Adherents.com Home Page

Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Central Baptist Association, Indiana

Central Baptist Association, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Central Baptist Association Kentucky 475 0.01% 4
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 372. [Listed as 'Central Baptists.']
Central Baptist Association South Carolina 248 0.01% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 200. [Listed as 'Central Baptists.']
Central Baptist Association Tennessee 2,268 0.05% 12
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 1,878. [Listed as 'Central Baptists.']
Central Baptist Association USA 4,031 - 35
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Central Baptists.']
Central Baptist Association USA 4,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 44. "This association was formed in 1956 and is composed of 37 churches in Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, & South Carolina. Present membership is approximately 4,000. "
Central Baptist Association USA 4,000 - 37
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). "37 churches in Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana and South Carolina... Present membership is approximately 4,000. "
Central Baptist Association Virginia 749 0.01% 14
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 621. [Listed as 'Central Baptists.']
Central Baptist Association world 4,000 - - 1
country
1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 44. "This association was formed in 1956 and is composed of 37 churches in Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, & South Carolina. Present membership is approximately 4,000. "
Central Baptist Association world 4,000 - 37
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). "37 churches in Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana and South Carolina... Present membership is approximately 4,000. "
Central Baptist Church Tennessee 3,670 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Hixson, Tenn.; pastor James Latimer.
Central Canada Baptist Conference Canada - - 37
units
- 1992 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 244-247. Table 1: Canadian Current Statistics. (# of adherents is from table's "inclusive membership " column, not the sometimes smaller "full communicant or confirmed members " col.) Listed in table as "Central Canada Baptist Conference. "
Central Community Church of God Kansas 2,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; in Wichita, Kansas; pastor Raymond Cotton.
Central Yearly Meeting of Friends USA - - 11
units
1
country
1981 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Quakers (Friends); pg. 319. "Central Yearly Meeting of Friends... Alexandria, IN [H.Q.]... was formed in 1926 by several meetings in eastern Indiana who were protesting the liberalism of the Five Years Meeting... Churchs of this small body are found in Indiana, Arkansas and Michigan. Missionary work is sponsored in Bolivia. Membership: In 1981 the Meeting reported 11 congregations (monthly meetings) organized into 3 quarterly (district) meetings and 446 members. "
Centre of The Divine Ishtar California - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 74. "Centre of The Divine Ishtar, P.O. Box 9494, San Jose, CA 95157. Local (northern California-South SF Bay) Goddess worship fellowship with traditional eclectic/Wiccan focus; mixed genders; members of many traditions (Dianic, Gardnerian, Celtic, Eclectic, Qabalist, Santera, Culdee, etc.) "
Ceylon and India General Mission Sri Lanka - - - - 1893 *LINK* web site: "Christian Missions "; web page: "SIM History " (viewed 6 July 1999). "In 1893, off the southern tip of India, the Ceylon and India General Mission (CIGM) began work among Ceylon's Singhalese Buddhists and Tamil Hindus. From that island, the work begun by B. Davidson, D. Gardner, W. Mallis, and G. Wilson, all Englishmen, expanded into South India, later reaching across the subcontinent and eventually to the Philippines. "
Ceylon and India General Mission world - - 100
units
- 1999 *LINK* "Asia " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "The SIM-related church in India (CIGM) consists of 100 self-supporting, governing, and propagating churches, primarily in the Tamil and Telugu areas of southern India. "
Ch'ing-t'an China - - - - 245 C.E. Li, Dun Jen. The Ageless Chinese: A History (3rd Ed.). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1978); pg. 149. "This new vogue of ch'ing t'an, or 'purified conversation,' was begun in the 240s during the Wei dynasty and reached its apex of popularity during the West Tsin dynasty. Its architects were HoYen (d. ca 250), Wang Pi (226-249), and Kuo Hsiang (d. 312), all of whom were not only expert conversationalists but also writers of considerable originality. "
