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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Christian Churches and Churches of Christ, USA

Christian Churches and Churches of Christ, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ USA 1,213,188 - 5,228
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Christian Churches and Churches of Christ.']
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ USA 1,063,469 - 5,566
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990), 75-76. "Membership is strongest in the lower and eastern midwestern states and in Kentucky. Because of the unusual nature of the fellowship, no official membership survey has every been taken, but various estimates, questionable in accuracy, have been made. There are said to be 1,063,469 members in 5,566 congregations. Some of these churches withdrew their names from the yearbook of the Disciples in protest against the recent 'restructuring' of the denomination. "
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ USA 1,200,000 - - - 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Part of "The Christian Church (Stone-Campbell Movement) "
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ USA 1,100,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "Religions and Health Care " by Fr. J Mahoney, M.Div.; web page: "Membership Reported " (viewed 20 Feb. 1999); [Orig. source: J. Gordon Melton. Encyclopedia of American Religions, 6th edition, copyright 1999, Gale Publishing] Table: "Membership Reported "; 3 key columns: "Religious Group ", "Year ", "Membership " (which always specifies location, whether U.S., North America, or Total]; listed in table as "Christian Churches and Churches of Christ "
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ USA 1,070,616 - 1,431
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ USA 1,071,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); "last updated October 1998 " Table: "Christian Organizations "; "Membership numbers, as supplied by various denominations "
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ USA 1,071,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); "last updated October 1998 " Table: "Largest Religious Groups: The 16 US faith groups and ethical systems with memberships over 1 million are: "
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ Utah 949 0.06% 5
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 678. [Listed as 'Christian Churches and Churches of Christ.']
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ Vermont 138 0.02% 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 110. [Listed as 'Christian Churches and Churches of Christ.']
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ Virginia 39,949 0.65% 210
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 32,450. [Listed as 'Christian Churches and Churches of Christ.']
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ Washington 18,569 0.38% 66
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 14,844. [Listed as 'Christian Churches and Churches of Christ.']
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ Washington, D.C. - - 10
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns.
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ West Virginia 13,822 0.77% 93
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 11,272. [Listed as 'Christian Churches and Churches of Christ.']
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ Wisconsin 5,738 0.12% 35
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 4,516. [Listed as 'Christian Churches and Churches of Christ.']
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ world 1,070,000 - 5,000
units
- 1988 Conkin, Paul K. American Originals: Homemade Varieties of Christianity, The University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill, NC (1997); pg. 53. (Campbell-Stone movement) "The much looser CCCC has more congregations--over 5,000--and by its own 1988 count 1.07 million members. "
Christian Churches and Churches of Christ Wyoming 2,505 0.55% 17
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 1,910. [Listed as 'Christian Churches and Churches of Christ.']
Christian Churches, Alliance of USA - - - - 1999 *LINK* Kaczor, Bill (AP). "Bible College Founded For Gay Christians " in Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, June 26, 1999 (viewed online 26 June 1999). "Grace Institute Bible College & Seminary is conservative, fundamental and evangelical. It even uses some of the same texts as the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Liberty University. But there is a key difference. Most of Grace Institute's students and faculty are homosexuals. Its founder, the Rev. Jerry Stephenson, insists that being a gay or lesbian fundamentalist is not a contradiction in terms... Classes for about 10 students are held two nights a week at the Family of God Worship Center in Cedar Grove [Florida]... Stephenson said the center is affiliated with the conservative, predominantly homosexual Alliance of Christian Churches. Some 25 other students take courses by correspondence or at satellite locations. These have been, or soon will be, operating in Phoenix; Denver; Ontario, Calif.; Dayton, Ohio; Lexington, Ky.; Wichita, Kan.; Winston-Salem, N.C.; and the Florida cities of Fort Lauderdale and Daytona Beach, Stephenson said. "
Christian City Church Australia 1,081 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census.
Christian Coalition USA 450,000 - - - 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 291. "Mr. Robertson's Christian Coalition--with its 450,000 members and its $12 million-a-year budget... "
