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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Chin, India: Mizoram

Chin, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Chin Myanmar - - - - 1997 Leibo, Steven A. East, Southeast Asia, and the Western Pacific 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 91. "Population: 45 million... Ethnic Background:... Chin and Kachin (5%) in the western mountain and extreme north... "
Chin Myanmar 1,200,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 163-164. "The Chin people as a whole number about two million. In Myanmar (Burma), 400,000 live in the Chin state and about 800,000 Chin are scattered in other parts of Burma... " [NOTE: This statistic is of cultural/ethnic affiliation, NOT a count of current practitioners of traditional Chin religion, as almost all Chin today are Christian.]
Chin Myanmar: Chin 400,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 163-164. "The Chin people as a whole number about two million. In Myanmar (Burma), 400,000 live in the Chin state and about 800,000 Chin are scattered in other parts of Burma... " [NOTE: This statistic is of cultural/ethnic affiliation, NOT a count of current practitioners of traditional Chin religion, as almost all Chin today are Christian.]
Chin world 2,000,000 - - 3
countries
1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 163-164. "The Chin people as a whole number about two million. In Myanmar (Burma), 400,000 live in the Chin state and about 800,000 Chin are scattered in other parts of Burma. In India, another 400,000 live in Mizoram state, about 200,000 live in Manipur state, and some 200,000 are scattered throughout other parts of India. The Chin population in Bangladesh is about 50,000... The Chin were once animists... They also believed in God, whom they called Pathian... Today, after the influx of Christian missionaries during the colonial period, the majority of Chin (estimated 90%) have joined the Presbyterian, Baptist, and Catholic churches. As a result, most of their traditional religious beliefs have been abandoned. "
China Christian Council China - - 22,230
units
- 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994); pg. 132. "At a conservative figure, there are at least 6,375 churches and 15,855 meeting-points opened under CCC auspices. In addition there are probably tens of thousands of house-churches meeting independently. "
China Christian Council China 12,000,000 - - - 1999 Associated Press. Dateline: Beijing. Date: "10.20 a.m. ET (1521 GMT) January 25, 1999 "; Posted to Nurel-1 newsgroup (nurel-l@listserv.ucalgary.ca) on 26 Jan. 1999. "The China Christian Council, the umbrella organization overseeing the government-sanctioned non-denominational Protestant churches, counts more than 12 million Protestants. Foreign supporters of the underground churches claim their adherents are ten times the official figure. "
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 82 - - - 1982 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 141 - - - 1983 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 264 - - - 1984 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 427 - - - 1985 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 679 - - - 1986 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 1,214 - - - 1987 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 1,527 - - - 1988 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 1,863 - - - 1989 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 2,332 - - - 1990 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 2,810 - - - 1991 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 3,297 - - - 1992 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 3,844 - - - 1993 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 4,374 - - - 1994 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 5,034 - - - 1995 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 6,172 - - - 1996 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council China: Qinghai: Xining 6,780 - - - 1997 *LINK* China Christian Council web site (1998) Table: "Membership Statistics For The Church In Xining " (Xining is the capital of Qinghai povince)
China Christian Council world 5,000,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* Doogue, Edmund (Ecumenical News International). "German Churches Contribute Much More to WCC than Others " in Presbyterian News Service, 27 Sept. 1996 (viewed online 11 March 1999). "Those of the WCC's biggest member churches that in 1995 did not pay their membership contribution, or paid only a fraction of what they were supposed to, include... the China Christian Council (5 million)... "
Chinese China 50,000,000 - - - 742 C.E. Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 36. "China's population was counted for the first time about 2,000 years ago, in 4 AD. By 742 AD, during the Tang dynasty, China's population was just over 50 million people. "
Chinese China 100,000,000 - - - 1250 C.E. Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 36. "At around the same time as the invasion of Genghis Khan and the Mongols, around AD 1250, the 100 million [total population] mark was probably exceeded for the first time. "
Chinese China 200,000,000 - - - 1750 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 36. "At... around AD 1250, the 100 million [total population] mark was probably exceeded for the first time. By the middle of the 18th century, the number had doubled... "
Chinese China 400,000,000 - - - 1850 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 36. "...in 1850, a [total Chinese] population of 400 million people had been reached. "
Chinese China 500,000,000 - - - 1946 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 36. "Shortly after World War II, there were half a billion people in China. "
Chinese China 800,000,000 - - - 1982 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 36. "Shortly after World War II, there were half a billion people in China. Between the mid 1960s and the early 1980s, China's population increased by over 300 million, more than the total population of either the United States or the former Soviet Union. "
Chinese China 1,200,000,000 - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 36. "Today's population [of China] is over 1.2 billion people, nearly 20 percent of humanity. In recent years, China's population has increased annually by about 15 million people. "
