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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Churches of God General Conference, world

Churches of God General Conference, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Churches of God General Conference world 36,000 - 360
units
4
countries
1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 94-94. "Churches of God, General Conference... Organization consists of 16 elderships, or conferences, which meet annually in their respective states. There is also a conference in Bangladesh and additional missionary work in India and Haiti... The General Conference is composed of ministerial and lay delegates in equal numbers... There are 360 churches with 36,000 members; primary strength is in Pennsylvania and the Midwest. "
Churches of God General Conference world 34,000 - 350
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Listed as "Churches of God, General Conference "
Churches of God General Conference world - - 345
units
1
country
1997 *LINK* official church web site Figures based on their directory.
Churches of God in Jesus Christ world 3,528 - 86
units
- 1926 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 6. "Finally, the 'Churches of God in Jesus Christ,' holding to all general adventist docrines, are an organization of independent congregations formed at Philadelphia in November, 1888. It lists 86 churches and 3,528 members. "
Churches of God in North America world 30,000 - 352
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 174-175. "Churches of God in North America: A conservative sect which originated in the revivals of John Winebrenner, a preacher of the German Reformed Church... There are 352 churches and 30,000 members. "
Churches of God, Holiness Georgia, USA 9 - 1
unit
- 1914 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 94. "Churches of God, Holiness, originated in Atlanta in 1914 with a group of eight people under the leadership of K. H. Burruss. "
Churches of God, Holiness New York: Buffalo 105 - 1
unit
- 1926 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997). [Orig. source: 1926 U.S. govt. census from Bureau of the Census, 1930, vol. 1]; pg. 8. "Table 31. Number of churches, membership [incl. children]... 1926 "; Reports prepared by pastors/boards of elders. Listed in table as Churches of God, Holiness.
Churches of God, Holiness USA 9 - 1
unit
- 1914 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 94. "Churches of God, Holiness, originated in Atlanta in 1914 with a group of eight people under the leadership of K. H. Burruss. "
Churches of God, Holiness world 9 - 1
unit
1
country
1914 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 94. "Churches of God, Holiness, originated in Atlanta in 1914 with a group of eight people under the leadership of K. H. Burruss. "
Churches of God, Holiness world - - 22
units
4
countries
1922 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Cuba, U.S., Panama, British West Indies
Churches of God, Holiness world - - 22
units
4
countries
1922 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 94. "Churches of God, Holiness, originated in Atlanta in 1914 with a group of eight people under the leadership of K. H. Burruss. Churches were established in Atlanta and in Norfolk, Virginia, in 1917; by 1922 there were 22 churches in 11 states, Cuba, the Canal Zone, and the British West Indies. "
Churches of God, Holiness world 5,800 - 35
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 174. "Churches of God, Holiness: A Negro holiness sect organized by K. H. Burrus at Atlanta, Ga., in 1916. It teaches divine healing and entire sanctification. Ther are 35 churches and 5,800 members. "
Churches of God, Holiness world 25,600 - 42
units
- 1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Black Holiness; pg. 223. "Churches of God, Holiness... Atlanta, GA [H.Q.]... were formed by Bishop King Hezekiah Burruss (d. 1963), formerly of the Church of Christ (Holiness) U.S.A. Burruss began a church in Atlanta in 1914 that belonged to that organization, and by 1920, the Atlanta congregation was large enough that it hosted the national convention of the Church of Christ (Holiness) U.S.A. Shortly after that Atlanta meeting, however, Burruss formed his own church... Membership: Not reported. In 1967 there were 42 churches, 16 ministers and 25,600 members, mostly along the East Coast. "
Churches of God, Holiness world 25,600 - 32
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 94. "The church reports 25,600 member in 32 churches. "
Churches of God, Holiness world 25,600 - 32
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Listed as "Church of God, Holiness "
Chuvash Russia 1,773,645 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 105-107. "Chuvash: Location: Russia (Chuvash Republic in Middle Volga River region); Population: 1,773,645 (1989 census); Language: Chuvash; Religion: Christianity; some pagan rituals surive "; "The majority of Chuvash were forcibly Christianized in the middle of the 18th century.. Animistic mortuary rites were practiced by the great majority of Bulgars as late as 1400 AD, and the Chuvash continued to observe these rites until they were Christianized... The majority of Chuvash profess Christianity, but some remnants of paganism survive in their religions idea of the universe. Wedding & funeral rites, worship of kiremet (a sacred tree, an offering palce), & agricultural festivals... area all indicative of the vitality of paganism. "
Chuvash Russia: Chuvash 900,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Chuvash is a territory in the middle Volga region, about 500 kilometres east of Moscow. There are 1.8 million Chuvash, about half living in Chuvash. Presently Chuvash is an autonomous region in the Russian Federation. "
