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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

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Amhara, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Amidism China - - - - 1960 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 45. "Since the fourteenth century, the Amitabha school had dominated the life and culture of the Chinese people. "
Amidism China - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 8. "Amidism: generic term under which are comprehended all schools of Chinese and Japanese Buddhism that have made Amitabha the central point of their teaching. Included are the Pure Land school, Jodo-shin-shu, and Jodo-shu. "
Amidism Japan - - - - 1282 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 538. "Nichiren Buddhism has been criticized as... intolerant... Nichiren condemned other sects in the stinging phrase: Nembutsu mugen, Zen tenma, Shingon bokoku, Ritsu kokuzoku (the Nembutsu--Amida Buddhism--is hell; Zen is a devil; Shingon is the nation's ruin; and Ritsu is treason).' "
Amidism Japan - - - - 1300 C.E. Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 285. "Back in the Kamakura Period, when religion was a much more vital social force than it is today, the Amidaists directly contended for converts with the followers of the obstinate reformer Nichiren... "
Amidism Japan - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 8. "Amidism: generic term under which are comprehended all schools of Chinese and Japanese Buddhism that have made Amitabha the central point of their teaching. Included are the Pure Land school, Jodo-shin-shu, and Jodo-shu. "
Amidism Japan - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 284. "Amida Buddhism: There are today an estimated 56 main divisions, and 170 subdivisions, in Japanese Buddhism. The single most popular sect is Jodo Shinshu, founded by Shinran... who preached an 'easy road to salvation' by means of the nembutsu prayer to the Amida, a bodhisattva who made a vow eons ago to save all who placed faith in him or her, and to guide them to the Blissful Land of Purity. About half of the Japanese Buddhists belong to either Jodo Shinshu, or to Jodo, another form of Amidaism established by Honen... Amidaism is perhaps the form of Buddhism closest to the core Japanese beliefs, in its slight concern for moral judgement and exultation of natural inclinations beyond considerations of good and evil. This, no doubt, helps account for its popularity. "
Amidism Tibet - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 27. "Amitabha in Tibet. In Tibet, unlike East Asia, Amitayus and Amitabha are considered names of two different Buddhas. Amitabha is particularly important, not as a savior figure, but as one of the five primordial, self-born Dhyani Buddhas; Avalokitesvara is his manifestation in active, bodhisattva form. Tibetans ritually recognize, for example, that the sacred mantra of Avalokitesvara, Om Manipadme Hum, derives primordially from Amitabha. "
Amish Europe - - - - 1800 Hostetler, John A. Amish Society (3rd ed.; 1st ed. pub. 1963). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1980); pg. 66. "The Amish in Europe were scattered and were unable to live in compact settlements... In Europe the Amish lived in Switzerland, Alsace, France, Germany, Holland, Bavaria, Galicia (Poland), and volhynia (Russia). "
Amish Europe 0 - - - 1963 Hostetler, John A. Amish Society (3rd ed.; 1st ed. pub. 1963). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1980); pg. 66. "Today there are no Amish congregations in Europe that have retained the name and practices of the original group. The group's descendants in Europe have reunited with the Mennonites or have otherwise lost their Amish identity. Some of the families and churches are aware of their Amish background, but it is only in North America that the name and distinctive practices of the Amish have survived. "
Amish Europe 0 0.00% - - 1989 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 12. "Today... Extinct in their European homeland... "
Amish France - - - - 1693 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 6. "By the late 1600s a group of Swiss Anabaptists emigrated northward from Switzerland to the Alsace region, which lies in present-day France, between the Rhine River and the Vosges Mountains. A bitter controversy erupted between the Alsatian immigrants and those who remained in Switzerland. The quarel came to a head in 1693 and gave birth to the Amish church... The decisive issue, however, that polarized the Swiss and Alsatian Anabaptists was the treatment of excommunicated members. Following the teaching of the Dutch Anabaptists, Ammann taught that expelled members should not only be banned from communion but also shunned in normal social relations... secondary issues, such as the excommunication of liars and the salvation of Anabaptist sympathizers, also hovered ove the dispute. However, the shunning of excommunicated members drove the final wedge between the Swiss and Alsatian Anabaptists in 1693. "