Ch'ing-t'an China - - - - 275 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 72. "Ch'ing-t'an... 'pure conversation'; neo-Taoist school that originated in the 3rd century C.E. Ch'ing-t'an refers to a refined form of conversation on the teachings of philosophical Taoism, particularly those of Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu. In this way the followers of the ch'ing-t'an formed a basis for reinterpreting the Confucianist classics from a neo-Taoist point of view. The most important representatives of the school were Wang Pi (226-49 C.E.), Kou Hsiang (?-ca. 312 C.E.), and Hsiang Hsiu (221-300 C.E.). "
Ch'ondogyo Korea - - - - 1880 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 116. "Chondokyo is a Korean syncretistic religion that emerged from the Tonghak (Eastern Learning) Movement of the mid to late 1800s. It draws from the teachings of shamanism, Buddhsim, Taoism, Confucianism, and Catholicism to emphasize the divine nature of all people. "
Ch'ondogyo Korea - - - - 1919 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 139. "During the First World War and its aftermath, the embers of nationalism within the Korean people burst into flames and anti-Japanese resistance increased. Christian, Confucian, Buddhist, and Ch'ondogyo leaders jointly decided in favor of a non-violent popular independence movement. "
Ch'ondogyo Korea - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "Korea, since the 1960s, has seen the emergence of religious movements seeking to rediscover the indigenous Korean religion, that ancient religion which is believed to have prevailed prior to the importation of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Christianity. These movements include... the Tae Jong Church, the Han Il Church, the Chun Do Church, and countless small groups of folk religionists. "
Ch'ondogyo Korea, North - 14.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994); pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "; listed as "Ch'ondogyo "
Ch'ondogyo Korea, North 3,320,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; listed as "Ch'ondogyo "
Ch'ondogyo Korea, North - - - - 1997 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 116-118. "Recent North Korean propaganda have highlighted the 1997 defection of O Ik Je (leader of the Chondoist movement in South Korea) to North Korea... O Ik Je's 1997 defection became the propaganda bonanza that added impetus to Pyongyang's effort to show that the truest Chondoists should give preeminence to Juche... Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il's control of Chondokyo now seem so complete that the native religion seems to be tolerated as an ancient form of the Juche religion... "
Ch'ondogyo Korea, North 3,000,000 12.50% - - 1999 Nash, Amy K. North Korea (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 9, 111. Pg. 9: "Population: 24 million "; Pg. 111: "Religious groups do still exist in the country. About 3 million North Koreans are Chundoists, 400,000 are Buddhists, 200,000 worship Christian faiths, and another 3 million follow some other form of traditional worship. "
Ch'ondogyo Korea, South 800,000 - - - 1978 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 414. "...Ch'ondo-kyo... In 1978 there were 1,700 clergy and over 800,000 members in South Korea. "
Ch'ondogyo Korea, South 52,530 0.14% 249
units
- 1983 *LINK* web site: "Little Korea "; web page: "Religion " (viewed 22 Jan. 1999) Table: "Status of Religions " (as of 1983); 3 columns: "churches ", "clergymen ", "followers "; presumably this is from a government survey or census.; Listed in table as "Chondogyo "
Ch'ondogyo Korea, South 50,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; listed as "Ch'ondogyo "
Ch'ondogyo Korea, South - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 703. "The South Koreans also have many newer religions that combine Christianity with native pre-Christian beliefs. The most widespread is Ch'ondogyo ('the Heavenly Way'), founded in 1860. "
Ch'ondogyo world 3,000,000 - - - 1998 Encyclopedia Britannica 1998 (Micropaedia, Vol. 3): "Ch'ondogyo ".; pg. 260-261. "Ch'ondogyo... by late 20th century there were some 3,000,000 adherents. "
Ch'ondogyo - clergy Korea, South 1,700 - - - 1978 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 414. "...Ch'ondo-kyo... In 1978 there were 1,700 clergy and over 800,000 members in South Korea. "
Ch'ondogyo - clergy Korea, South 3,264 - 249
units
- 1983 *LINK* web site: "Little Korea "; web page: "Religion " (viewed 22 Jan. 1999) Table: "Status of Religions " (as of 1983); 3 columns: "churches ", "clergymen ", "followers "; presumably this is from a government survey or census.; Listed in table as "Chondogyo "
