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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Catholic - Ukrainian Catholic, Ukraine

Catholic - Ukrainian Catholic, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Catholic - Ukrainian Catholic Ukraine 5,000,000 9.49% - - 1997 Bassis, Volodymyr. Ukraine (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1997); pg. 75. "The Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church (sometimes called the Uniate Church) has the second largest following in Ukraine. This denomination originated in 1596 for the benefit of Roman Catholic Poland, which dominated significant parts of Ukraine at the time. The Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church follows the Eastern rites, while recognizing the leadership of the Pope in Rome. There are about five million faithful Greek-Catholics, most of whom live in the western part of Ukraine... "
Catholic - Ukrainian Catholic Ukraine 5,000,000 9.62% - - 1997 Clay, Rebecca. Ukraine: A New Independence (series: Exploring Cultures of the World). New York: Benchmark Books/Marshall Cavendish (1997); pg. 29. "The second-largest denomination is the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church, with about 5 million people, who mostly live in the western regions. "
Catholic - Ukrainian Catholic USA - - 51
units
- 1898 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 428. "Because Ukrainians lacked a cohesive national identity for so much of their history, cultural identity became centered on the Ukrainian Church. The Ukrainian Catholic church follows the Byzantine Rite, rather than the Latin Rite followed by earlier Catholic immigrants to the US. Therefore, Ukrainian Catholics set up their own churches when they came to the US. By 1898, there were 51 Ukrainian Catholic Churches in Ameria. "
Catholic - Ukrainian Catholic world 5,323,841 - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "...Catholic Church... Eastern Churches, Eastern Rites, Greek Catholics, 'Uniate' Churches c. 16,700,000 combined... Byzantine Rites:... Slovakian Catholic Church 229,190; Ukrainian Catholic Church 5,323,841 "
Catholic - Ukrainian Catholic Yukon - 0.00% - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "Statistics Canada "; web page: "Population, by religion, 1991 Census " (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); Source: Statistics Canada, Catalogue no. 93-319-XPB. table: "Population, by religion, 1991 Census "
Catholic - Uniate Belarus - 75.00% - - 1839 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 63. "In their geopolitical striving toward Western Europe, the tsars used the convenient pretext of 'liberating' their co-religionists of the 'Russian faith' from Polic Catholic domination. In 1839 the Uniate Church of Belarus, to which about 75% of the population adhered, was forcibly converted to Russian Orthodoxy. "
Catholic - Uniate Belarus - - 8
units
- 1993 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 63. "In 1993, there were about 1,500 religious congregations in Belarus, including 787 Orthodox, 305 Roman Catholic, 170 Pentecostal, 141 Baptist, 26 Old Believer... 17 Seventh-Day Adventist, 9 Apostolic Christian, 8 Uniate, 8 New Apostolic, 8 Muslim, 7 Jewish, and 15 others. "
Catholic - Uniate Bulgaria 16,582 0.20% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Bulgarian Orthodox 85%, Muslim 13%, Jewish 0.8%, Roman Catholic 0.5%, Uniate Catholic 0.2%, Protestant, Gregorian-Armenian, and other 0.5%; Total population: 8,290,988.
Catholic - Uniate Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 223. "Uniate: The Uniate churches recognize the authority of the Pope and follow the dogmas of the Roman Catholic Church. They are headed by patriarchs and practice their own liturgical rites. In the Middle East they include the Greek Catholic, the Maronite, the Syrian Catholic, the Armenian Catholic, the Coptic Catholic and the Ethiopian Catholic Churches. "
Catholic - Uniate Romania 1,500,000 - - - 1948 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973); pg. 29. "In 1946 the Uniats of Ukraine (about 5,000,000) and in 1948 those of Rumania (1,500,000) were forcibly separated by the Communists from the Roman Catholic Church and joined to the Russian and Rumanian Orthodox churches. The change was affected by arresting the entire Catholic hierarchy and offering the clergy a choice between imprisonment (or death) and separation from Rome. "
Catholic - Uniate Romania 1,389,210 6.00% - - 1989 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 23,153,475 [total pop.] (1989). About 70 percent Romanian Orthodox, 6 percent Uniate, 6 percent Roman Catholic, 6 percent Protestant, 12 percent unaffiliated or other.