Christian Coalition USA 1,500,000 - - - 1994 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 284. "The Christian Coalition, the major expression of the Religious Right, claimed in 1994 to have 1.5 million dues-paying members and the support of up to 20 percent of Americans. "
Christian Coalition USA 1,500,000 - - - 1995 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998); pg. 79. "Even regarding its membership rolls, the [Christian] Coalition has played fast and loose with its numbers. By 1995, the Coalition claimed it had over 1.5 million members, and the ever-increasing figure was routinely touted as evidence of the Coalition's unquestioned influence. The number was suspicious, though, because 'membership' entails a minimum annual dues of $20, and all dues-paying members receive the Christian American magazine. At the end of 1994, the Christian American reported... a paid circulation of about 353,000. Perhaps the Coalition included in its projections several additional family members for each dues-paying member. "
Christian Coalition USA - - - - 1999 *LINK* Davidson, Lee. "Hatch wins over skeptical Christian group " in Deseret News, 2 Oct. 1999 (v. online 3 Oct. 99). "WASHINGTON ?The Christian Coalition seemed cool toward Sen. Orrin Hatch. Applause was light... Then Hatch finally addressed head-on an unspoken concern: Could the religious right really support a Mormon for president? And when he finally confronted it ?plus expressed his personal belief in Jesus Christ ?he received an enthusiastic standing ovation from most of those attending... 'I wanted them to know I am proud of my religion,' Hatch said after the speech. 'One minister came up to me and said, 'I was wrong about Mormons, and I'm glad you did what you did.' ' The speech came during the 'Road to Victory' convention of the Christian Coalition in Washington... He recounted what he told the first reporter who asked him about that. 'Well, I can't do anything about bigots or bigotry, but I can do a lot about people who are misinformed.' He added, 'I take my Christian faith very, very seriously.' "
Christian Coalition USA 2,200,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Power, Stephen (Gannett News Service). "Shaky Christian Coalition Faces Uncertain Future " in Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, June 12, 1999 (viewed online 12 June 1999). "Christian Coalition officials scoff at suggestions their movement is in trouble... Tate... said his group's membership has increased by a quarter of a million people over the past two years to 2.2 million. "
Christian Community and Brotherhood of Reformed Doukhobors British Columbia 3,000 - - 1
country
1982 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 327. "Christian Community and Brotherhood of Reformed Doukhobors (Sons of Freedom)... Membership: Not reported. There are several thousand Sons of Freedom primarily at Kerstova and Gilpin, British Columbia. In 1982 they were reported to have a congregation of 2,250 members near Krestova. "
Christian Community and Brotherhood of Reformed Doukhobors Canada 1,000 - - 1
country
1932 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Other European Free Traditions; pg. 326. "Christian Community and Brotherhood of Reformed Doukhobors (Sons of Freedom)... Cresent Valley, BC, Canada... better known as the Sons of Freedom, emerged within the larger Doukhobor community in Canada in the early twentieth century. They were the ardent supporters of Peter Verigin (d. 1924)... During his tenure in office the number of the Sons of Freedom greatly expanded, and by the early 1930s, there were more than 1,000. The actual break with the larger community came in 1933... " [Note: This group is listed as a separate entry from "Sons of Freedom (Doukhobors) ", who have their headquarters listed as Krestova, BC, Canada.]
Christian Community and Brotherhood of Reformed Doukhobors Canada 2,108 - 1
unit
- 1986 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 244-247. Table 1: Canadian Current Statistics. (# of adherents is from table's "inclusive membership " column, not the sometimes smaller "full communicant or confirmed members " col.) Listed in table as "Christian Community and Brotherhood of Reformed Doukhobors. "
Christian Congregation USA 57 - 1
unit
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 341. Table: "...the leading holiness groups in the United States at the present time are as follows: " [Table lists figures for "Churches " and "Members " for 28 groups.]
Christian Congregation USA 106,831 - 1,456
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 76. "Churches and pastorates are now located in every state in the union; the church still remains strongest, however, in the areas where Barton Stone preached... Kentucky, the Carolinas, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Texas... Polity is congregational... There are 106,831 members in 1,456 churches or local congregations. "
Christian Congregation USA 110,716 - 1,447
units
- 1991 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from table's "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Christian Congregation, Inc.. "
Christian Congregation USA 113,259 - 1,431
units
- 1995 *LINK* web site for Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches (accessed 1998); [Orig. source: Source: Kenneth B. Bedell, editor, Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches, annual.] Table: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches: U.S. Religious Bodies with more than 60,000 Members "; "...prepared for the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census... for the 1997 edition of the Statistical Abstract of the U.S. "; [Listed as "The Christian Congregation, Inc. "]
Christian Congregation USA 113,259 - 1,957