Amish Germany 0 - - - 1900 Hostetler, John A. Amish Society (3rd ed.; 1st ed. pub. 1963). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1980); pg. 67. "In southern Germany, Amish families lived in scattered places, but especially in the vicinity of Kaiserslautern. An Amish group from Alsace also settled at Essingen, near Landau. The Amish never developed large communities in the Palatinate, but emigrated in large numbers... to other points in Germany and to North America. In 1730 a group settled in middle Germany in the Hesse-Cassel region at Wittgenstein (later Waldeck), and in 1800 some settled in the Lahn Valley near Marburg. Small groups found their way to the vicinity of Neuwied and the Eiffel region. The groups from middle Germany, known as Hessian Amish, left for North America, and by 1900 all traces of the Amish had vanished from that area... "
Amish North America - - 2
units
- 1737 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 8. "in 1737... the Amish established their first two settlements [in North America]... "
Amish North America 5,000 - - - 1900 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. vii. "...the Amish... From a meager band of five thousand in 1900... "
Amish North America - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 27. "Amish: A strict Mennonite branch of Swiss Anabaptists now found primarily in North America. "
Amish North America 100,000 - 660
units
- 1989 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 12. "Today in North America, 660 Amish congregations are scattered throughout twenty states and the Canadian province of Ontario. They total more than one hundred thousand adults and children... the Amish are prospering in the U.S. Of the 175 settlements across the nation, 70 percent were founded after 1960. Settlements vary consierably in size. Ninety contain only one congregation, whereas the largest settlement in Ohio has over 110 congregations. Approximately 70 percent of the Amish live in three states: Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Moroever, half of the Pennsylvania Amish live in the Lancaster community. "
Amish North America 100,000 - - - 1993 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. vii. "The year 1993 marks the three hundredth birthday of Amish society. Despite their rejection of modern ways, the Amish are thriving in the twentieth century. From a meager band of five thousand in 1900 they have blossomed to over one hundred thousand in North America today. "
Amish North America 144,000 - - 2
countries
1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 40. "The Amish: Location: United States (majority in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Indiana; Montana; Florida; Texas); Canada (Ontario); Population: 144,000; Religion: Amish (an Anabaptist Christian sect) "
Amish Ohio 45,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance -
Amish Ontario 1,500 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance -
Amish Pennsylvania - - - - 1723 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998); pg. 1. "At the end of the Thirty Years' War between the Protestants and the Catholics in Europe, each prince was allowed to choose the religion for everyone in his territory. Because the Amish would not join any other church, they were forced from their homes and punished. They escaped to America, where they settled in Pennsylvania. "
Amish Pennsylvania - - - - 1725 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 27. "Amish... The focus shifted to North America, beginning with migration to Eastern Pennsylvania in the 1720s. "
Amish Pennsylvania - - 2
units
- 1737 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 7-8. "It is possible that some early Amish immigrants accompanied these Mennonite settlers, but historians are uncertain when the first Amish arrived in the New World. In any event, Amish immigrations in the eighteenth century peaked between 1727 and 1770. The Charming Nancy, the first ship carrying a large group of Amish, docked in Philadelphia in 1737 after an 83-day voyage. Thus in 1737, some twenty-seven years after the establishment of the first Mennonite colony in the Lancaster area, the Amish established their first two settlements. One of the settlements, known as Old Conestoga, or West Conestoga, was situated a few miles northeast of the present-day city of Lancaster. However, most of the Charming Nancy's passengers made their home in the Northkill colony, in southern Berks County, thirty miles northeast of Lancaster. An Amish historian concludes: 'These two settlements can rightly be called the mother colonies of our present districts in Lancaster County.' "
Amish Pennsylvania - - - - 1989 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 15. "The Lancaster settlement has spawned at least twenty-three new congregatoinsin other Pennsylvania counties since 1940. A gropu of families migrated to St. Mary's County, Maryland, in 1940. A year later a second outpost opened in Lebanon County, bordering the northern edge of Lancaster County. THe migration halted for two decades, until the late sixties, when new settlements were founded in a half-dozen other Pennsylvania counties. Today some two dozen young church districts, representint nearly four thousand people, trace their roots back to the parent community in Lancaster. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 150 - 2
units