Catholic - Uniate Romania 40,434 3.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 22,463,077. Romanian Orthodox 70%, Roman Catholic 6% (of which 3% are Uniate), Protestant 6%, unaffiliated 18% [Uniate: Technically, 3% of 6% would be .18%, but this actually means 3% total]
Catholic - Uniate Slovenia 39,462 2.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 1,973,096. Roman Catholic 70.8% (including 2% Uniate), Lutheran 1%, Muslim 1%, other 27.2%
Catholic - Uniate USA 462,210 - - - 1957 Spence, Hartzell. The Story of America's Religions; New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1960) [1st printing 1957]; pg. 102. "These 'Eastern Rite' Catholics, as they are called, number 46,210 and minister chiefly to Americans of Ukrainian, Eastern and Middle European backgrounds, as well as some Arab. "
Catholic - Uniate USA 808,679 - - - 1969 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 20. Eastern Rite or "Eastern Catholic " -- in communion with Roman Catholic Church, recognizing Pope as head, but from Orthodox tradition.
Catholic - Uniate USA 700,000 - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973); pg. 29. "There are nine Eastern rite Uniat churches in the United States, among which the Byzantine comprises 80% of the total 700,000 church membership. "
Catholic - Uniate USA 477,574 - - - 1996 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997); pg. 432-437. Tables: "Catholic Population of the United States " and "Percentage of Catholics in Total Population in U.S. "; "Eastern Churches " total for USA. These are formerly non-Roman Catholic Eastern churches which are now in communion with main Roman Cath. church.
Catholic - Uniate world 8,200,000 - - - 1935 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 669. "8,200,000 belong to the Eastern Churches in union with Rome. (D. Attwater, 'The Catholic Eastern Churches,' 1935). "
Catholic - Uniate world 10,000,000 - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973); pg. 28-29. "Uniat Churches, in general, those branches of Eastern Christian churches which are in communion with Rome... Their total world membership is about 10,000,000. "
Catholic - Uniate world 8,800,000 - - - 1980 Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 117. "Figure 2.9: Christianity, 1980: world figures (after Barrett, 1982) "
Catholic - Uniate world 10,000,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 775. "Uniat Churches. Eastern churches that profess doctrinal teachings (including filioque) of the Roman Catholic Church, accept papal primacy, and are in communion with Rome. These churches retain their own liturgies and languages and follow their canon law. They have a married clergy... Worldwide ther are over ten million Uniats. "
Catholic - Ursuline world - - - - 1535 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "URSULINE ORDER: a ROMAN CATHOLIC Order of NUNS originally founded in 1535 by Angela Merici as a SOCIETY for unmarried women dedicated to teaching. It developed into a religious Order following the RULE OF SAINT AUGUSTINE in the seventeenth century. "
Catholic - Ursuline world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 779. "Ursulines. To instruct girls at Brescia, St. Angela Merici in 535 founded the Company of St. Ursula (a popular patron of education). From Angela's beginnings arose different religious communities called Ursulines. Many Ursuline communities in North America are independent of each other and vary in organization, way of life, and apostolate. "
Catholic - Vietnamese parishes Louisiana: New Orleans 10,000 - 1
unit
- 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 443. "The largest [Vietnamese Roman Catholic] parish [in the United States] is in New Orleans with some 10,000 parishioners. "
Catholic - Vietnamese parishes USA - Vietnamese - - 22
units