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
Christian Congregation USA 114,685 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religions and Health Care " by Fr. J Mahoney, M.Div.; web page: "Membership Reported " (viewed 20 Feb. 1999); [Orig. source: J. Gordon Melton. Encyclopedia of American Religions, 6th edition, copyright 1999, Gale Publishing] Table: "Membership Reported "; 3 key columns: "Religious Group ", "Year ", "Membership " (which always specifies location, whether U.S., North America, or Total]; listed in table as "Christian Congregation "
Christian Congregation USA 115,881 - 1,438
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Christian Congregation, Inc.
Christian Congregation USA 112,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); "last updated October 1998 " Table: "Christian Organizations "; "Membership numbers, as supplied by various denominations "
Christian Congregation world 57 - 1
unit
1
country
1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 160. "Christian Congregation: A holiness sect, exclusive in nature, organized at Kokomo, Ind., in 1899. It has dwindled to one church with 57 members. "
Christian Congregation world 110,716 - 1,447
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Formed in Indiana in 1887.
Christian Defense League Louisiana - - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 81. "The Christian Defense League, is an extreme anti-Semitic group based in Louisiana that is dedicated to organizing white Christians primarily through its various publications: they are also followers of [Christian] Identity philosophy. " [This group is distinct from the 'Christian Patriots Defense League' of John Harrell.]
Christian Fundamentalist Cyprus 500 - - - 1972 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1972); pg. 15. "In Cyprus, fundamentalistic Protestants alone are present, and they number only a few hundred adherents. "
Christian Fundamentalist Laos - Hmong 20,000 20.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 261-263. "Hmong: Location: Southern China; Viet Nam; Laos; Thailand; Population: About 4 to 6 million; Religion: Animism; some fundamentalist Protestant Christianity "; Pg. 262: "There are... 230,000 [Hmong] in north and central Laos, and around 100,000 in northern Thailand... "; Pg. 263: "In Thailand and Laos, 10-20% of the hmong have responded to missionaries and adopted fundamentalist Protestant Christianity. This is seen by other Hmong as a threat to clan solidarity, since Christians destroy their spirit altars, refuse to sacrifice at funerals, and feel less bound by clan ties. "
Christian Fundamentalist Laos - Hmong 46,000 20.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 261-263. "Hmong: Location: Southern China; Viet Nam; Laos; Thailand; Population: About 4 to 6 million; Religion: Animism; some fundamentalist Protestant Christianity "; Pg. 262: "There are... 230,000 [Hmong] in north and central Laos, and around 100,000 in northern Thailand... "; Pg. 263: "In Thailand and Laos, 10-20% of the hmong have responded to missionaries and adopted fundamentalist Protestant Christianity. This is seen by other Hmong as a threat to clan solidarity, since Christians destroy their spirit altars, refuse to sacrifice at funerals, and feel less bound by clan ties. "
Christian Fundamentalist Latin America - - - - 1998 Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. "Religion " in The Future Now: Predicting the 21st Century. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1998); pg. 62. "'Christian fundamentalism' is becoming as much a political term as 'Islamic fundamentalism'. In parts of Latin America, radical Protestant sects are already guilty of trying to mobilize congregatios in support of military-backed dictatorships and hierarchies of wealth and race. "
Christian Fundamentalist United Kingdom: Northern Ireland - - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996); pg. 297. "Protestant fundamentalists in Northern Ireland claim that God wants them to control the Catholics, while the Catholic minority says it is they who have divine claims. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA - - - - 1923 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 93. "The hostility between the cities and the countryside could also be seen within Protestantism. By the early 1920s there was a profound split between the denominations that appealed to urban, middle-class Americans and those that attracted their rural and small-town counterparts. (The spit involved soocio-economic levels as well as geography. Many who held rural and small-town views lived and worked in cities, where fundamentalist churches often flourished.) The controversy centered on the nature of the Bible. The more sophisticated Christians tended to accept the Scriptures as vital and inspired by God but containing human errors and explanations of nature that had to be rejected in lght of scientific findings. Their opponents took the older view that that Bible came directly from God and was infallible. These 'fundamentalists' abhored much of modern life. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA - - - - 1923 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 93. "These 'fundamentalists' [a conservative Protestant sub-group that was emerging more prominently in the U.S. in the 1920s] abhored much of modern life. They were especially critical of the 'higher criticism' of the Scriptures taught in the seminaries of the larger denominations and they passionately opposed Charles Darwin's theory of evolution. The Book of Genesis, they argued, contained a literal and inerrant account of God's creatio of man, and all other explanations were to be rejected and condemned.

