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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Christianity, Japan

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity Japan - 2.00% - - 1996 "The Church in Japan, Korea, and Far-East Russia " in Ensign (Nov. 1996); pg. 110. "Christians in Japan still represent only about 2 percent of the total population, but The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the third largest Christian denomination in Japan. We have more than 100,000 Japanese members... "
Christianity Japan 1,550,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Christianity Japan 1,500,000 1.25% - - 1996 Halverson, Dean C. (ed.) The Compact Guide to World Religions; Colorado Springs, Colorado: International Students Inc. (1996). [Publisher is an Evangelical missionary organization.]; pg. 206. "Only about 1.5 million of the 120 million Japanese declare themselves Christians. But 112 million adhere to Shinto. Many Japanese see themselves as followers of several religions, for 93 million are also Buddhists! "
Christianity Japan 880,130 0.70% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) observe both Shinto and Buddhist 84%, other 16% (including Christian 0.7%); Total population: 125,732,794.
Christianity Japan 1,250,000 1.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 330-331. "Japan's population is about 125 million. "; Pg. 321: "Only 1% of Japanese are Christians, but Christian teachings, especially its social ethics, have influenced Japanese thinking. "
Christianity Japan - 1.20% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Basic Facts Christianity in Japan at a Glance " (1998). 1996, 1997, 1998 Paul Tsuchido Shew Table: "Statistical Variences of Religion Affiliation in Japan: Official Membership Statistics vs. Independent Survey Results ": Official organization reporting, Christian 1.2%; survey of religious preference: 1-3%
Christianity Japan - 3.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Basic Facts Christianity in Japan at a Glance " (1998). 1996, 1997, 1998 Paul Tsuchido Shew Table: "Statistical Variences of Religion Affiliation in Japan: Official Membership Statistics vs. Independent Survey Results ": Official organization reporting, Christian 1.2%; survey of religious preference: 1-3%
Christianity Japan - Koreans - 1.00% - - 1988 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "The total number of Christians among Korean residents comes to less than 1%, even when taking into consideration the members of Catholic and other Protestant churches. This percentage is about the same as for Christians in Japan as a whole. "
Christianity Japan: Tokyo: Ginza - - 1
unit
- 1986 *LINK* Ishii, Kenji. "The Secularization of Religion in the City " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1986: 13/2-3 (viewed online 30 Jan. 1999). "The Ginza in Tokyo is a small district which covers not even one square kilometer... As our investigation revealed, there are at present not less than 36 religious facilities in the district, of which the majority are Inari shrines... Only four are religious institutions in the strict sense with a legal identity and which actively propagate their teachings: the Ginza Church of Konk'oky'o, Ginza (Christian) Church, the Hachikan Shrine, and the H'oju Inari Shrine... "
Christianity Jersey - - - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Anglican, Roman Catholic, Baptist, Congregational New Church, Methodist, Presbyterian; Total population: 88,510. (Crown dependency of Great Britain)
Christianity Jordan 301,600 8.00% - - 1983 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986); pg. 204. "Population: Estimated 3,770,000 in 1984-85, including approximately 972,000 under Israeli occupation on the West Bank. Religion: 92% Sunni Moslem, 8% Christian. "
Christianity Jordan 208,000 8.00% - - 1985 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 49. "Eight percent of Jordan's population is Christian. Christians are mostly of the Eastern Orthodox and Greek Catholics sects, followed by a number of Roman Catholics and Protestants. "
Christianity Jordan 232,000 8.00% - - 1987 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 2.9 million [total pop.] (1987). Mostly Sunni Muslim; about 2,000 Shia Muslims. Christians (Eastern Orthodox, Greek Orthodox, Greek Catholics, Roman Catholics, a few Protestants) are 5 to 8 % of population. Also: small groups, such as Druzes, Bahais.
Christianity Jordan 250,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Christianity Jordan 345,971 8.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Sunni Muslim 92%, Christian 8%; Total population: 4,324,638.