- 1737 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 8. "The Conestoga congregatin began about 1760, and the Pequea congregation began about 1790. The Lancaster Amish community consisted of these two congregations, with probably no more than 150 adult members, until 1843... "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - - 2
units
- 1737 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 8. "in 1737... in the Lancaster area, the Amish established their first two settlements... the mother colonies of our present districts in Lancaster County "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - - 3
units
- 1843 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 8. "The Lancaster Amish community consisted of these two congregations, with probably no more than 150 adult members, until 1843, when a third congregation was formed. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - - 4
units
- 1852 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 8. "The Lancaster Amish community... A fourth group blossomed in 1852 "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - - 6
units
- 1880 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 8. "The Lancaster Amish community... A fourth group blossomed in 1852, and by 1880 there were six congregational clusters in the Lancaster region. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 800 - - - 1890 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 15. Figure 1-4: "Amish Population Growth, Lancaster Settlement, 1890-1900 "; "Population estimates include children and adults. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 1,600 - - - 1910 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 15. Figure 1-4: "Amish Population Growth, Lancaster Settlement, 1890-1900 "; "Population estimates include children and adults. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 2,100 - - - 1930 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 15. Figure 1-4: "Amish Population Growth, Lancaster Settlement, 1890-1900 "; "Population estimates include children and adults. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 3,900 - - - 1950 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 15. Figure 1-4: "Amish Population Growth, Lancaster Settlement, 1890-1900 "; "Population estimates include children and adults. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 6,200 - - - 1970 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 15. Figure 1-4: "Amish Population Growth, Lancaster Settlement, 1890-1900 "; "Population estimates include children and adults. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 7,300 1.82% 92
units
- 1987 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 10. Table 1-1: "Plain Churches in Lancaster County "; "Inncludes groups that presently wear plain clothing, as well as those groups that wore it earlier in the 20 century. "; Members: "Membership rounded to nearest hundred. Includes only baptized members, not children. " Table lists Old Order Amish (83 congregations w/ 6,300 members); 6 'Other Amish groups' (10 congreg. w/ 1,000 members) " [Total Amish congregations: 92. Total membership appears to be 7,300 (baptized only).]
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - - - - 1987 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 11. "The Lancaster settlement spans twenty-four of the county's forty-one townships. Amsih and non-Amish homes are interspersed throughout the settlement. The densityof the Amish population increases toward the settlement's center, where they may own the builk of the farmland. In one Lancaster County township the Amish hold about 90 percent of the farmland. However, even in thehhub of the community they are far outnumbered by non-Amish, who live beside them in small towns and along country roads. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 15,000 3.75% - - 1989 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 10. "Lancaster's Old Order Amish community of fourteen thousand children and adults... Nearly 86 percent of the Amish in Lancaster County are affiliated with the Old Order Amish... At least six varieties of more progressive Amish... number nearly one thousand members. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - - - - 1989 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 8. "Over the years, Lancaster Couny has been a pleasant home for the Amish settles, whose hard work helped to forge its distinguished agricultural reputation. Known locally as the world's Garden Spot, the county ranks first nationally in agricultural production among nonirrigated counties. Fertile soils, a moderate climate, ample rainfall, and the hard toil of farmers have transformed the 946-square-mile area into an agricultural paradise. with some five thousand farms and 69 percent of its acreage in farmland, the couny leads Pennsylvania in the commercial value of milk, eggs, poultry, meat, corn, hay, and tobacco. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - 3.00% - - 1989 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 12. "The Amish are not the only religious group in Lancaster County. In fact, they represent merely 3 percent of the county's adult population, as shown in figure 1-3. " [The 3 percent figure includes baptized as well as non-baptized over age of 12.]