Ch'uan-chen China - - - - 1150 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 745. "Between 1100 and 1400 three developments occurred that have helped shape modern Taoism... A third group of three new sects that arose in the twelfth century has been compared in purpose and effect within the Taoist movement to the Protestant Reformation in European Christianity. They rejected many magical elements... they stressed humility, altruism, and the renunciation of desires... The Ch'uan-chen sect, the only one of this group surviving today, has maintained a tradition of personal cultivation... and relatively strict celibate monasticism guided by, among other works, the Tao-Te Ching. "
Chagga Tanzania - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; Listed in table as "Chaga "
Chagga Tanzania 832,420 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 93-94. "Chagga: Alternate Names: Chaga, Waschagga, Jagga, or Dschagga; Location: Kilimanjaro region in northern Tanzania; Population: 832,420 million; Religion: Christianity, Islam "; "With the adoption of Western religions, traditional Chagga beliefs and practices have been reduced and synchronized to the new Christian beliefs... Islam was introduced to the Chagga people by early Swahili caravan traders... " [This is a measure of tribal affiliation, NOT a measure of how many people practice Chagga religion.]
Chai-chiao Taiwan - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 53. "In Taiwan Buddhism is active predominantly in its popular Pure Land form... there is also in Taiwan a folk Buddhism that is known as Chai-chiao (Religion of the Vegetarians), which included Confucian and Taoist elements. Its followers are lay people and wear white robes. "
Chakchiuma North America - Southeastern Woodlands 1,200 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Chakchiuma world 1,200 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Chakmas Bangladesh - - - - 1989 Brown, Susan. Pakistan and Bangladesh (series: People and Places). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Silver Burdett Press (1989); pg. 25. "Followers of Buddha: In the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh live several groups of people who follow the Buddhist religion. They originally came from Burma and still look like people of that country. The four main groups are called Chakmas, Marmas, Tripuras, and Mros. Each group speaks a different language. "
Chakmas Bangladesh 300,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 150-151. "The Chakma population today is estimated to be around 550,000 people, but it is spread over 3 different countries. The majority (approx. 300,000 people) are located in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh. " [NOTE: This is a tribal/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Chakmas India 230,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 150-151. "The Chakma population today is estimated to be around 550,000 people, but it is spread over 3 different countries... population spills over [from Bangladesh] into neighboring areas of southwest Mizoram State in India, where another 80,000 Chakmas live, & Burma (Myanmar) which has 20,000 Chakmas. In addition, Tripura State in India has some 50,000 Chakma refugees who fled Bangladeshi Army operations... in 1988. Another group of Chakmas, now numbering around 100,000 people, is found in the foothills of the Himalayas in northeastern India. " [NOTE: This is a tribal/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Chakmas India: Mizoram 80,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 150-151. "The Chakma population today is estimated to be around 550,000 people, but it is spread over 3 different countries... population spills over [from Bangladesh] into neighboring areas of southwest Mizoram State in India, where another 80,000 Chakmas live... " [NOTE: This is a tribal/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Chakmas India: Tripura 50,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 150-151. "The Chakma population... Tripura State in India has some 50,000 Chakma refugees who fled Bangladeshi Army operations... " [NOTE: This is a tribal/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Chakmas Myanmar 20,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 150-151. "...Burma (Myanmar) which has 20,000 Chakmas. " [NOTE: This is a tribal/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Chakmas world 550,000 - - 3
countries