Christianity Jordan 308,000 7.00% - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999); pg. 60. Pg. 60: "Jordan's population of 4.4 million (not including the West Bank)... About 7 per cent of the nation's people are Christian... "
Christianity Jordan - 7.00% - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999); pg. 67. "Among these are various Christian communities who make up about 7 per cent of Jordan's population. They live mostly in Amman and around Madaba, Kerak, Salt and Ajlun. A large percentage of Jordan's Christians are members of the Greek Orthodox Church... Jordan has a substantial number of Roman Catholics, as well as others of the Catholic faith from Armenia and Syria. Various Protestant denominations are also found in Amman and in small numbers elsewhere. "
Christianity Kansas - 89.90% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990... Self-identification of religious loyalty, using representative sample of 113,000 people in phone interviews. Sum of % by state of 21 main groups Kosmin classified as Christian: Assemblies of God, Baptist, Christianity - no denomination supplied, Church of God - all denominations, Church of the Nazarene, Churches of Christ, Congregationalist, Episcopalian, Evangelical/Born Again, Jehovah's Witnesses, Latter Day Saints, Holiness/Holy, Lutheran, Mennonite, Methodist, Orthodox, Pentecostal, Presbyterian, Protestant - no denomination supplied, Catholic, Seventh-day Adventists
Christianity Kansas - 73.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Sum of all major groups classified by study as Christian: Catholic, Baptist, Methodist, Lutheran, Presbyterian, Protestant - no denomination supplied, Pentecostal, Episcopalian/Anglican, Mormon/LDS, Church of Christ, Non-denominational, Congregationalist/UCC, Jehovah's Witnesses, Assemblies of God, Evangelical, Church of God, Seventh-Day Adventist.]
Christianity Kentucky - 89.80% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990... Self-identification of religious loyalty, using representative sample of 113,000 people in phone interviews. Sum of % by state of 21 main groups Kosmin classified as Christian: Assemblies of God, Baptist, Christianity - no denomination supplied, Church of God - all denominations, Church of the Nazarene, Churches of Christ, Congregationalist, Episcopalian, Evangelical/Born Again, Jehovah's Witnesses, Latter Day Saints, Holiness/Holy, Lutheran, Mennonite, Methodist, Orthodox, Pentecostal, Presbyterian, Protestant - no denomination supplied, Catholic, Seventh-day Adventists
Christianity Kentucky - 76.00% - - 2001 *LINK* Kosmin, Barry A.; Egon Mayer; & Ariela Keysar. "American Religious Identity Survey. " 2001. City University of New York. ARIS: Nationwide phone survey of 50,000 American adults; open-ended question: 'What is your religion, if any?'; Sum of all major groups classified by study as Christian: Catholic, Baptist, Methodist, Lutheran, Presbyterian, Protestant - no denomination supplied, Pentecostal, Episcopalian/Anglican, Mormon/LDS, Church of Christ, Non-denominational, Congregationalist/UCC, Jehovah's Witnesses, Assemblies of God, Evangelical, Church of God, Seventh-Day Adventist.]
Christianity Kenya 14,000,000 - - - 1986 East Africa (series: Library of Nations). By the editors of Time-Life Books. Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1986); pg. 8. "In Kenya, for example, almost one in three of the nation's 14 million Christians belongs to one of 200 or so African independent churches. "
Christianity Kenya - 66.00% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Kenya ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 48. "Protestants number 38%, Roman Catholics represent 28%, and supporters of traditional beliefs account for 26%... Many customs of the African population of Kenya have survived within the framework of Christian churches without conflict. Polygamy--the practice of having more than one wife--however, has caused some strain between the people of Kenya and the Christian churches. It has long been an African custom for a man to take as many wives as he can afford to support. In this way, the family continues to grow as the marriages produce many children and will help support the family when they are adults... "
Christianity Kenya 15,180,000 60.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 174. Estimates of % of population in principal religions, & est. 1997 total pop.