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - - - - 1989 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 14. "When asked how many children they thikn are ideal for an Amish family, older women answer, 'As many as come,' but young women on the average want about 6 children. These young women know their business well, for the completed Amish family includes 66. children, nearly triple the number in the average American family. About 15 percent of the Amish couples in the Lancaster community have 10 or more children. "
Amish Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 16,000 - - - 1990 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 15. Figure 1-4: "Amish Population Growth, Lancaster Settlement, 1890-1900 "; "Population estimates include children and adults. "
Amish Switzerland - - - - 1690 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 348. "Mennonites... One of their best-known sects is the Amish, who separated from the mainstream in Switzerland around 1690 under Jacob Ammon, who insisted on a stricter observance of rules. "
Amish Switzerland - - - - 1693 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 27. "Amish: A strict Mennonite branch of Swiss Anabaptists now found primarily in North America. In 1693 Jakob Ammann (1644?-1725?), Mennonite elder near Berne, began to enforce church discipline rigidly... "
Amish Switzerland - - - - 1694 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998); pg. 1. "Amish. In 1694 Jacob Ammann, a Swiss farmer... Ammann and his followers--who became known as the 'Amish'... "
Amish Switzerland - - - - 1710 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 27. "Amish... In 1693 Jakob Ammann (1644?-1725?), Mennonite elder near Berne, began to enforce church discipline rigidly... The Ammann-led faction found adherents among Mennonites in Alsace and South Germany as well as in Switzerland, Holland, and Russia. "
Amish Switzerland - - 2
units
- 1810 Hostetler, John A. Amish Society (3rd ed.; 1st ed. pub. 1963). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1980); pg. 67. "In Switzerland there were two settlements of Amish, one in the Emme Valley and one in the Lake Thun area. The Amish founded two other congregations, La Chaux-de-Fonds and Neuchatel (Neuenburg), when there was a general emigration from the canton of Bern to the bishopric of Basel in the 18th century. There were still two Amish congregations in Switzerland as late as 1810, but they have since gradually lost their distinctiveness. "
Amish Switzerland - - - - 1900 Hostetler, John A. Amish Society (3rd ed.; 1st ed. pub. 1963). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1980); pg. 67. "There were still two Amish congregations in Switzerland as late as 1810, but they have since gradually lost their distinctiveness. In 1886 these groups still practiced foot washing, but by about 1900 they longer called themselves Amish. They affiliated with the Swiss Mennonite Conference. The present Mennonite congregation in Basel (Basel-Holeestrasse) dates from 1777 and is of Amish background. "
Amish USA - - - - 2001 *LINK* AP. "Amish Thriving " in Salt Lake Tribune, 21 Apr 2001. PHILADELPHIA -- Amish communities and other isolated religious colonies are thriving by persuading their children to continue their largely preindustrial ways and remain with their churches, according to a new study. The Amish, the largest of four "Old Order " groups examined, keep more than 75 percent of their children in the fold, the study found. Hutterites, the nation's oldest rigidly communal Protestant order, persuade more than 95 percent of their young to remain in the large agricultural communes mostly in the northwestern United States and western Canada. Results from the 10-year study have been compiled in a book published this month, On the Backroad to Heaven.
Amish world 3,700 - - - 1890 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: John A. Hostetler, Amish Society, 4th ed. (Baltimore: John Hopkins, 1993), chart on p. 97 compiled from several sources.]; pg. 23. "In the past century, in fact, the Amish have had so many children, and so many of them have decided to remain Amish, that the population of their communities has grown from an estimated 3,700 in 1890 to 128,000 in 1990. "
Amish world 5,000 - - - 1900 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 46. "As a matter of record, the Amish population has shown spectacular growth: 5,000 in 1900; 33,000 in 1950; well over 100,000 today. "
Amish world 8,000 - - - 1900 Wallechinsky, David & Irving Wallace; The People's Almanac: #2; New York: William Morrow & Co.: (1978); pg. 1173. "They are now in 20 states, Canada, and Central and South America. In 1900 the Amish numbered 8,000; in 1950, 33,000; in 1970, 70,000; and in 1977, 85,000. "
Amish world 33,000 - - - 1950 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 46. "As a matter of record, the Amish population has shown spectacular growth: 5,000 in 1900; 33,000 in 1950; well over 100,000 today. "
Amish world 33,000 - - - 1950 Wallechinsky, David & Irving Wallace; The People's Almanac: #2; New York: William Morrow & Co.: (1978); pg. 1173. "They are now in 20 states, Canada, and Central and South America. In 1900 the Amish numbered 8,000; in 1950, 33,000; in 1970, 70,000; and in 1977, 85,000. "