- 1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 442-443. "The total estimated population of Vietnamese Americans in 1991 was 850,000 "; "Although Roman Catholics make up only 10% of the population of Vietnam, about 29-40% of Vietnamese Americans are Catholic. This is due to the high percentage of Roman Catholics among the first wave of refugees, and the involvement of Roman Catholic organizations in refugee resettlement to the US. Many Vietnamese refugees, in gratitude to their Roman Catholic US sponsors, at least nominally converted to Roman Catholicism. There are now about 100 Vietnamese American catholic communities and 22 official parishes, and over 800 Vietnamese American priests and nuns in the US. The largest parish is in New Orleans with some 10,000 parishioners. "
Catholic - white USA - 25.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Web site: Pew Research Center (1998): "The Diminishing Divide: American Churches, American Politics " "White Catholics and white non-evangelical Protestants also now each represent about one-fourth of the electorate. "
Catholic - Xaverian Brothers world 440 - 50
units
- 1929 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 834. "Xaverian Brothers: A Roman Catholic Congregation of Lay Brothers, founded at Bruges, Belgium, by Theodore James Rijken in 1839... In 1929 the congregation possessed some fifty houses and numbered 440 members. "
Catholic Alliance USA 125,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Eckstron, Kevin (RNS). "Former Vatican Envoy WorkingTo Boost Catholic Political Clout " in Salt Lake Tribune, 16 Oct. 1999 (v. online). "In April, he found a way to blend his personal faith and his public politicking when he became president of the Catholic Alliance, a lay-run political advocacy group that was an off-shoot of the much larger Christian Coalition. The nonprofit organization severed ties with the Christian Coalition in 1997. Flynn's main goal is to re-establish Catholics as a body of voters that politicians listen to, much as they listen to blacks, Jews or Hispanics. The Washington-based group currently claims 125,000 members; Flynn hopes to raise that number to around 400,000. "
Catholic Apostolic Church (Irvingites) Germany 10,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Katholisch-Apostolische Gemeinden (um Edward Irving) " in table. Source: REMID.
Catholic Apostolic Church (Irvingites) United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1834 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1459. "As a result of growing hostility, the Irvingite members left Regent Square [a Presbyterian church in London] in 1832 and moved to a dark chapel in Newman Street, where they set themselves up as the Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church. [Edward] Irving was beginning to see himself as the leader of a faithful remnant whom God was gathering together as the end of the world came near... Yet when Irving died in December 1834 he left behind him no distinctive body of doctrine, no blueprint for a Church, no liturgy or ministry; and every expectation was that the fledgling Catholic Apostolic Church was destined to an early oblivion. "
Catholic Apostolic Church (Irvingites) United Kingdom: London - - 7
units
- 1850 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1459. "The new Church prospered financially. Besides Drummond, a number of rich men belonged and all its members paid a tenth of their income to the church. A tenth part of this tithe went to the headquarters at Albury and the rest was used for the upkeep and growth of the movement. It grew rapidly. Soon there were seven churches in London besides others in many of the main provincial towns and the Irvingites spread overseas, particularly to Germany and the United States. "
Catholic Apostolic Church (Irvingites) USA 4,000 - 25
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 130. Catholic Apostolic Church (Irvingites):... in part growing from prophetic preaching of Edward Irving, (1792-1834). 2 divisions: Catholic Apostolic Church & New Apostolic Church. The last census... 25 churches & 4,000 members for both in U.S.