Christianity Kenya 17,360,000 62.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 245-246. "Location: Kenya; Population: 28 million "; "Kenya's religious heritage mirrors its ethnic history... The majority religion is Christianity, with about 37% Protestant (including Quakers) and 25% Roman Catholic; and 4% Muslim. "
Christianity Kiribati - 95.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Ethnologue Database " (viewed circa Dec. 1998) "Religion: Christian 95%, Baha'i 5% "
Christianity Kiribati 73,775 95.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Kiribati/Kiribati Protestant Church (KPC) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Kiribati... Country information: Population: 77,658... Main religions: Christianity (95%)... "
Christianity Kiribati - - - - 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Kiribati "; web page: "Religion "; Originally by Jonathan Willis-Richards. This version edited by Mike Pearson. Viewed 31 May 1999. "The major organized religion is Christianity, represented by a number of sects. A small percentage of the population follow the Bahai faith. Most of the Christian sects are involved in education; usually through the running of a secondary school... Roman Catholic... Kiribati Protestant Church... Latter-day Saints... Seventh Day Adventists... Church of God "
Christianity Korea 36 - - - 1653 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 130. "In 1653, another Dutch ship, Sparrow Hawk, shipwrecked on Cheju Island in southern Korea. Twenty-eight of the sixty-four crewmen drowned; the thirty-six survivors were captures by island authorities and sent to Seoul and elsewhere in southwestern Korea. In 1666, eight of the captives escaped after a fourteen-year imprisonment. Though there are no documented conversions of Koreans to Christianity from these contacts, one may infer from the writings of Hendrik Hamel, the Sparrow Hawk's bookkeeper, that Koreans likely took note of Christianity. "
Christianity Korea 26,000 - - - 1910 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 138. "Much of the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905) took place in what is now North Korea, especially around the Pyongyang area. During the war, the growth of the Korean Church [meaning Protestantism] accelerated. American missionaries did not flee the Korean war zone but instead continued to strengthen the Korean Church. In January 1907, the Korean Church experience a great revival that coincided with revivals [Pentecostalism] elsewhere around the globe, such as South Africa, China, and Los Angeles, California. Korea's revival started in Pyongyang. Thousands of people confessed their sins and a wave of repentance spread over the entire country. This revival was followed by a great spiritual awakening resulting in the Million Souls Movement of 1908-1910. As the Korean Church grew to over 26,000 believers, Pyongyan came to be called the Jeusalem of the East. "
Christianity Korea 100,000 - - - 1914 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 138. "The fact that many of the foreign Christian missionaries did not support the Japanese [during the Russo-Japanese War] helped the Church to grow rapidly. By 1914, the Church quadrupled in size to almost 100,000 belieers. Missionaries imparted a biblical Great Commission focus to the growing Korean Church. As a result, Korea's General Evangelical Council formed the Federal Council of Missions. Korean churches began sending missionaries to Shantung in China, Siberia in Russia, and elsewhere. "
Christianity Korea - - - - 1919 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 139. "During the First World War and its aftermath, the embers of nationalism within the Korean people burst into flames and anti-Japanese resistance increased. Christian, Confucian, Buddhist, and Ch'ondogyo leaders jointly decided in favor of a non-violent popular independence movement. "
Christianity Korea 168,000 - - - 1935 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 139. "Atrocities, torture, and persecution continued during the 1930s. Yet the Church in Korea continued to grow, with an estimated 168,000 believers by 1935. "
Christianity Korea 350,000 - 2,000
units
- 1945 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 142. "In 1945, the Communist Korean Workers' Party began the massive anti-religion campaign by systematically destroying about 2,000 churches and 400 Buddhist temples. Countless atrocities and murders were committed agains the 50,000 Catholics and 300,000 Protestants who became the first ideological targets of the new totalitarian regime. "
Christianity Korea 300,000 - - - 1945 Oberdorfer, Don. The Two Koreas: A Contemporary History; Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley (1997); pg. 49-51. "From an estimated 300,000 in North and South Korea in 1945, the number of Christians had grown rapidly by 1974 to an estimated 4.3 million in South Korea (3.5 million Protestants and 800,000 Roman Catholics). "
Christianity Korea, North - - - - 1944 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 3. "Before 1945, Korean religion was dominated by a mixture of Confucian thought, Buddhism, and shamanism... There was also a vibrant and growing Christian community... The majority of North Koreans today have never heard the name of Jesus. The knowledge of God has been obliterated for most by an Orwellian nightmare of repression, demands for total conformity, and isolation from the outside world. "
Christianity Korea, North 200,000 - - - 1953 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 146. "By 1953, roughly half of the 200,000 North Korean Christians had fled south before the highly fortified 'Demilitarized Zone'... border between the North and South became virtually impassable. "
Christianity Korea, North - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 180. "Yet where the government... had moved to stamp out the organized church and all individual Christians, as in North Korea... Christianity had become insignificant or else had been suppressed or precluded entirely. "
Christianity Korea, North - - 500
units
- 1989 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 127. "[in 1989] a North Korean Protestant pastor attended a meeting of the National Council of Churches in Washington, D.C. There, he reported that his country had 10,000 Protestants and 1,000 Catholics who worship in 500 home churches. "
Christianity Korea, North 10,000 0.05% - - 1990 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: 8/20/90 issue of GLOBAL PRAYER DIGEST); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Though once "the Jerusalem of the East, " the country of over 20,000,000 inhabitants now has only an estimated 10,000 Christians.