Chinese Hong Kong - - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 199. "Almost all of Hong Kong and much of Taiwan is Chinese... "
Chinese Indonesia - 2.00% - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 200. "In Indonesia, the Chinese are just 2% of the population, but they account for up to three-quarters of private domestic capital and control seventeen of the twenty-five biggest business groups. "
Chinese Malaysia - 33.30% - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 200. "In Malaysia one-third of the population is ethnic Chinese, and they retain tight control of the economy. For decades, the government attempted to force transfer to the majority Malays before finally giving up. "
Chinese Philippines - 1.00% - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 200. "In the Philippines, ethnic Chinese form only 1% of the population, yet their companies comprise 35% of the sales of Philippine companies and two-thirds of the fifty largest enterprises. "
Chinese Singapore - 75.00% - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 199. "Almost all of Hong Kong and much of Taiwan is Chinese; so are three-quarters of Singaporeans. "
Chinese Taiwan - - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 199. "Almost all of Hong Kong and much of Taiwan is Chinese... "
Chinese Thailand - 10.00% - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 200. "In Thailand, the Chinese account for just one-tenth of the population, but they own 90% of the commercial and manufacturing assets and half the capital in domestic banks. "
Chinese Tibet 7,500,000 55.56% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Tibet " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Tibet has an estimated population of about 6 million Tibetans and 7.5 million Chinese settlers. "
Chinese world 1,200,000,000 20.00% - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 36. "Today's population [of China] is over 1.2 billion people, nearly 20 percent of humanity. "
Chinese world - except China 55,000,000 - - - 1996 Knoke, William. Bold New World: The Essential Road Map to the Twenty-First Century. New York: Kodansha International (1996), Chapter 10: "The Global Tribes "; pg. 199. "The Chinese were able merchants, and in time some came to settle in the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam--every land that forms the South China Sea basin. The Chinese diaspora further spread under the yoke of European colonialism, and to North America... Ethnic Chinese now dominate trade and investment in every country in eastern Asia except Japan and Korea. They have the most capital, the best connections, and the best access to information to put regional deals together, superior to any other group in the world. These dispersed Chinese are the backbone of a new and vitalized regional economy. Today, 55 million ethnic Chinese live outside the People's Republic if China, and while they have developed into distinct cultural groups, each sporting somewhat local characteristics, the sinews tying them to a common 'Chineseness' remain strong. "
Chinese Baptist Convention Taiwan 17,162 - 152
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China - - - - 1695 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2080. "A register of the Jewish congregation compiled at the end of the 17th century shows that many Jews took Chinese Mohammedans and other Chinese as their wives. By the 20th century the Chinese Jewish community had been almost completely assimilated. "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China: Kaifeng - - 1
unit
- 1163 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2080. "A Jewish place of worship or temple was built in Kaifeng in 1163 AD. "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China: Kaifeng - - 1
unit
- 1163 C.E. Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 171. "The earliest positive date for Jews in Kaifeng is the year 1163, the date given by one inscription for the founding of their synagogue. But it is reasonable to assume they had already lived there for several decades. "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China: Kaifeng 1,000 - - - 1605 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 169. "By Ricci's days Jews had already lived in China for hundreds of years. They formed a thriving community of nearly one thousand in their own quarter of Kaifeng. "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China: Kaifeng - - - - 1642 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 179. "At the height of Jewish prosperity, in 1642, the Yellow river swept through Kaifeng in one of its worst floods ever. The synagogue was swept away and with it most of the Torah scrolls. Many Jews were among the hundreds of thousands who died in the catastrophe. Only a few hundred Jewish families survived. "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China: Kaifeng 50 - - - 1725 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 177-178. "In the early 1700s Jesuit missionaries... catalogued symptoms of the Jewish decline... Only foty to fifty men came to the synagogue for holidays, and barely a minyan for the Sabbath. "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China: Kaifeng - - 1
unit
- 1850 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 187-188. "Miraculously, Finn's letter was not only received by answered. A Chinese Jew named Chao Nien-tsu sent a reply to the consul in 1850... Chao painted a gloomy picture of Jewish life in Kaifeng, on the verge of disappearing entirely. He described himself as one of the few Jews who still cared about their religion... the synagogue was crumbling. "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China: Kaifeng 400 - - - 1851 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 187-188. "The Chinese delegates made a second trip in 1851. They spent two weeks in Kaifeng, long enough to estimate the Jewish population at three to four hundred. This time they returned with six Torah scrolls and assorted other manuscripts, including the memorial book. They also brought back two Jews in person. Both had been circumcised,... "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China: Kaifeng - - - - 1866 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2080. "By the middle of the 19th century Chinese Judaism had almost disappeared; the temple no longer stood, no one could read Hebrew, services were no longer held and religious observances had ceased. Of the once prosperous large community, there remained only a few poor families who could not afford to rebuild their place of worship. By 1966 the synagogue buildings had entirely disappeared; in 1914 the temple site was sold to a Christian mission. "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China: Kaifeng 0 - - - 1932 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 191. "In a series of meetings in 1919 [Bishop william White, head of the Canadian Anglican Mission in Kaifeng] tried to reorganize the Jewish community, with no success. He called his last meeting in 1932 to introdue them to a visiting American Jew [who] wrote: 'They know they are Jews, but konw nothing of Judaism. They realize they are Chinese, completely assimilated...' "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China: Kaifeng 0 - - - 1980 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 191. "The most recent visitor was a UPI reporter in early 1980. She found a few dozen people who knew they were descended from Jews. "