Catholic Apostolic Church (Irvingites) world - - 1
unit
1
country
1834 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1459. "As a result of growing hostility, the Irvingite members left Regent Square [a Presbyterian church in London] in 1832 and moved to a dark chapel in Newman Street, where they set themselves up as the Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church. [Edward] Irving was beginning to see himself as the leader of a faithful remnant whom God was gathering together as the end of the world came near... Yet when Irving died in December 1834 he left behind him no distinctive body of doctrine, no blueprint for a Church, no liturgy or ministry; and every expectation was that the fledgling Catholic Apostolic Church was destined to an early oblivion. "
Catholic Apostolic Church (Irvingites) world - - - - 1963 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1459. "There was however no provision for the continuation of the hierarchy... The ritualist movement within the Church of England meant that there was increasingly no real need for the Catholic Apostolics. They became a small, pious group, very orthodox in belief and less and less insistent upon the Adventism which had been their one distinctive trait. Their churches passed into the hands of other bodies which needed them: Anglican, Roman Catholic, and Orthodox. Individual members made their submission to Rome or Canterbury and finally in 1963 the great cathedral church in Gordon Square was leased to the Church of England as their chaplaincy to the University of London. The last apostle died in 1903 and there are now no clergy left, although some services from the Irvingite liturgy are still read in Gordon Square. The Church... stands as a magnificent memorial to a movement founded by a small group of connoisseurs whose lives Edward Irving had changed. "
Catholic Apostolic Church (Irvingites) world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC CHURCH: sometimes known as 'Irvingites.' This group was founded by Edward IRVING, (1792-1834), and originated as a CHARISMATIC group but soon developed LITURGICAL aspects similar to ROMAN CATHOLICISM and GREEK ORTHODOXY but with a strong emphasis on the imminent return of CHRIST. As a movement it had some success in the late nineteenth century before entering a period of slow decline. Today its influence is felt mostly among NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS in the Third World especially in Africa. "
Catholic Apostolic Church at Davis California - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy; pg. 139. "Catholic Apostolic Church at Davis... Davis, CA [H.Q.]... The Catholic Orthodox Church at Davis was founded in 1972 by Albert Ronald Coady. Coady was ordained in May 1972 by Archbishoip John Marion Stanley of the Orthodox Church of the East... Originally known as the Christian Orthodox Church, it became known as the Eastern Catholic Church Syro-Chaldean Rite before taking its present name in the mid-1980s. The church is Eastern in its liturgy... Membership: Not reported. "
Catholic Apostolic Church in America Australia - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 120. "Membership: In 1988... There were 3 parishes in Canada served by 2 priests, and mission parishes in Australia and Mexico. "
Catholic Apostolic Church in America Canada - - 3
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 120. "Membership: In 1988 the church reported 5,000 members in 20 parishes served by 25 priests in the U.S. There were 3 parishes in Canada served by 2 priests... "
Catholic Apostolic Church in America Mexico - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 120. "Membership: In 1988... There were 3 parishes in Canada served by 2 priests, and mission parishes in Australia and Mexico. "
Catholic Apostolic Church in America New York: Buffalo 136 - 1
unit
- 1926 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997). [Orig. source: 1926 U.S. govt. census from Bureau of the Census, 1930, vol. 1]; pg. 8. "Table 31. Number of churches, membership [incl. children]... 1926 "; Reports prepared by pastors/boards of elders. Listed in table as Catholic Apostolic Church.