Chuvash Russia: Chuvash 952,000 68.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Chuvash " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The Chuvash Republic is situated in the mid-Volga region. It borders the Mordovo Republic, the Mari Republic, the Republic of Tatarstan, and the Nizhni-Novgorod and Uljansk district of the Russian Federation.... Chuvash are descendants of the Bulgar people. The population of Chuvash Republic is 1.4 million, of which Chuvash make up 68%. Other groups are Russians (26.7%), Tatars (2.7%) and Mordovians (1.4%). "
Chuvash Russia: Mari 7,500 1.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Mari " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The population of Mari is approximately 750,000... In the Mari Republic, Russians are the second largest population group, representing 48% of the total, Tatars 6% and Chuvash 1%. "
Chuvash Soviet Union 2,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Chuvash " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The total number of Chuvash is 2 million in the former Soviet Union of which 48% of them live in Chuvash. "
Chuvash world 1,800,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Chuvash is a territory in the middle Volga region, about 500 kilometres east of Moscow. There are 1.8 million Chuvash, about half living in Chuvash. Presently Chuvash is an autonomous region in the Russian Federation. "
Circassians Jordan - - - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 49. "The vast majority of Jordan is Muslim--over 90% of the population is made up of Sunni Muslims... 8% of Jordan's population is Christian... A small number of Druze... live near the Syrian border, along with Samaritans and Circassians... the Circassians are Sunni Muslims. "
Circassians Jordan - - - - 1989 Foster, Leila Merrell. Jordan (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1991); pg. 94. "The largest [ethnic] minority is the Circassians who came from Russia when the ottoman Turks resettled them in Jordan in the late 19th and 20th centuries. They are tall, light skinned, often with blond hair and blue eyes, and have adopted Western-style dress. Also, they are abandoning their traditional language, Cherkess, in order to adopt Arabic. Many Circassians are in the armed forces. One elite unit hade up of this group has special uniforms reflecing their Caucasus origin with black fur hats, long coats, riding boots, and long daggers. They are a royal honor guard. Intermarriage with Arabs isnot unusual since these people are Sunni Muslims. Circassian traditions include inheritance of all the property by the oldest son and a ceremonial stealing of the bribe. "
Circassians Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999); pg. 60, 63. Pg. 60: "Jordan's population of 4.4 million (not including the West Bank)... The vast majority of inhabitants are of Arab origin, most of whom follow Islam and are of the Sunni branch. About 7 per cent of the nation's people are Christian; another small percentage is made up of Circassians (Sunni Muslims brought by the Ottomans from the Caucasus to what is now Jordan). "; Pg. 63: "Many thousands of Circassians now live in Jordan. Their groups are spread through Amman, Jerash, Wadi el-Seer, Suweilih, Zarqa, Azraq, and other parts of the north... Today Circassians have managed to carve a niche for themselves in Jordan. They are a well-educated and socially responsible people who have sought to develop and improve society. "
Circassians Russia: Circassia - 10.00% - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "The historic Circassia is situated in Caucasia, north of the eastern Black Sea. During the war between 1711-1864, Circassia lost 90% of its population, some through deportation to the Ottoman Empire... Only 10% of the population in Circassia are ethnic Circassians. "
Circassians Russia: Circassia - 10.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Circassia " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The historic Circassia is situated in Caucasia, north of the eastern Black Sea... Only 10% of the population of Circassia are ethnic Circassians. "
Circassians world 3,000,000 - - 50
countries
1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "The historic Circassia is situated in Caucasia, north of the eastern Black Sea... They are now spread all over the world and there are today 3 million Circassians in 50 countries... The Circassians are Muslims and the women are increasingly becoming a force in the political and social development. "
Circassians world - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999); pg. 62-63. "The exodus and migration began in the year 1878, reaching its height between 1864 and 1878. This migration, in which thousands of Circassians sought new homes, continued until the turn of the century. The migration occurred because of persecution by Christians in Russia. They searched for a place to safeguard their Islamic faith. The majority who fled the Black Sea region settled in Turkey, Syria and Jordan. For political reasons the Ottoman regime encouraged the migration and about 600,000 Circassians left Russia. "
Circassians world 3,000,000 - - 50
countries
1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Circassia " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Population: There are today 3 million Circessians in 50 countries. "
Circle of Aradia USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 74. "Circle of Aradia, Ruth Barrett, 41111 Lincoln Blvd. #211, Marina del Rey, CA 90292. A group of Feminist Activist women in the Dianic Tradition; open rituals several times a year for the women's community; sponsors occasional events & workshops. "
