - 1919 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 82. "There were about 70,000 Communists I the United States in 1919--less than one-tenth of 1 percent of the nation's adult population. They were largel foreign-born and had practically no influence on the labor scene. Still, 'the Reds'--as the Communists and a variety of others on the left were loosely labeled--became scapegoatsfor much of the postwar turmoil. "
Communist world - - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 8. "As for the apparatus, what familiar ecclesastical feature does Communism lack? It has its Revealers, Marx and Lenin. It has its infallible scriptures, its orthodoxy and its heresy, its martyrs and its apostates, its hagiography and its holy office, its initiation rites and its consecrated burial grounds; it has its missionaries and its hierarchies. All it does not have today is its divinities. But given the process of human adulation another century or two to work--and the cynical gentlemen at the party controls as much time to manipulate them--and who can say that Marx and Lenin and perhaps Mao Tse-tung may not find themselves, to their amazement, among the gods. The same has happened to other agnostics. "
Communist world - - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 8. "When Communism, after it had captured Russia, proclaimed its world mission, an English archbishop identified it as a 'Christian heresy.' It is more than that. Repudiating the ancient religions as, in Marxist phraseology, 'the opium of the people,' Communism is a burning faith which is developing with amazing speed the structural outlines and apparatus of a church. It is a faith proclaiming the coming triumph of man over adversity and evil, and man's eventual entrance into earthly paradise. If, as a writer in the New Testament claims, faith is 'the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen,' then Communism, with its promise of a classless social order and an equal sharing by all mankind in all the benefits of life, surely is a faith. "
Communist world - - - - 1997 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 88. "Since communists held that their value system represented 'truth,' they were extremely intolerant of all religious teachings, because of their competing claims to truth. In fact, communism had a comprehensive world outlook and set of beliefs which made it a sort of 'religion' itself. It even promised paradise, though it was to be here on earth rather than in another world. Communist theory held that communism represented a new 'consciousness' on the part of mankind. To reach the stage of communism, therefore, it was necessary to 'transform' the thinking of the people through a process of consciousness-raising or indoctrination. "
Communist world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 29. "Communism: When considering communism from the Jewish point of view, a distinction must be drawn between the political theory, developed by Karl Marx, of a classless society based on common ownership of the means of production, and the practice of Communism in societies such as that of Soviet Russia after the Russian revolution. In the latter, where all religion is seen as opium for the masses, God is dethroned, and Judaism is subject to considerable restraint, there is obviously no room for any kind of Jewish acceptance. But the idea in itself of common ownership is not necessarily at variance with the ideals and practices of Judaism. "
Communist world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 29. "Communism: ...A prominent Rabbi once remarked that Communism would be a good thing if controlled by Rabbis; a very dubious proposition, but one can see his meaning. What is wrong with Communism is the dictatorship to which it seems inevitably to lead, which overrides the needs and opinions of individual human beings created in the image of God and results, indeed, in rejection of God Himself. "
Community Chapel and Bible Training Center Washington: Seattle 2,800 - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 284. "Membership: In 1984 there were 2,800 members of the center in Seattle... "
Community Chapel and Bible Training Center world - - - 5
countries
1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Latter Rain Pentecostals; pg. 284. "Community Chapel and Bible Training Center... Seattle, WA [H.Q.]... grew out of the Charismatic movement of the late 1960s... Membership: In 1984 there were 2,800 members of the center in Seattle, and a number of affiliated congregations around the U.S. Foreign work is conducted in Greece, the Philippines, Sweden, and Switzerland. "
Community church New Hampshire - - - - 1999 *LINK* Religion News Service. "World View " in Salt Lake Tribune, 3 July 1999 (viewed online 4 July 1999). "Screven Memorial Baptist Church in Portsmouth, N.H., -- New England's oldest Southern Baptist Convention congregation -- has become Seacoast Community Church, joining a trend of churches seeking new attendees by dropping a denominational label. Although there are more Baptist churches than any other Protestant denomination, these days Seacoast has joined an even larger group: churches with the word 'community' in their name. That is now America's most popular ecclesiastical 'denominator.' "


Community church, continued

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