Catholic Apostolic Church in America North America - - 23
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 120. "Membership: In 1988 the church reported 5,000 members in 20 parishes served by 25 priests in the U.S. There were 3 parishes in Canada served by 2 priests, and mission parishes in Australia and Mexico. "
Catholic Apostolic Church in America USA 5,000 - 20
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 120. "Membership: In 1988 the church reported 5,000 members in 20 parishes served by 25 priests in the U.S. "
Catholic Apostolic Church in America world - - 25
units
4
countries
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 120. "San Francisco, CA [H.Q.]... Though officially reconstituted in 1983, the Catholic Apostolic Church in America continues an unbroken existence from 1950 when Stephen Meyer Corradi-Scarella established an American outpost of the Catholic Apostolic Church in Brazil [which was] formed in 1946 by Dom Carlos Duarte Costa, a former bishop of the Roman Catholic Church... Membership: In 1988 the church reported 5,000 members in 20 parishes served by 25 priests in the U.S. There were 3 parishes in Canada served by 2 priests, and mission parishes in Australia and Mexico. "
Catholic Charismatic Renewal world 350,000 - - - 1972 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 150-151. "...within the Catholic church, the reforms associated with the Second Vatican Council led to the formation of numerous new organizations and special purpose movements, by far the most prominent of which was the Catholic Charismatic Renwal, founded at Notre Dame University in 1967. By the early 1970s this movement counted more than 350,000 among its members. "
Catholic Christian Church California: San Francisco - - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 70. "Catholic Christian Church... Stanford now heads ministries in San Francisco, California, through the church's chapel, the Holy Order of the Society of St. Jude Thaddeus, and the Natinoal Catholic Street Ministry Project. In addition to the work in San Francisco, the church reports three mission stations. There are two bishops and three priests.; Membership: Not reported. "
Catholic Christian Church USA - - 4
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 70. "Catholic Christian Church... Stanford now heads ministries in San Francisco, California, through the church's chapel, the Holy Order of the Society of St. Jude Thaddeus, and the Natinoal Catholic Street Ministry Project. In addition to the work in San Francisco, the church reports three mission stations. There are two bishops and three priests.; Membership: Not reported. "
Catholic Church of the Apostles of the Latter Times North America - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 71. "Catholic Church of the Apostles of the Latter Times... Membership: Followers have been reported throughout North America, though most are concentrated in Quebec. "
Catholic Church of the Apostles of the Latter Times Quebec - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 71. "Catholic Church of the Apostles of the Latter Times... [Headquarters:] St. Jovite, PQ, Canada... "; "Membership: Followers have been reported throughout North America, though most are concentrated in Quebec. "
Catholic Golden Age USA 700,000 - - - 1988 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 111. "A group called Catholic Golden Age [a special purpose group, NOT a religion or denomination]... was organized in 1974 to minister to the special needs and interests of Catholics past the age of 50. Presently numbering some 700,000 members... "
Catholic Life Church world - - 27
units
- 1974 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 43. -
Catholic Patriotic Church China - - - - 1958 Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 339. "The Communist conquest of China, however, which was completed by 1950, brought on a tremendous trial for all Christians... The Communist strategy was to completely detach the Chinese Catholics from any foreign ties. A Catholic Patriotic Church, completely independent from Rome, was set up, and its hierarchy was initiated with the consecration of 2 Chinese priests in 1958 by 4 legitimate Roman Catholic bishops. With the almost complete blackout of information, it is difficult to present to judge the success of this effort, thought it is estimated that by 1962 some 42 bishops were illicitly consecrated, & recent Vatican reports say that the Roman Catholic Church in China has been virtually wiped out. "
Cayapo Brazil - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "
Cayuga North America 1,111 - - - 1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 252. "The total population of Iroquois today is over 60,000 (according to the US Census of 1990 and Canadian Census of 1991). " Table showing tribes of the Iroquois nation (Mohawk, Oneida, Seneca, Tuscarora, Onondaga, Cayaga), and population of the tribe. [NOTE: This is a measure of tribal affiiation. Most Iroquois today are Christian.]
