Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Chao Fa, USA

Chao Fa, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Chapel Hill Harvester/Cathedral of Holy Spirit Georgia: Atlanta 2,500 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Atlanta, GA; pastor Earl Paulk.
Chapel on North Forest Road New York 3,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Williamsville, NY; pastor James Andrews.
Chapel, The Ohio 4,500 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table, grouped by state, columns for city, state, "size " (avg. weekly attendance), etc. From study finding all U.S. megachurches (congreg. w/ "consistent weekly attendance of at least 2,000 persons "); "The Chapel ", an independent in Akron, Ohio, pastor Knute Larson.
Charismatic Episcopal Church world - - 400
units
9
countries
1998 *LINK* official church web page Christianity:Catholic:Anglican:Episcopal:Charismatic Episcopal:
"Over 400 churches, both in the United States and internationally, have joined the CEC in the last five years "; based on web page, they are in USA, Philippines, Kenya, Estonia, Hong Kong, England, Germany, Spain & France.
Charismatic movement USA - - - - 1979 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 162. "CHARISMATIC MOVEMENT. A movement within the traditional Christian denominations which emphasizes the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Beginning in the major Protestant denominations about 1960, the movement reached the Roman Catholic churches in 1966. By the end of the 1970s the 'renewal,' as it is called, had entered every major Christian denomination. The charismatic movement represents the spread of Pentecostalism into the 'mainline' churches. "
Charismatic movement USA 75,000 - - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 15-17. Table 1-2: Self-Described Adherence of U.S. Adult Population 1990. Phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by Graduate School of City U. of New York. [Those who stated 'Charismatic' when asked to identify their religious preference.]
Charismatic movement world 92,333,336 - - - 1980 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 279. "Worldwide where are some 100 million Pentecostals... In just ten years the charismatic movement has tripled to 277 million globally. "
Charismatic movement world 277,000,000 - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 279. "Worldwide where are some 100 million Pentecostals... In just ten years the charismatic movement has tripled to 277 million globally. "
Charismatic movement world 300,000,000 - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 270. "At the dawn of the third millennium there are unmistakable signs of a worldwide multidenominational religious revival... The worldwide charismatic movement has tripld in the last decade to nearly 300 million, including millions of Roman Catholics. "
Charismatic movement world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "CHARISMATIC MOVEMENT: a religious revival movement which started in the 1950s and took form in the early 1960s spreading PENTECOSTAL type experiences of the GIFTS OF THE SPIRIT from PENTECOSTAL CHURCHES to mainline DENOMINATIONS. It is associated with the work of David DU PLESSIS, Dennis BENNETT and Demos SHAKARIAN, the founder of the FULL GOSPEL BUSINESSMENS' ASSOCIATION. The Charismatic Movement is a worldwide phenomena and has served to bring many non-Western cultural practices, such as the emphasis on HEALING, the idea of PRAYER MOUNTAINS, into Western CHRISTIANITY. "
Charismatic Word North Carolina: New Hanover County - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* web site (1998): Wilmington Morning Star (N. Carolina newspaper); Special/Thursday, Aug. 20, 1998 "in New Hanover County... This list of active religious groups is based primarily on Southern Bell's Yellow Pages and the Morning Star's weekly list of worship services " [List of churches & # of congregations]
Charleston Baptists South Carolina - - - - 1766 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 96. "By 1762, the Philadelphia Baptist Association had grown to 29 churches with more than 4,000 members... Following the pattern set by this first co-operating group of Baptist churches, other groups formed themselves into associations for united efforts and mutual benefit. The second such association was made by congregations of the Charleston, South Carolina, area, grouping about the Old First Baptist Church. Next came the Sandy Creek Baptists in North Carolina in 1758 and Ketockton Baptist Association in Virginia in 1766. "
Charleston Baptists USA - - - - 1900 Leonard, Bill J. God's Last and Only Hope: The Fragmentation of the Southern Baptist Convention. Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdman's Publishing Co. (1990); pg. 32-33. "Shurden charted 'four distinct traditions' that existed among Baptists in the South and that became part of the denominational makeup after 1845. Shurden called the first strain the Charleston Tradition, after the Baptists who established the First Baptist Church, Charleston, South Carolina... During the 19th and early-20th centuries representatives of the Charleston Tradition occupied prominent Baptist pulpits in Richmond, Augusta, Atlanta, and other urban areas of the South. "
Charrua Uruguay - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "
Chastacosta North America - Pacific Coast 5,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Chetco, Mishikhwutmetunne, Tutuni
Chastacosta world 5,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Chetco, Mishikhwutmetunne, Tutuni
Chatot North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 1,500 - - - 1674 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Chatot world 1,500 - - - 1674 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Chechens Chechnia 1,000,000 83.33% - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Chechnya is situated in the eastern part of Caucasia and borders to the south to Georgia. The republic has a little more than 1.2 million inhabitants of which 1 million are Chechens. Most Chechens are Muslims. Chechnya proclaimed independence from the Russian Federation in 1991. Russia sent military forces to Chechnya in 1994. The war lasted for almost two years. In August 1996 a cease- fire agreement was signed. "
Chechens Chechnia 1,000,000 83.33% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Chechen " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The population of Chechnia is more than 1.2 million, of which one million are Chechen. The remainder consists mainly of Russians, Ingush and other North Caucasians? "
Chechens Soviet Union 2,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Chechen " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The population of Chechnia is more than 1.2 million, of which one million are Chechen... More than 1000,000 live in other areas of the Caucasus, Central Asia and part of the Russian Federation " [This appears to be a typo/error. We think it should say 100,000, instead.]