1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 150-151. "The Chakma population today is estimated to be around 550,000 people, but it is spread over 3 different countries. The majority (approx. 300,000 people) are located in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh. This population spills over into neighboring areas of southwest Mizoram State in India, where another 80,000 Chakmas live, & Burma (Myanmar) which has 20,000 Chakmas. In addition, Tripura State in India has some 50,000 Chakma refugees who fled Bangladeshi Army operations... in 1988. Another group of Chakmas, now numbering around 100,000 people, is found in the foothills of the Himalayas in northeastern India. "; "The Chakmas are Buddhists & officially follow... Theravada... Buddhism, as practiced by the Chakmas, is... a mixture of southern & northern (Mahayana) forms, with a touch of Hinduism & aspects of shamanism & animism thrown into the mix. " [NOTE: This is a tribal/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Chaldean Church Assyria - 45.00% - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Assyria Online! "; web page: "Brief History of the Asyrians " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999), by Peter BetBasoo. Pie chart graphic: "Approximation by Assyria Online " "Assyria is located in north Mesopotamia and spans 4 countries: In Syria it extends west to the Euphrates river; in Turkey it extends north to Harran, Edessa, Diyarbakir, and Lake Van; in Iran it extends east to Lake Urmi, and in Iraq it extends to about 100 miles south of Kirkuk. "; Pie chart: "Chaldean 45%; Syriac Orthodox 26%; Church of the East 19%; Other 6%; Syriac Catholic 4%. "
Chaldean Church world 100,000 - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 84. "Independent Churches of Eastern Christianity... The two main Nestorian Churches are the Assyrian or East Syrian Church; and the Chaldean Church, with almost 100,000 believers in Iraq, Syria and Iran. "
Cham Cambodia 30,000 - - - 1910 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. By 1910, in other reports, there were approximately 45,000 Cham in both countries, half as many in Viet Nam as in Cambodia. " [NOTE: This is a cultural/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Cham Cambodia 200,000 - - - 1975 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. "Their numbers [after 1910] then increased rapidly. By 1970, according to some Cham, their numbers in Cambodia and Viet Nam totalled close to one million. Scholars are more conservative, suggesting that in 1975 there were between 150,000 and 200,000 Muslims in Cambodia and the same number or slightly fewer in Viet Nam. "
Cham Cambodia - - - - 1996 Sheehan, Sean. Cambodia (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1996); pg. 50. "Current estimates put the number of Chams in Cambodia at about 240,000. Most live in a couple of hundred villages clustered along the Mekong River to the east and north of the capital. "; "Pg. 76: "The Cham are devout Muslims. "
Cham Europe - Western 1,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. "Today, there are approximately 7,000 Cham living beyond the borders of Cambodia and Vietnam. These include 3,000 Cham in Malaysia, approximately 3,000 Cham in the United States, 1,000 in Western Europe, and a few hundred in Canada, Australia, several Arab countries, and Indonesia. "
Cham Malaysia 3,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. "Today, there are approximately 7,000 Cham living beyond the borders of Cambodia and Vietnam. These include 3,000 Cham in Malaysia... "
Cham USA 3,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. "Today, there are approximately 7,000 Cham living beyond the borders of Cambodia and Vietnam. These include... approximately 3,000 Cham in the United States... "
Cham Vietnam 15,000 - - - 1910 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. By 1910, in other reports, there were approximately 45,000 Cham in both countries, half as many in Viet Nam as in Cambodia. " [NOTE: This is a cultural/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Cham Vietnam 200,000 - - - 1975 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. "Their numbers [after 1910] then increased rapidly. By 1970, according to some Cham, their numbers in Cambodia and Viet Nam totalled close to one million. Scholars are more conservative, suggesting that in 1975 there were between 150,000 and 200,000 Muslims in Cambodia and the same number or slightly fewer in Viet Nam. "; [NOTE: This is a cultural/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Cham Vietnam 16,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* "News in Brief " in Hinduism Today International (Feb.1996: Vol. 18, No. 2) "The Cham people, 16,000 in Vietnam, still worship Shiva and Parvati. "
Cham world 15,000 - - 2
countries
1890 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. "The Cham of Viet Nam and Cambodia are descendants of refugees from the ancient kingdom of Champa who fled central Vietnam 500 years ago. "; "By the late 1800s, according to some reports, not many Cham were left -- maybe as few a 15,000 in both Viet Nam and Cambodia. "; "The Cham who fled the Champa kingdom of central Vietnam in the 15th century apparently converted to Islam sometime before the 17th century... " [NOTE: This is a cultural/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Cham world 45,000 - - 2