Christianity Korea, North - - - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page (1996 list): "Eastward shift of Christianity to post-Communist world " by Justin D. Long, 1996 (viewed 12 March 1999) "There are large underground churches in many east Asian nations which are growing rapidly, particularly in Vietnam and North Korea. "
Christianity Korea, North 30,000 - - - 1997 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 127. "[in 1989] a North Korean Protestant pastor attended a meeting of the National Council of Churches in Washington, D.C. There, he reported that his country had 10,000 Protestants and 1,000 Catholics who worship in 500 home churches. Eight years later, 1997 propaganda set the figure at 30,000. However, in a Juche system where statistics can be manufactured out of thin air, such numbers are entirely meaningless. Only the most naive observer would conclude that North Korea's anti-Christian government would willingly agree to a threefold increase in Christianity. "
Christianity Korea, North - - 3
units
- 1999 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 60. "...Christian missionaries note that Communist dictator Kim Il Sung destroyed over 1,500 churches. Today, only three churches are allowed to remain open for tourists to see North Korea's 'religious freedom.' "
Christianity Korea, North 200,000 0.83% - - 1999 Nash, Amy K. North Korea (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 9, 111. Pg. 9: "Population: 24 million "; Pg. 111: "Religious groups do still exist in the country. About 3 million North Koreans are Chundoists, 400,000 are Buddhists, 200,000 worship Christian faiths, and another 3 million follow some other form of traditional worship... Korea's traditional religions include Buddhism, shamanism, and Chundo Kyo, a native religion that combines elements of Buddhism and Christianity. "
Christianity Korea, North: Pyongyang 50,000 - - - 1935 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 139. "...by 1935. In Pyongyang alone, over 50,000 residents were Christians. "
Christianity Korea, South - 8.00% - - 1945 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 220. "Protestant Christianity in Korea is only about 100 years old. At the en fWorld War II, Christians still accounted for only about 8% of the populace. "
Christianity Korea, South 1,250,000 - - - 1962 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 146. "In the South [Korea], the church grew rapidly to about 1.25 million belieers, due to both the influx of Christian refugees [from North Korea] and many new converts. "
Christianity Korea, South 4,300,000 - - - 1974 Oberdorfer, Don. The Two Koreas: A Contemporary History; Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley (1997); pg. 49-51. "From an estimated 300,000 in North and South Korea in 1945, the number of Christians had grown rapidly by 1974 to an estimated 4.3 million in South Korea (3.5 million Protestants and 800,000 Roman Catholics). "
Christianity Korea, South - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 180. "Although in nearly every country around the rim of Asia an identifiable Christianity could be found, only in the islands of the sea, in the Philipines, in Papua New Guinea, and in South Korea was it the obvious and perfasive religion of the land. "
Christianity Korea, South - 20.00% - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 180. "In South Korea the most vigorous and dynamic churches in the modern world, having survived decades of Japanese oppression (1910-45) and two waves of communist suppression, were systematically and enthusiastically carrying out Christianization of the remaining 80 percent of the Korean people and were planning to make Korea the mission center for the whole world. "
Christianity Korea, South - 30.00% - - 1988 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "Christianity is another important tradition today. Transmitted in the 18th century, it has shown explosive growth after the end of the Japanese occupation, and currently about 30% of the population professes to be Christian. It has surpassed all of the other religions and has the most influence among the people. "
Christianity Korea, South 8,300,000 19.08% - - 1990 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 702-703. "The nation's 1990 census reported a population total of 43.5 million... "; Pg. 703: "Today, the majority of South Korea's religious population is aligned either with Mahayana Buddhism (over 11 million followers) or Christianity (6.5 million Protestants and 1.8 million Roman Catholics). "