Cayuse North America 500 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 73. "The Cayuse... They numbered 500 in 1780, 370 in 1937. "
Cayuse North America 370 - - - 1937 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 73. "The Cayuse... They numbered 500 in 1780, 370 in 1937. "
Celestial Church of Christ Nigeria - - - - 1998 *LINK* Atansuyi, H. Olu. "Gospel and Culture from the Perspective of African Instituted Churches " in Cyberjournal for Pentecostal Charismatic Research (viewed 11 March 1999). "Barely a century ago, African Instituted Churches, a sacred people of God, came to bear witness of the Light, that, through them, people of their race might believe. In Nigeria, these African Instituted Churches are:... Christ Apostolic Church, founded by Pastor/Prophet Joseph Ayo Babalola; Celestial Church of Christ, founded by Revd/Pastor Samuel B.J. Oshofa. "
Celestial Church of Christ Nigeria - - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: National Council of Churches of Christ in the U.S.A.; web page: news release represents a modest edit of the wrap-up prepared by the World Council of Churches (1998). Viewed 7 Oct. 1999. "Membership of the WCC rose to a record 339 churches as the Assembly welcomed eight more. There are now 306 churches in full membership and 33 in associate membership. Appropriately for the Assembly's venue, six of the new churches are African: the United Church of Christ in Zimbabwe, [etc.]... A request for membership by the Celestial Church of Christ in Nigeria was delayed after delegates expressed concern that the church still has polygamous clergy. A later vote ran into a legal problem and the application will now be considered by the new Central Committee. "
Celt Europe - - - - -400 B.C.E. King, John. The Celtic Druids' Year: Seasonal Cycles of the Ancient Celts. London, UK: Blandford (1994); pg. 36. "On the mainland of Europe, the Celts began expanding southwards and westwards during the La Tene period. The first Celtic invasions of Italy took place before 400 BC, when Celtic tribes drove the Etruscans out of Po valley. Interestingly, it is from the Etruscans that the later Romans borrows many religious beliefs and practices, including the priestly sanctification of the foundations and outer bounds of a city. It is quite likely that the early Celts found the rigid fatalism of the Etruscans as antipathetic as they later found the rigid autoritarianism of the Romans. "
Celt Europe - - - - 400 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 437. "The early Celts were composed of a number of different racial elements, and at the height of ehir power they ccupied huge tracts of Europe, from the Atlantic in the west to the Black Sea in the east, from Denmark in the north to the Mediterranean in the south. But in spite of the decentralized nature of Celtic society and the many geographicl and tribal differences that must be taken into consideration, ther is an impressive uniformity of religious idiom throughout the known Celtic world which allows us to think in terms of Celtic religion even though there is little evidence of a formal religious system. "
Celt United Kingdom: Britain - - - - -900 B.C.E. King, John. The Celtic Druids' Year: Seasonal Cycles of the Ancient Celts. London, UK: Blandford (1994); pg. 36. "There is no clear date for the arrival of the first Goidelic-speaking Celts in Britain, although any date earlier than 900 BC (about 600 years after the completion of Stonehenge) seems very unlikely. Some time between 500 and 250 BC, during the La Tene phase, occurred the arrival, or separation, of the Brythonic-speaking Celts. These two different groups are sometis referred to as the Q-Celts and P-Celts. "
Celtic Evangelical Church world - - 1
unit
1
country
1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 101. "Celtic Evangelical Church... Membership: In 1984, the Church had one congregation in Hawaii. "
Central American Mission El Salvador - - - - 1974 Haverstock, Nathan A. & John P. Hoover. El Salvador in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). New York: Sterling Publishing, Inc. (1974); pg. 40. "The Central American Mission and the Baptist Home Mission Societies are active. "
Central American Mission Guatemala 23,000 - 95
units
- 1975 Scotchmer, David G. "Life of the Heart: A Maya Protestant Spirituality " in South and Meso-American Native Spirituality, ed. by Gary H. Gossen. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co. (1997); pg. 506. "The oldest and largest [of the Indian/Maya churches] is the Central American Mission, which pioneered Maya Indian evangelization and showed 95 churches with over 23,000 active members (or 28% of all Indian Protestants) representing some 8 different language groups. "
Central American Mission Guatemala - Indian/Maya 23,000 28.00% 95
units
- 1975 Scotchmer, David G. "Life of the Heart: A Maya Protestant Spirituality " in South and Meso-American Native Spirituality, ed. by Gary H. Gossen. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co. (1997); pg. 506. "The oldest and largest [of the Indian/Maya churches] is the Central American Mission, which pioneered Maya Indian evangelization and showed 95 churches with over 23,000 active members (or 28% of all Indian Protestants) representing some 8 different language groups. "
Central Baptist Association Indiana 291 0.01% 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 226. [Listed as 'Central Baptists.']


Central Baptist Association, continued

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