countries
1910 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. By 1910, in other reports, there were approximately 45,000 Cham in both countries, half as many in Viet Nam as in Cambodia. " [NOTE: This is a cultural/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Cham world 1,000,000 - - 2
countries
1970 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. "Their numbers [after 1910] then increased rapidly. By 1970, according to some Cham, their numbers in Cambodia and Viet Nam totalled close to one million. Scholars are more conservative, suggesting that in 1975 there were between 150,000 and 200,000 Muslims in Cambodia and the same number or slightly fewer in Viet Nam. "; "Cambodian Cham are Muslims. Islam has been their defining characteristic... All Cambodian Cham are Sunni Muslim of the Shafii school, although there are traditionalist and orthodox branches... Most Cham in Vietnam are Hidu who practice a form of Shaioita Brahmanism. " [NOTE: This is a cultural/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Cham world 400,000 - - 2
countries
1975 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. "Their numbers [after 1910] then increased rapidly. By 1970, according to some Cham, their numbers in Cambodia and Viet Nam totalled close to one million. Scholars are more conservative, suggesting that in 1975 there were between 150,000 and 200,000 Muslims in Cambodia and the same number or slightly fewer in Viet Nam. "
Cham - orthodox Cambodia 66,600 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. "Scholars... in 1975 [suggested] there were between 150,000 and 200,000 Muslims in Cambodia "; "Cambodian Cham are Muslims. Islam has been their defining characteristic... All Cambodian Cham are Sunni Muslim of the Shafii school, although there are traditionalist and orthodox branches... Traditional Cambodian Cham, numbering about two-thirds of Cambodian Cham, have kept many ancient traditions and rituals... The remaining one-third of Cambodian Cham are orthodox Cham who retain religious beliefs and practices much closer to Muslims from other countries... Most traditional Cham are scattered throughout central Cambodia, while orthodox Cham are located primarily around the capital of Phnom Penh... & in provinces to the south. "
Cham - traditional Cambodia 133,200 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 154-155. "Scholars... in 1975 [suggested] there were between 150,000 and 200,000 Muslims in Cambodia "; "Cambodian Cham are Muslims. Islam has been their defining characteristic... All Cambodian Cham are Sunni Muslim of the Shafii school, although there are traditionalist & orthodox branches... Traditional Cambodian Cham,... about 2/3 of Cambodian Cham, have kept many ancient traditions & rituals. Although they consider Allah the single, all-powerful God, they also recognize other non-Islamic deities. [Thus] they resemble the Cham of coastal Vietnam more than Muslims of other countries... remaining 1/3 of Cambodian Cham are orthodox Cham... Most traditional Cham are scattered throughout central Cambodia, while orthodox Cham are located primarily around the capital of Phnom Penh... & in provinces to the south. "
Chamars India 45,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 159-160. "Chamars: Alternate Names: Untouchables; Scheduled Caste; Location: Northern India (mainly Uttar Pradesh state); Population: About 45 million; Religion: Hinduism; traditional animism, nature-worship, an superstition "; "Chamars form one of the major occupational castes of India... In general, Chamars are Hindus... Given their low status in traditional Hindu society, it is not surprising that Chamars have been attracted to religions that downplay or reject notions of untouchability... Many are followers of devotional (bhakti) Hindu sects such as Kabir Panth... [others have accepted Sikhism, Christianity, and Islam...] More recently, some groups such as the Jadavs in Uttar Pradesh have converted to Buddhism... " [NOTE: Chamars is a cultural/ethnic group, NOT a distinct religion.]
Chamba Togo - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Chao Fa USA - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 231. "Some Hmong Americans follow the Chao Fa religion of Laos, begun in the 1960s by Hmong prophet Yang Chong Leu (or Shang Lue Yang) who preached a return to traditional Hmong ways. Yang Chong Leu also promoted a traditional system of writing known as Pahawh Hmong, still used by Chao Fa followers today. "


Chao Fa, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.