Chehalis North America - Pacific Coast 1,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Cowlitz, Humptulips
Chehalis world 1,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Cowlitz, Humptulips
Chemehuevi North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 800 - - - 1300 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber.); Date is given only as "ancient "; Pg. 22: "In ancient times--no one can say how long ago--the Chemehuevi inhabitated the eastern half of the Mohave Desert in southern California. They were a small offshoot of the Paiute, who lived farther north and east in the Great Basin, and probably at no time did they number more than eight hundred men, women, and children. When or how they occupied lands inhabited by Yuman tribes along the Colorado River is not known. Yet before the beginning of the historical period in this region they dwelt along the river between the Bill Williams Fork and The Needles. "
Chemehuevi world 800 - - - 1300 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber.); Date is given only as "ancient "; Pg. 22: "In ancient times--no one can say how long ago--the Chemehuevi inhabitated the eastern half of the Mohave Desert in southern California. They were a small offshoot of the Paiute, who lived farther north and east in the Great Basin, and probably at no time did they number more than eight hundred men, women, and children. When or how they occupied lands inhabited by Yuman tribes along the Colorado River is not known. Yet before the beginning of the historical period in this region they dwelt along the river between the Bill Williams Fork and The Needles. "
Chen-ta-tao chiao China - - - - 1250 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 68. "Chen-ta-tao chiao: 'Teaching of the True Great Tao'; school of religious Taoism founded in 1142 C.E. by Liu Te-jen. Based on the concepts of the Tao-te ching, this school stresses the ideals of unmotivated action, contentment, & altruism. The adherents of the chen-ta-tao chiao strive toward the good & endeavor to avoid evil. Life-prolonging & magical practices play no part in this school, in which a strong Confucianist influence can be felt. The chen-ta-tao chiao reached its peak in the 13th century but faded out soon after. "
Chenchus India - south - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Speakers of Dravidian languages are found mainly in South India and include primitive hunters and food gatherers such as Chenchus and Kadars... "
Cherokee North America 25,000 - - - 1650 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 11. "Cherokee... Estimated at 25,000, in 1650, their population was close to 50,000 in 1982. "
Cherokee North America - Southeastern Woodlands 22,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Cherokee Oklahoma - - - - 1650 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 11. "Cherokee... Estimated at 25,000, in 1650, their population was close to 50,000 in 1982. A great number of them live in Oklahoma, but more are returning to their ancestral homes in Tennessee and North Carolina. "
Cherokee USA 50,000 - - - 1982 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 11. "Cherokee... Estimated at 25,000, in 1650, their population was close to 50,000 in 1982. A great number of them live in Oklahoma, but more are returning to their ancestral homes in Tennessee and North Carolina. "
Cherokee USA 308,132 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Cherokee USA 308,132 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Cherokee world 22,500 - - - 1650 Carmody, Denise Lardner & John Tully Carmody, Native American Religion: An Introduction, Paulist Press: New York, NY (1993); pg. 255. NOTE: adherent figure is really an estimate of tribe pop., regardless of which religion individuals practice. In earlier periods, all tribe practiced tribal religion, but not necessarily true today.