Fundamentalist evangelists were especially effetive in the South and parts of the West. Billy Sunday, a one-tme professional baseball player and YMCA worker, conducted more than three hundred revivals during his career, preaching to an estimated 100 million people. Aimee Semple McPherson, an attractive ex-missionary with a flair for theatrics, won a large following in Los Angeles. The successors of Dwight Moody had a higly effective ministry in Chicago. "

Christian Fundamentalist USA - - - - 1923 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 94. "Still, the fundamentalist outlook was declining within Protestantism. Large numbers of Methodists, Baptists, Presbyterians, and Episcopalians, especially in the North, welcomed modern life and accepted a Christianity that stressed reasonableness, tolerance, and good works. Fundamentalistts knew they were losing ground in the New Era, and this fear intensified their efforts.

In 1925 the Tennessee legislature outlawed the teaching of evolution in the state's schools and colleges. The American Civil Liberties Union decided to make this a test case, and supported a 24-year-old high-school teacher John T. Scopes when he challenged the law. The ACLU hired the celebrated attorney Clarence Darrow to defend Scopes. William Jennings Bryan, the elderly politician and orator, offered his services to the state. With over a hundred newspaper reporters on the scene, along with radio microphones and movie cameras, the 'monkey trial' became one of the decade's foremost 'media events.' "

Christian Fundamentalist USA - - - - 1923 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 94. "The contrast between Darrow's skeptical rationalism and Bryan's simple fundamnentalism revealed to millions the difference between modern America and its provincial critics. For example, a zoologist summoned by Darrow drew gasps from locals by estimating that life had begun about 600 million years earlier. Bryan, on the other hand, dated creation at 4004 BC and the Flood at about 2348 BC, estimates made before the flowering of modern science. In the end, Scopes was convicted, fined $100, and released by the state Supreme Court on a technicality. The teaching of evolution remained illegal in Tennessee until 1968. Still, the ACLU emerged victorious ainthe Scopes trial, for all over the country sophisticated and influential people ridiculed fundamentalism and those who espoused it. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA - - - - 1945 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 269. "In the popular mind the drive for laws prohibiting the teaching of evolution in the public schools was the center of the fundamentalist movement. The 1925 trial of John Scopes in Tennessee for teaching evolution was the climax of this aspect of the movement. During the 30s and 40s, the fundamentalist movement largely idsappeared from public view and psent its time building its own institutions. In the late 1940s, it emerged from this self-imposed isolation to begin playing a major role in church affairs. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 30,000,000 - - - 1956 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 958. "Though at this time [1956] the editor of the association's official organ estimated that half of the country's sixty million Protestants were still of Fundamentalist tendency, the actual membership of the NAE was heavily... Holiness/Pentecostal... "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 27,000 - - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 15-17. Table 1-2: Self-Described Adherence of U.S. Adult Population 1990. Phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by Graduate School of City U. of New York.
Christian Fundamentalist USA 60,000,000 - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 292-293. Pg. 292: "The 60 million adults who describe themselves as born-again Christians constitute such a huge market that it is almost too large to target. "; Pg. 293: "By head count, New Agers are... maybe 10 or 12 million... They are still completely outnumbered by the fundamentalists, at around 60 million. " [The author here appear to use 'fundamentalist' as a synonym for 'born-again Christian', which really is a non-standard usage at this time. In the first half of the 20th century, 'fundamentalist' referred to this group of conservative Protestants. But after the Scopes trial of 1924, the term went out of favor and far fewer U.S. Christians describe themselves as fundamentalists. Fundamentalism, with it's contemporary defintion, is best viewed as a sub-set of the Evangelical, or conservative Protestant, faction.]
Christian Fundamentalist USA - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 279. "A recent article in America, an unofficial Jesuit publication, offered this description of fundamentalism: 'a reactionary emotional movement that develops within cultures experiencing social crisis.'

Humanist magazine was even harsher: 'authoritarian, intolerant, and compulsive abot imposing itself upon the rest of society. It is a mindset which sees everything in black and white and for which compromise is alien.'

If these characterizations are accurate, why is fundamentalism so popular?

In times of great social change, the same times when millennial movements spring up, fundamentalist religion spells out the answers for people--so that need not make decisions alone. "

Christian Fundamentalist USA - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 279-280. "Fundamentalism's most visible strength is its effective use of the media, an outlandish, incongruous, perfect balance: the hard edge of technology in service to the high touch of religion.

- Before falling from grace, Jimmy Swaggart had broadcast in 140 countries weekly and in fifteen different languages. He claimed to reachone third of the planet. Jim and Tammy Bakker's PTL cable TV network reached 12 million households.