Circle Sanctuary North America 15,000 - - - 1999 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 110. "Circle Sanctuary -- commonly called Circle -- is an example of a group that has successfully incorporated as a church, bought land, and economically supported clergy. Based in Wisconsin, Circle is the largest Neo-Pagan organization in the U.S. (Melton 1992:327). Its newsletter, Circle Network News, has fifteen thousand subscribers (Kelly 1992:141). Of the several festivals a year the group holds on its land, the largest is Pagan Spirit Gathering. Circle also holds seminars, maintains a Neo-Pagan network, and actively helps Neo-Pagan individuals and groups in the U.S. and Canada who believe they have suffered from discrimination due to their religious beliefs and practices. "
Circle Sanctuary world 15,000 - - - 1987 *LINK* web site: "Gray Mantle's Homepage of Shadows " (1998); posting article: "Witches, Pagans Cast Aside Shroud Of Secrecy ", by Grant Willis, The Air Force Times (Oct. 26, 1987). "Jack and his wife did attend a workshop for military pagans last summer at Barneveld, Wis. The worship had about eight participants and was sponsored by Circle Sanctuary, a 10-year old Wiccan church that claims 15,000 members. "
Circle Sanctuary world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 74. "Circle, P.O. Box 219, Mt. Horeb, WI 53572. Legally recognized Wiccan Church with worldwide ministry that includes networking, festivals, healing, herb-crafting, counseling, workshops, residential training programs, legal marriage ceremonies, speaking tours, other services; publishes Circle Network News... "
Citizen's Freedom Foundation world 1,500 - - - 1975 *LINK* web site: "Institute for the Study of American Religions "; web page: "The Anti-Cult Movement " (viewed 26 March 1999). "This page was last updated on 6/12/97. " "By 1974 Rambur and other leaders of the burgeoning movement, seeing the need of a national organization, formed the Citizen's Freedom Foundation. By 1975 membership reached 1,500 though it was merely the largest of several parent's associations then in existence. "
citizens Greece - 16.67% - - -500 B.C.E. Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992); pg. 9. "The glory that was Greece. There was an extraordinary flowering of culture in classical Greece. Passionate and enquiring, the Greeks produced ideas and artefacts out of all proportion to the general development of the society of the time... But it must be remembered that the newly-invented democracies were based on slavery--only one-sixth of the members of a city-state were citizens, once hyou counted out slaves, children, foreigners (barbarians the Greeks called them) and women (who had almost no civil rights). This was to deform their attempts to develop ethical and political philosophies. "
Clackamas North America - Pacific Coast 2,500 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Clackamas world 2,500 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Clallum North America - Pacific Coast 2,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Clallum world 2,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Clapham sect United Kingdom: England - - - - 1800 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "CLAPHAM SECT: a group of influential Englishmen, including William WILBERFORCE and Lord SHAFTESBURY, whose activities centered on the EVANGELICAL religion preached at Clapham Parish Church in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. They toiled for the ABOLITION of slavery, REFORM of child labor laws, and many other social innovations in addition to supporting MISSIONARY work and evangelical CHRISTIANITY generally. "
Clatskanie North America - Pacific Coast 1,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Clatskanie world 1,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Clatsop North America - Pacific Coast 300 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Clatsop world 300 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
clergy Alabama - 0.09% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Arkansas - 0.11% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Connecticut - 0.19% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Delaware - 0.09% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Florida - 0.09% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Georgia, USA - 0.08% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Illinois - 0.12% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Indiana - 0.11% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Iowa - 0.13% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Kentucky - 0.09% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Louisiana - 0.04% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Maine - 0.16% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Maryland - 0.08% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Massachusetts - 0.17% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Michigan - 0.14% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Mississippi - 0.08% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy Missouri - 0.12% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy New Hampshire - 0.20% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy New Jersey - 0.13% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy New York - 0.14% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "
clergy North Carolina - 0.09% - - 1850 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 69. Figure 3.4: "Clergy per 1,000 Population, 1850 "


clergy, continued

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