Cherokee world 22,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Cherubim and Seraphim Africa - West - - - - 1926 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1981. "...'spiritual Churches'. The term spiritual refers to the belief in the continued operation of spiritual power in the Church, and the expectation of revelations to the congregation at large through its inspired agents. Among bodies which prefer to be collectively known by this term is the... Cherubim and Seraphim movement, which is also found in other West African countries besides Nigeria, where it originated. "
Cherubim and Seraphim Nigeria - - 2,000
units
- 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Nigeria ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 40. "Some of the most remarkable growth in Christianity has occurred within the African church movement. In many cases, Nigerians have established their own versions of Christian churches that are free of some of the cultural influences of Europeans. The Cherubim and Seraphim movement, for example, has spread rapidly and now numbers over 2,000 churches. "
Cherubim and Seraphim Nigeria - - - - 1998 *LINK* Atansuyi, H. Olu. "Gospel and Culture from the Perspective of African Instituted Churches " in Cyberjournal for Pentecostal Charismatic Research (viewed 11 March 1999). "Barely a century ago, African Instituted Churches, a sacred people of God, came to bear witness of the Light, that, through them, people of their race might believe. In Nigeria, these African Instituted Churches are: Cherubim and Seraphim, founded by St. Moses Orimolade Tunolase... "
Cherubim and Seraphim world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "ALDURA, THE CHURCH OF THE LORD, also known as the Cherubim and Seraphim Churches. Growing out of several PROPHETIC movements in the Niger Delta in the 1890's, and strongly affected by the 1918 influenza epidemic, a number of AFRICAN INDEPENDENT CHURCHES came into existence which have since spread throughout West Africa with branches in Europe and North America. "
Chewa Africa 5,800,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 98-99. "Chewa: Location: Malawi; Zambia; Mozambique; Population: 5,800,000 in Maravi group million; Religion: Protestant; Roman Catholic; traditional beliefs; Islam "; "The main religino of the Chewa is Christianity... "; "It is estimated that 34% of Malawis population is Protestant, while 27% are Catholic, 19% hold to traditional beliefs, and 16% are Muslim. " [NOTE: This statistic is a measue of tribal/ethnic affiliation, NOT how many people practice Chew religion.]
Chewa Malawi - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; Culture column: "Chewas "; Location column: "Malawi "
Cheyenne North America 3,000 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 36. Estimates of total population from another source.
Cheyenne North America - Northern Great Plains 3,500 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Cheyenne USA 11,456 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Cheyenne USA 11,456 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Cheyenne USA 10,000 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 35. "Cheyenne... They live with the Arapaho on a reservation in Montana and Oklahoma. Their population... is more than 10,000 today. "
Cheyenne world 3,500 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Chibcha Colombia - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "
Chickasaw North America 5,000 - - - 1950 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 11. "Around 5,000 descendants remain in the middle of the twentieth century. "
Chickasaw North America - Southeastern Woodlands 8,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Chickasaw USA 20,631 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Chickasaw USA 20,631 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Chickasaw world 8,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Chiesa Evangelica Mennonita Italiana Italy 189 - 7
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Europe: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " ITALY: Chiesa Evangelica Mennonita Italiana; Members: 189; Congregations: 7
Chilluckittequaw North America - Pacific Coast 3,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Chilluckittequaw world 3,000 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Chilula North America - Pacific Coast 600 - - - 1400 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Chilula (aboriginal): 600 " [exact year not given]
Chilula world 600 - - - 1400 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Chilula (aboriginal): 600 " [exact year not given]
Chimakum North America - Pacific Coast 400 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Chimakum world 400 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Chimu Peru - - - - 1400 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1424. "The Mohica towns were taken over by a warrior group who came on balsa rafts from the north, led by a great king known as the Great Chimu. Chimu culture prospered exceedingly and from the 12th to the 15th centuries the kingdom was centred around the great city of Chan Chan... These people worshipped the stars and forces of Nature, but above all they adored the moon god, Si... "
Chin Bangladesh 50,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 163-164. "The Chin population in Bangladesh is about 50,000... "; [NOTE: This statistic is of cultural/ethnic affiliation, NOT a count of current practitioners of traditional Chin religion, as almost all Chin today are Christian.]
Chin India 800,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 163-164. "In India, another 400,000 live in Mizoram state, about 200,000 live in Manipur state, and some 200,000 are scattered throughout other parts of India. " [NOTE: This statistic is of cultural/ethnic affiliation, NOT a count of current practitioners of traditional Chin religion, as almost all Chin today are Christian.]
Chin India: Manipur 200,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 163-164. "In India, another 400,000 live in Mizoram state, about 200,000 live in Manipur state, and some 200,000 are scattered throughout other parts of India. " [NOTE: This statistic is of cultural/ethnic affiliation, NOT a count of current practitioners of traditional Chin religion, as almost all Chin today are Christian.]
Chin India: Mizoram 400,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 163-164. "In India, another 400,000 live in Mizoram state, about 200,000 live in Manipur state, and some 200,000 are scattered throughout other parts of India. " [NOTE: This statistic is of cultural/ethnic affiliation, NOT a count of current practitioners of traditional Chin religion, as almost all Chin today are Christian.]


Chin, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.