- Jerry Falwell's TV shows reached 610,000 households in 168 markets across the U.S.; his 1987 TV income: $91 million.

- Robert Schuller is the leading TV evangelist. his Crystal Cathedral claims 10,000 members; many more watch the show on TV. "

Christian Fundamentalist USA - 8.33% - - 1992 Marty, Martin E. & R. Scott Appleby. The Glory and the Power: The Fundamentalist Challenge to the Modern World; Boston: Beacon Press (1992); pg. 197. "one can safely estimate that at least every eighteenth American (and as many as one in twelve) is a Protestant fundamentalist. " [Many now favor term 'neo-Evangelical']
Christian Fundamentalist USA 4,500,000 - - - 1997 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997); pg. 282. "Fundamentalists, numbering perhaps 4.5 million, comprise an extreme right-wing subculture of evangelicalism. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA - 15.00% - - 1999 Gallagher, Winifred. Working on God. New York: Random House (1999); pg. 105. "Despite the media attention they attract, research over the past twenty years shows that the number of fundamentalist American Christians isn't nearly as large as is often assumed, hasn't increased, and seems to be slightly declining; surveys indicate they represent around 15% of the population. The common misperception of the movement's size owes much to the combination of its stridency and the mistaken tendency to lump traditional, fervent 'born-again' evangelical Christians together and assume that all are fundamentalists. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA - Spanish-speaking - 17.25% - - 1987 Greeley, Andrew M. The Catholic Myth: The Behavior and Beliefs of American Catholics. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1990); pg. 121. "In the first five years of the GSS (1972-77), 16% of Spanish origin respondents were Protestant (and 7% some other religion or no religion). In the five most recent years (1982-87), 23% were Protestant... More than three-fourths of the Spanish-origin Protestants are either Baptists or fundamentalists. "
Christian Fundamentalist Utah: Sandy: Alta High School 14 0.45% - - 2001 *LINK* Mims, Bob. "Seminary in Utah, Not Just for Mormons " in Salt Lake Tribune. (5 May 2001) SANDY -- Use the term "released time " in Utah, and the image that springs to mind is an off-campus classroom packed with teens escaping the school day's secular academics to be steeped in LDS Church scriptures, doctrine and history. But at Alta High School, released time isn't just for Mormon youth anymore. Every other day, 14 students board a van, not for nearby Alta LDS Seminary -- where 80 percent of their 2,500 classmates go -- but for a short ride to Sandy's Grace Community Bible Church. The program offered there by the 300-member nondenominational fundamentalist evangelical Christian church is one of a handful of so-called "non-LDS seminaries " operating in the state.
Christian Fundamentalist world - - - - 1992 Bloom, Harold. The American Religion: The Emergence of the Post-Christian Nation. New York: Simon & Schuster (1992); pg. 223. "Christian Fundamentalism essentially is a North American phenomenon; except for the U.S. and Canada, it has had an indigenous life only in Ulster. Its other worldwide manifestations tend to be exported from the U.S. Yet I cannot regard it as anything but a parody... Its spiritual content... is difficult to locate. "
Christian Fundamentalist - gay USA - - - - 1999 *LINK* Kaczor, Bill (AP). "Bible College Founded For Gay Christians " in Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, June 26, 1999 (viewed online 26 June 1999). "CEDAR GROVE, Fla. -- Grace Institute Bible College & Seminary is conservative, fundamental and evangelical. It even uses some of the same texts as the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Liberty University. But there is a key difference. Most of Grace Institute's students and faculty are homosexuals. Its founder, the Rev. Jerry Stephenson, insists that being a gay or lesbian fundamentalist is not a contradiction in terms... Classes for about 10 students are held two nights a week at the Family of God Worship Center in Cedar Grove, a small town adjacent to Panama City. Stephenson said the center is affiliated with the conservative, predominantly homosexual Alliance of Christian Churches. Some 25 other students take courses by correspondence or at satellite locations. These have been, or soon will be, operating in Phoenix; Denver; Ontario, Calif.; Dayton, Ohio; Lexington, Ky.; Wichita, Kan.; Winston-Salem, N.C.; and the Florida cities of Fort Lauderdale and Daytona Beach, Stephenson said. "
Christian Identity Movement Arkansas - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Christian Identity Movement California - - 2
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Christian Identity Movement Colorado - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Christian Identity Movement Florida - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Christian Identity Movement Idaho - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
Christian Identity Movement Indiana - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "


Christian Identity Movement, continued

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