Christianity Korea, South - 30.00% - - 1991 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992). [Orig. source: J. Lee Grady, "New Missions Strategies for a Rapidly Changing World, " National & International Religion Report 5, no. 3, 28 Jan. 1991]; pg. 224. "South Korea is about 30% Christian. A hundred years ago, it had no Protestant churches and was thought to be unreachable. "
Christianity Korea, South - 50.00% - - 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 220. "Protestant Christianity in Korea is only about 100 years old. At the en fWorld War II, Christians still accounted for only about 8% of the populace. But by 1994 the churches had recruited nearly half the population of South Korea. "
Christianity Korea, South 8,920,000 20.00% - - 1994 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Presbyterian Church of Korea (PCK) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 44.6 million... Main religions: Christianity (20%), Buddhism (30%), Shamanism (5%), Confucianism (5%), non-religious and culturalised Confucianism (40%)... "
Christianity Korea, South 22,514,918 49.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Christianity 49%, Buddhism 47%, Confucianism 3%, pervasive folk religion (shamanism), Chondogyo (Religion of the Heavenly Way), and other 1%; Total population: 45,948,811.
Christianity Korea, South - 30.00% - - 1998 *LINK* "World View: 25% of World Christians Are Pentecostal " in Salt Lake Tribune (3 Oct. 1998). [Orig. source: Assembly of God News] Some 30 percent of Koreans are Christian and 60 percent of that number are Pentecostal. Statistics also show that Christianity, rather than Buddhism, is now the major faith group in Korea.
Christianity Korea, South 9,000,000 - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 210. "First-time visitors to Korea often gaze with wonder at the many purely Christian church steeples and crosses that punctuat populated skylines. As with all the faiths, there is a discrepancy between claimed membership and government estimates. Over nine million, or by government reckoning, almost half of all Koreans who follow a particular religion, are avowed Christians. Today, Christianity plays a disproportionate role in power circles, both government and opposition, considering its small percentage of the Korean population. "
Christianity Korea, South: Seoul - - 2,050
units
- 1979 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 233. "Available statistics show that in 1979 there were 2,050 Christian churches in Seoul. By August of 1981, the Korean government's Ministry of Culture and Information estimated that there were 4,700. "
Christianity Korea, South: Seoul - - 4,700
units
- 1981 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 233. "By August of 1981, the Korean government's Ministry of Culture and Information estimated that there were 4,700. Most of these are pentecostal congregations. "
Christianity Korea, South: Seoul - - 5,000
units
- 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 222. "A reliable recent estimate says there are now more than 5,000 Christian church buildings in Seoul alone. That number, as Koreans wryly remark, even exceeds the count of coffee shops and drugstores. "
Christianity Laos 57,000 1.50% - - 1988 Diamond, Judith. Laos (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1989); pg. 120. "Population: Estimated 1988 population - 3,800,000... Religion: About 95% of the people adhere to Therevada Buddhism. Animism is practiced among the Lao Theng, and 1.5% are Christian. "
Christianity Latin America 200,000 1.50% - - 1500 C.E. Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 71-72. "Figure 2.2: Geography and statistics of Christian profesion, 1500-2000 " [showing both population in millions and percentage of total population]
Christianity Latin America 348,700,000 93.80% - - 1980 Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 71-72. "Figure 2.2: Geography and statistics of Christian profesion, 1500-2000 " [showing both population in millions and percentage of total population]
Christianity Latin America 448,008,000 96.97% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1995 "; "Christians: Followers of Jesus Christ affiliated w/ churchs (church members, incl. children: 1,791,227,000 [world total] plus persons professing in censuses or polls though not affiliated. "


Christianity, continued

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