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng China: Kaifeng 0 - - - 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 170. "...China's Jews... prospered for another century or so [after 1605] but began losing their grip on Judaism... last rabbi died [c. 1805]; the synagogue was torn down [c. 1860]. By then the Jews could no longer read Hebrew or remember any but a few oddly misshapen rituals. A few of them converted to Islam or other religions, but most simply blended into their Chinese surroundings... To this day there are a few hundred residents of Kaifeng who can say, 'I am descended from Jews.' But that is exactly what they are. It has been a long time since anyone in Kaifeng has been able to say, 'I am a Jew.' "
Chinese traditional religion Africa 12,000 0.00% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1995 "; "Chinese folk religionists: Followers of traditional Chinese religions (local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoism, universism, divination, some Buddhist elements. "
Chinese traditional religion Africa 13,000 0.00% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1996 "; "Chinese folk religionists: Followers of traditional Chinese religions (local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoism, universism, divination, some Buddhist elements. "
Chinese traditional religion Africa 13,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "Geography of Religions " (Geography Department of Morehead State University); web page: "Geography of Taoism " (viewed 1 July 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 1996.] Table: "Geography of Taoism ". "The figures of distribution listed below are for all traditional Chinese religionists, including local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoists, divination, as well as some Buddhist elements. "
Chinese traditional religion Africa 33,000 0.00% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 " [Listed in table as 'Chinese folk religionists': Followers of traditional Chinese religion (local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoism, universism, divination, some Buddhist elements).]
Chinese traditional religion Asia 224,628,000 6.50% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1995 "; "Chinese folk religionists: Followers of traditional Chinese religions (local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoism, universism, divination, some Buddhist elements. "
Chinese traditional religion Asia 220,652,992 6.28% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1996 "; "Chinese folk religionists: Followers of traditional Chinese religions (local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoism, universism, divination, some Buddhist elements. "
Chinese traditional religion Asia 186,816,992 - - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "Geography of Religions " (Geography Department of Morehead State University); web page: "Geography of Taoism " (viewed 1 July 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 1996.] Table: "Geography of Taoism ". "The figures of distribution listed below are for all traditional Chinese religionists, including local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoists, divination, as well as some Buddhist elements. "
Chinese traditional religion Asia 377,795,008 10.53% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 " [Listed in table as 'Chinese folk religionists': Followers of traditional Chinese religion (local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoism, universism, divination, some Buddhist elements).]
Chinese traditional religion Australia 3,815 2.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Categories combined for this figure: Taoism (2,981); Ancestor Veneration (653); Confucianism (578); Chinese Religions not further defined (257)]
Chinese traditional religion China - - - - 960 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 164. "CHINESE POPULAR RELIGION. The earliest historical sources note a variety of religious practices and beliefs, including ancestor veneration, fertility cults, sacrifices to spirits of sacred objects and places, belief in ghosts, exorcism, divination, and the activities of spirit-mediums. By the Sung dynasty (A.D. 960-1279), these traditions had blended together with Buddhist ideas of karma and purgatoy ad Taoist charms and methods of ritual renewal to form the beginnings of modern popular religion. This complex aggregate can be defined by its locatio in the midst of ordinary social life, its pantheon of personified deities... its characteristic specialists and rituals. "
Chinese traditional religion China - - - - 1000 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Taoism; pg. 184. "Buddhist teachers had already begun to trickle into China as early as the 1st century AD... They were successful in passing on the dharma... the Pure Land school grew quickly among the Chinese masses. By the 11th century, Taoist and Buddhist ideas had merged with folk practices to create a popular religion that survives to this day. "
Chinese traditional religion China - - - - 1350 C.E. Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 42. "The original religion of the people actualy focused on the worship of natural forces. Later, the people began to worship the Jade Emperor, a figure from Daoism who became the highest god in the popular religion after the fourteenth century. "


Chinese traditional religion, continued

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