Amish world 64,000 - - - 1970 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: John A. Hostetler, Amish Society, 4th ed. (Baltimore: John Hopkins, 1993), chart on p. 97 compiled from several sources.]; pg. 23. "In the past century, in fact, the Amish have had so many children, and so many of them have decided to remain Amish, that the population of their communities has grown from an estimated 3,700 in 1890 to 128,000 in 1990. In the past 20 years alone, their population has doubled.. "
Amish world 70,000 - - - 1970 Wallechinsky, David & Irving Wallace; The People's Almanac: #2; New York: William Morrow & Co.: (1978); pg. 1173. "They are now in 20 states, Canada, and Central and South America. In 1900 the Amish numbered 8,000; in 1950, 33,000; in 1970, 70,000; and in 1977, 85,000. "
Amish world 85,000 - - - 1977 Wallechinsky, David & Irving Wallace; The People's Almanac: #2; New York: William Morrow & Co.: (1978); pg. 1173. "They are now in 20 states, Canada, and Central and South America. In 1900 the Amish numbered 8,000; in 1950, 33,000; in 1970, 70,000; and in 1977, 85,000. "
Amish world - - 112
units
4
countries
1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 27. "Today the Amish are concentrated in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Indiana--in that order. They have 112 settlements in twenty states, Ontario, Honduras, and Paraguay. "
Amish world 128,000 - - - 1990 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: John A. Hostetler, Amish Society, 4th ed. (Baltimore: John Hopkins, 1993), chart on p. 97 compiled from several sources.]; pg. 23. "In the past century, in fact, the Amish have had so many children, and so many of them have decided to remain Amish, that the population of their communities has grown from an estimated 3,700 in 1890 to 128,000 in 1990. "
Amish world 100,000 - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 46. "As a matter of record, the Amish population has shown spectacular growth: 5,000 in 1900; 33,000 in 1950; well over 100,000 today. "
Amish world 39,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (viewed 1998) [Orig. source: Melton, J Gordon. 1996 Encyclopedia of American Religions. Detroit, Michigan: Gale Research Co. Fifth Edition. (p 729)] The total Amish population is estimated at 134,000, but only adults are counted as full church members. (Melton, 1996: 729)
Amish world 100,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance Probably the total of all Amish groups would be on the order of 100,000 in 22 states, including about 45,000 in Ohio and smaller numbers in Illinois, Indiana, Pennsylvania, etc.
Amish - other Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - - 2
units
- 1877 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 21. "The first major dissension erupted in 1877. Following Amish divisions in the Midwest, two progressive factions withdrew from the Lancaster community and formed independent congregations. Within five years each group built a meeting house for its worship services. Sometime after this division, the traditional Amish became known as the Old Order Amish or House Amish because they continued to worship in their homes. The splinter groups, labeled Amish-Mennonite or 'Meeting House Amish,' held their worship services in a church building. The progressive groups eventually became full-fledged Mennonites. "
Amish - other Pennsylvania: Lancaster County - - - - 1910 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 21. "The second division occurred in 1910, as cars, telephones, electricity, and mechanized farm equipment were beginning to revolutionize the social landscape of rural America. Disturbed by a strict interpretation of shunning, a liberal faction formed an independent group, eventually konwn as the Peachy church. Although very similar to the Old Order Amish in dres and outlook, the group embraced evangelical religious expressions (such as Sunday school) and tolerated technological innovations (such as telephones, electricy, tractors, and, eventually cars). Today this groupi saffiliated with the Beachy Amish church. "
Amish - other Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 1,000 - - - 1966 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 21-22. "The third division came in 1966 when a group of so-called New Order Amish left the Amish fold over differences related to the use of modern farm machinery. This faction subsequently splintered into several subgroups of New Order Amish, which vary in dres andin the use of cars, tractors, electricity, and church buildings. The various pockets of progressive Amish groups in the Lancaster area number less than one thousand members. "
Amish - other Pennsylvania: Lancaster County 1,000 0.25% 10
units
- 1987 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989); pg. 10. Table 1-1: "Plain Churches in Lancaster County "; "Inncludes groups that presently wear plain clothing, as well as those groups that wore it earlier in the 20 century. "; Members: "Membership rounded to nearest hundred. Includes only baptized members, not children. " Table lists Old Order Amish (83 congregations w/ 6,300 members); 6 'Other Amish groups' (10 congreg. w/ 1,000 members) "


Amish - other, continued

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